#3
So will having one pointing to my guitar and the other at my mouth be ok and not run into each other? Also is there a deal where I could get just the two mics w/o the pre for cheaper?
#4
They should be fine if you use both at the same time. Theres a Billy Bragg video i think of him using two condensers at the same time, recording an acoustic song. Idk about not having the pre, and just buying the nic.
#5
You'll definitely get some spill into the mics (i.e. there'll be some acoustic on the vocal track, and vice versa), but you can reduce this with careful mic placement. Plus, it's worth living with in my opinion, as (for me personally) I find I can get a far better, more natural performance when recording both at the same time. Not for everyone though.
There is poetry in despair.
#6
you will need a small mixer with phantom power, like a nice compact Tapco to power them but they are a nice set of mics for acoustic and I use them sometimes for singing.

My review of these mics:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=12472450&postcount=29

They do take in every bit of sound around them though so be sure to just record the guitar first, then the vocals...
Both mics on an acoustic guitar at the same time sound nice.
#7
Quote by BEAST89
So will having one pointing to my guitar and the other at my mouth be ok and not run into each other? Also is there a deal where I could get just the two mics w/o the pre for cheaper?


I said you need a preamp on top of that mike set. When you're done, you have $200 of decent home recorded sound.

I don't think you can get much cheaper without sacrificing a lot of quality in the sound.
Quote by keiron_d
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#8
The interface I have has preamps for the two mic ins. Perhaps two dynamic mics would work better if I planned on recording both at the same time?
#9
No. Not unless you plan on recording electric.

Condensers really are the way to go for acoustics.

I use an AKG perception on the guitar, then go back and do the vocals.
But ideally, I'd use two large diaphragm condensers.
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#10
If you already have a two input interface with preamps, then you'll fine without any additional preamps. Preamps on audio interfaces at the lower end of the market usually aren't amazing, but they certainly do the job and get a decent sound.
There is poetry in despair.
#11
Maybe I missed something but why are you trying to record vocals and guitar at the same time if you have an interface for the computer?
You could record one, then the other and in the end sync the two...which is the proper way to record in this situation...

Condenser mics, (Like the MXL 990/991) pick up a lot of sound but they are the best mic to choose when recording acoustic guitar being that its a fairly quiet instrument. This means your will get both audio sources, ( vocals and guitar) into both mics even though they are not that close together. For this reason, it's best to record in two takes then sync the two.
Dynamic mics need a lot of gain from the preamp and are not the best choice for acoustic guitars...

If you were to get that MXL set with the preamp you could run two mics into the preamp and run the two outputs into a Y cable which would convert it to TRS 1/8" which can run to your line in port, then set the recording software to record the L channel on one track and the R channel on another track. Reaper should have no problem multi tracking like that.

You said you have an interface with preamps on board, just use that, (assuming it has a phantom power supply). If it's a USB unit you should be able to record one mic on the L channel and the other on the R.
#12
If you can sing and play the song well (both parts) at the same time, that is often a desirable way to go. You will end up with a more natural sounding performance, and thus a more natural sounding recording. For acoustic music, the resulting 'spaciousness' of having the sound of the room and the instruments bleeding into each mic is often desirable also.

To minimize the amount of bleed, while still keeping the airy 'roomy' sound, you could go with a pair of figure-8 mics, but that will set you back some.

The key to using a pair of mics (non-figure-8, especially) is placement. Deal with the bleed and use it to your advantage. The problems are that you won't be able to edit one part without also editing the other. (it will sound funny if you do) The other challenge is watching for phase issues. This is when the sounds arrive at each mic in such a way that they sound fine on their own, but when mixed together sounds kind of 'honky' or 'nasally' or just 'funny.' Then you will have to move the mics a little bit to fix it. (often, only a couple of inches will make a huge difference).

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#13
Quote by moody07747
Maybe I missed something but why are you trying to record vocals and guitar at the same time if you have an interface for the computer?
You could record one, then the other and in the end sync the two...which is the proper way to record in this situation...




That's a better way to do it in terms of editing, as you'll have more flexibility when mixing. However, I often find that I can do a much better performance when playing at the same time, because it's just more natural.
There is poetry in despair.
#14
Well I guess if his mics don't pick up too much it should work.

I have always found it much easier to play an instrument and then lay down the vocals because I struggle playing and singing at the same time...