#1
I own a Laguna LE422 with a Wilkinson bridge that's floating above and parallel to the body of the guitar.



I've noticed certain problems about this floating setup.
1. No matter what lube I put on the nut/bridge saddles, pulling up and letting go won't return the guitar to pitch.
2. I don't necessarily need the extra semi/whole tone pull up since I have a whammy pedal.
3. If one string goes out of tune, the others go out of tune.
4. Bending one note in a double stop causes the other note to flatten.
5. Palm muting will rock the bridge.

Now, I've been thinking of not setting the bridge to float. I am faced with two choices.

The bridge sits on the surface of the guitar in a slant position while the studs are still high up



The bridge sits flat on the surface of the guitar; the studs are lowered.



I'd like some input from similar trem users about the slant vs flat on body.

Sitting Slant vs Flat on Body, which has:
1. Lower string action?
2. Better tuning stability?
3. Greater diving range?
4. Less tension on strings?
5. Better pitch return?
6. Better tone?

And lastly, what is the overall difference between the two?

I appreciate all your answers in helping me decide. Here's more info on the hardware of my guitar: locking tuners, roller string trees, graphite nut, swamp ash body with maple top.

Thanks.
#3
I would lower the studs, make it so there are 5 springs in the back, and tighten the hell out of them. This way it takes a lot of work to dive at all. That, or blocking the trem is the only way to not get the bridge to go out of tune with doing a double-stop.
#4
Well, the double stop problem is upsetting but I still want to be able to dive down smoothly, without that extra space for pull ups. Pulling up is the real culprit here and since I don't need that extra semitone, I'm comfortable with not letting my bridge float. I play Joe Satriani, Metallica, Hendrix, Deep Purple, etc. I also want to retain the two springs under my guitar because I heard that adding more springs will not only stiffen the bridge but eat string vibrations and sustain.

Thanks for your input though. The most number of springs I've ever played with was three. It was on a strat-copy with a 6-screw vintage trem and diving/vibrato felt like a chore on it.
Last edited by Out of Exile at Apr 14, 2008,
#5
I have found that using 3 springs works great. Just adjust the 2 screws that hold the spring claw with a phillips head screw driver so that the bridge is parallel to the body.

I have not read up on the physics of it, but I would assume more springs and more tension would create more sustain. 3 is a nice balance though. It makes possible the Brad Gillis type of squeals - tapping the bridge arm and letting the tapping generate string vibration utilizing the spring gyration as a result of the tapping of the bridge arm.

Good luck with it.
#6
I have mine as option 2 and with 3 springs. It does not go out of tune when I use it. But do you have any locking tuners or anything at all to keep the tuning stable? I have sperzel and they work great.
#7
Quote by dissident52
I have mine as option 2 and with 3 springs. It does not go out of tune when I use it. But do you have any locking tuners or anything at all to keep the tuning stable? I have sperzel and they work great.


Yeah, the guitar comes with self-locking tuners, roller string trees and a graphite nut.
#8
I did take out one of my springs and while it did make diving easier, I noticed a slight detuning after a little use. I guess it's one of those "you can't have your cake and eat it too" things. But my strings have been fighting me, as I had to tune that guitar to E standard, and I keep it in Eb. So I can't know for sure.
#9
Quote by dissident52
I did take out one of my springs and while it did make diving easier, I noticed a slight detuning after a little use. I guess it's one of those "you can't have your cake and eat it too" things. But my strings have been fighting me, as I had to tune that guitar to E standard, and I keep it in Eb. So I can't know for sure.


I'll probably take the three spring idea into account. Since this is a 2-point trem, the bridge shouldn't be as stiff as a vintage 6-screw right?

By the way, you said you use option 2 (bridge flat on body). Can you still get the most out of divebombing? Does string action lower even further?
#10
Ok, I've learned through Google that more springs does increase sustain slightly. No problem there. A third spring will also help tuning stability more. In that case, I may still keep my bridge floating ONLY if that third spring will return the guitar to Zero Position. If not, then I'll really have to eliminate pull-ups. I really need to consult the SIS guitar repair guys in Guitar Center next Monday.
#11
Whenever I used the trem with the third spring, I never heard a difference in tuning after use.
#12
i would think that the intonation would be better if you adjusted the trem springs to be at a higher tension than the strings so that the bridge is not only flat on the body, but held there firmly.
Quote by Spoony_Bard
Depends on what she's on top of. If she's on top of my pizza I'm gonna have to scissor kick a bitch.


MY BUILD!
#14
Quote by forsaknazrael
How do you string your guitar? I have my Strat trem set to floating, and I have pretty good tuning stability.

Here:
http://www.stringthis.com/howtostringu.html
Do it like that.


Well, since my guitar already came with self-locking tuners, the strings were just slipped in and wound. Thanks for the info though. Very handy.
#15
Okay, well, try not to have too winds, then. On my SG, I have locking tuners - but I have next to no wraps on the posts.

Also, your guitar has string trees on the headstock, I would highly advise dabbing lubricant like Big Bends Nut Sauce, or even machine oil to the underside of the string tree, where the string makes contact. I don't know how well your roller string trees work, but it doesn't sound like they're doing their job.

What kind of trem is it? a 6 screw trem?
#16
Quote by forsaknazrael


What kind of trem is it? a 6 screw trem?



Two pivot posts. No screws needed.
#17
Wow, what the hell? I have a 6 screw trem, non locking (and crappy tuners) a graphite nut...and mine keeps tune fairly well! As long as you don't do huge dives where your strings would really loosen in the nut, that is. Any non locking guitar is going to go crazy out of tune after that. You can't expect FR-style dives...I only dive about a step or two. Mostly use my trem for flutters and raising the pitch a bit.
#18
Well i'm pretty sure adding a third string would solve the problem. I don't even do huge dives, but I noticed it went out of tune easier with only two springs, even after small vibratos.
#20
Quote by forsaknazrael

I completely missed that it only had two springs. I agree, 3 springs set up in a /|\ config would help a lot.


I see. All right, a third spring it is. I'm pretty sure the tech guys, who set this up for me for free, lubed the tuners, trees, nut and bridge saddles. I offered them my own lube but they said they already had the necessary stuff.