#1
hi
will someone tell me what is the scale and key of this progression
Bm- A - G - Gb - Bm - GB - G - Gb - Bm
they are all in barre form
i think the key is B but can not find fitted scale
#6
It's almost Bm, but for the presence of the major third in the Gb, which is the augmented fifth of Bm.

In terms of a scale to fit, you could play B minor over most of the progression (the tendency will be to resolve to the B anyway), and either avoid playing the 7th of the scale over the Gb maj (VERY dissonant diminished second interval against the A# in Gb maj), and sub in the natural 7th (the A# that matches up with the Gb maj). So you'd basically be playing in the Bm scale, but using the Gb maj chord tones over the Gb maj.

Hope this make sense, I'm still new to this theory business
Last edited by elgalad at Apr 14, 2008,
#7
Quote by Aaron_Yeo
Either B Minor or Gb Phrygian (but probably just B Minor).


Yep, Gb phrygian will work, but if you're resolving toward the B, then is it really Gb phrygian? I'm tending to towards no, but I'm not sure.
#9
Quote by dimebag1d
thanks so much
but that Gb some how does not fit to b minor
am i wrong?


No, you're spot on.

The Gb has an A# in it, whereas the B minor scale has an A (no A#)
#10
Call Gb F#. Then it is a very common minor progression involving the i, VII, and VI chords, which are completely within the B Natural Minor scale, and the commonly used Major V chord, which implies the B Harmonic Minor scale. This kind of thing is very common; in fact, it would be unusual to play the minor v chord rather than the major V chord.

Bm-i
A-VII
G-VI
F#-V

Yes, Gb and F# have the same pitch. In fact, F# is the more correct name here.
#11
so is this progression technically okay?
though it sounds okay while playing
can you describe it a little
thanks
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Call Gb F#. Then it is a very common minor progression involving the i, VII, and VI chords, which are completely within the B Natural Minor scale, and the commonly used Major V chord, which implies the B Harmonic Minor scale. This kind of thing is very common; in fact, it would be unusual to play the minor v chord rather than the major V chord.

Bm-i
A-VII
G-VI
F#-V

Yes, Gb and F# have the same pitch. In fact, F# is the more correct name here.


I was waiting for someone more knowledgeable than myself to come along and set everything straight. I can't believe I didn't think of the harmonic minor
#13
Quote by elgalad
I was waiting for someone more knowledgeable than myself to come along and set everything straight. I can't believe I didn't think of the harmonic minor
Just the one chord implies Harmonic Minor. The rest is pure B Natural Minor.
#14
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Just the one chord implies Harmonic Minor. The rest is pure B Natural Minor.


Yep, I get that

But I could have just said B natural minor over everything except the F#, where you'd use B harmonic minor. Would have saved me carping on about major this and diminished that
#16
I never used to think this hard about theory on guitar. I'm more acquainted with scales and intervals on a keyboard, although most people find it easier the other way 'round.
#17
Quote by dimebag1d
so is this progression technically okay?
though it sounds okay while playing
can you describe it a little
thanks

There's no such thing as "technically okay", if you like it go with it.
#18
I think he means conventionally correct, which does put limitations on things.


Unless you live and work by the chromatic scale. Then you're just being an arrogant ass, haha.

Until someone with quartertones steps in.
#20
As in, following the rules of musical theory. If you're writing solely within a B minor scale, for example, you can't play an F major tonic triad and expect it to sound normal. Conventions are there to guide what sounds normal and what doesn't. Not necessarily sounding good and bad, just 'acceptable.' So by being conventionally correct, you're conforming to the standards of musical theory.

Yah.
#21
Quote by Aaron_Yeo
As in, following the rules of musical theory. If you're writing solely within a B minor scale, for example, you can't play an F major tonic triad and expect it to sound normal. Conventions are there to guide what sounds normal and what doesn't. Not necessarily sounding good and bad, just 'acceptable.' So by being conventionally correct, you're conforming to the standards of musical theory.

Yah.


Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive. You can't "follow the rules" of music theory.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#22
Quote by Aaron_Yeo
As in, following the rules of musical theory. If you're writing solely within a B minor scale, for example, you can't play an F major tonic triad and expect it to sound normal. Conventions are there to guide what sounds normal and what doesn't. Not necessarily sounding good and bad, just 'acceptable.' So by being conventionally correct, you're conforming to the standards of musical theory.

Yah.

Nothing is "acceptable"; music theory is simply descriptive, and that argument is null. It doesn't have "conventional standards".

EDIT: Damn, Archeo got there before me.
#23
vowww much information
thanks
so do me favor would you tell me then how that chord can be there without concerning what scale we are in ? why it sounds okay ? any specific rule ?
#25
Quote by dimebag1d
vowww much information
thanks
so do me favor would you tell me then how that chord can be there without concerning what scale we are in ? why it sounds okay ? any specific rule ?



its part of the harmonic minor.. ???
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
#26
sorry
i mean then if we are in b minor how do we know we can use that f# chord from Amajor and it sound good though we are in b minor scale
#27
Quote by dimebag1d
sorry
i mean then if we are in b minor how do we know we can use that f# chord from Amajor and it sound good though we are in b minor scale

The dominant chord (F# in this case) is often made major in a minor key by raising the seventh (for B minor, this means A becomes A#). This is seen commonly and resolves nicely back to the tonic chord, and allows for a classical feel to the progression by allowing the use of the harmonic minor scale.