#1
Hope this is the right place to put this...

Before I get started, there is absolutly NO tingling or weird sensations in my arm...
And it's not my fretting hand.

Ok, I don't know if this is a newly developed habit, part of advancing as a guitarist, or just something I never really paid attention to till now. I've been playing guitar for 2 years now, and recently, my picking hand tends to get tired, not when I'm playing rhythms or anything, but when I start to pick very fast, I can do it, but it feels like my arm is tensing up and I'm using more energy than needed. Is this an actual problem? or is it my arm just needs to build up endurance and it will eventually go away. Like, when you first start to jog you get winded easily and in time you can run for longer without getting tired.

I hope thats what it is because I would hate to have to learn a whole new way to pick...
~~You are nothing. I am a God among men, creating the Universe before leaving you blinded and wandering.~~
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#2
fap more,

on a serious note your endurance should go up the more you play in this way
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#3
yea, indurace will increase with time. But for now, don't hold the pick too hard, relax your shoulders, stand straight etc. this will all increase confort while playing.

Origionaly Posted by CTFOD
Origionaly Posted by hownowbrowncow:
Get a new bicycle
Then you can ride it with no handlebars.

No handlebars.

No handlebars...
#4
Quote by rancidryan

on a serious note your endurance should go up the more you play in this way


To be honest that's generally bad advice. Yes, your playing should challenge you, but don't tense up your muscles to get fast speeds. Play comfortably at a tension-free state, but slowly building up speed.
#5
Happened to me too. I just learned to relax more when I played fast. It pretty much went away after that.
None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free.
#6
Quote by Ryioku
Hope this is the right place to put this...

Before I get started, there is absolutly NO tingling or weird sensations in my arm...
And it's not my fretting hand.

Ok, I don't know if this is a newly developed habit, part of advancing as a guitarist, or just something I never really paid attention to till now. I've been playing guitar for 2 years now, and recently, my picking hand tends to get tired, not when I'm playing rhythms or anything, but when I start to pick very fast, I can do it, but it feels like my arm is tensing up and I'm using more energy than needed. Is this an actual problem? or is it my arm just needs to build up endurance and it will eventually go away. Like, when you first start to jog you get winded easily and in time you can run for longer without getting tired.

I hope thats what it is because I would hate to have to learn a whole new way to pick...


are you anchoring ?
#7
I have a damaged ulnar nerve in my right arm. It's actually acting up really bad today. They want to do surgery and move the nerve out from in between my elbow joint. Good times! I hope you don't have this but you may want to see a neurologist.
#8
I anchor, but I don't at the same time.
I have my pinkey on the guitar body while i play up high, but I don't push down, they just sit there to keep my hand steady...
When I'm playing rhythm, I never anchor, It sounds clearer that way to me
~~You are nothing. I am a God among men, creating the Universe before leaving you blinded and wandering.~~
Letters to Zaya
#9
I think your arm is building stamina, and the sensation should go away in a while
if it dosent, try the classical position, some say it work like magic
#12
^ hahahah

seriously though, this is a biiig problem, making ou sound less fluent and, figuratively speaking, raping your tone..

an easy way to overcome the whole picking hand tension problem is to play anything you want to play on even dynamics, with all notes as soft as possible (but clean!)

you don't want to start this at high speed, but you can increase it quite fast, just go back down some bpm as soon as any note sounds louder than any other..

now, when you've got the bits down softly at the right speed and phrasing (this can pose a little bit bigger problem than you might expect because the pick is now pretty loose in your hand and hits the strings differently) , add dynamics, you can try on-beats first, to get used to accenting in different shades without loosing the relaxed state.

you do want more interesting dynamics than on-beats only, so take them away and reaarange the whole bit..
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