#1
For instance I was reading an article (http://guitar.about.com/library/weekly/aa052001b.htm) which I found googling, and tried one of them (Loud Love). It says it is based on the E Dorian, and while it begins with E it ends with G. This holds true to many (if not all) of the riffs there. Wouldn't this break the Dorian part?

At the same time I don't think so as major (Ionian) and minor (Aeolian) can be classified as such without beginning and ending on the roots. But what makes it Dorian then? Is it just that is resolves to E while being the same notes as the D major scale without it being necessary to begin and end with the root notes?

PS: Also in regards to chords to go along with a mode, you would keep in say A Dorian:
G - Major
A - Minor
B - Minor
C - Major
D - Major
E - Minor
F# - Diminished
Last edited by CloserToTheSun at Apr 13, 2008,
#2
The progression determines the modality, and since E Dorian is a minor mode a G major chord would not suggest Dorian. You'd want something like a m7 or m6.

EDIT: I see you meant the note G and not a G chord, so it could certainly still be E Dorian provided the chording suggests it.
Last edited by :-D at Apr 13, 2008,
#3
You can start and end on whatever note you want. The progression determines the mode.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Quote by CloserToTheSun
Is it just that is resolves to E while being the same notes as the D major scale?
Yes.

That part where you say, "It resolves to E," is vital. Do not underestimate the importance of that statement.
#5
Quote by CloserToTheSun
PS: Also in regards to chords to go along with a mode, you would keep in say A Dorian:
G - Major
A - Minor
B - Minor
C - Major
D - Major
E - Minor
F# - Diminished

Though the chords are right, be careful. Modes are harmonically unstable and will want to resolve back to the parent scale; if you use those chords in a way where the progression does not resolve to A, you're not using A Dorian.
#6
Quote by :-D
Though the chords are right, be careful. Modes are harmonically unstable and will want to resolve back to the parent scale; if you use those chords in a way where the progression does not resolve to A, you're not using A Dorian.


Yeah, just making sure that I had the tonality (is that the right word?) for any chord you would use right.
#7
Quote by CloserToTheSun
Yeah, just making sure that I had the tonality (is that the right word?) for any chord you would use right.

Right word and right chords. You can also use the word "quality" to describe a chord's tonality if you so choose.