#1
Right,

two things. One's been bugging me because I can't get my thick head around it, the other one I've just been wondering about.

1) when they mention root notes of a key forming a bassline, does that refer to the notes being played if a guitar was strummed in that key?

2) my ibanez squeaks when I even touch the strings (and it's plugged into a switched on amp), but the peavey doesn't. Is it because it's active and the Peavey isn't?

3) anyone got any suggestions for names for the two? I've been racking my brains and have come up with now't so far. I'll post pics if anyone can tell me how to shrink the size of a jpeg.

Thanks
Jo
Ibanez SRX700
Peavey Grind 4 BXP NTB
#2
Name one slagathor
And try new batteries.

EDIT: I just named my peavey Liu Kang so keep in mind that it's taken.
Last edited by matt-attack at Apr 14, 2008,
#3
1) it refers to the lowest sounding note of the chord, or the "root" of the chord. It's where the chord begins at.

D-5
A-5
E-3

The third fret on the low E string of that power chord is your root note.
Last edited by acoginthesystem at Apr 14, 2008,
#4
Quote by acoginthesystem
1) it refers to the lowest sounding note of the chord, or the "root" of the chord. It's where the chord begins at.

D-5
A-5
E-3

The third fret on the low E string of that power chord is your root note.


not always. its the note the chord is almost based around. like a g major chord and d g and b in it but its still a g major chord.
Gear:

2007 Fender Highway 1 Stratocaster (MIA)

Mesa Boogie Express 5:25

Yamaha Acoustic

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#5
Quote by acoginthesystem
1) it refers to the lowest sounding note of the chord, or the "root" of the chord. It's where the chord begins at.

D-5
A-5
E-3

The third fret on the low E string of that power chord is your root note.


The root isn't the lowest note of the chord. It's the note the chord is based on such as the A in an A major chord. You can play a C with the notes C E and G. You can also play an inversion of a C like an E, G, and a C. The C isn't the lowest note in that chord, but it's still a C chord because the C is the root.
#6
Quote by strat_7
not always. its the note the chord is almost based around. like a g major chord and d g and b in it but its still a g major chord.



That 355 chord IS a G chord, and it's root note is G, wow, what a concept! Looks like dude was right.

Anyways, something electrical is up with your bass, loose jack, dead batteries, desoldered wiring, etc. If you're a n00b I'd let someone at a guitar store do the hard work for probably 20 bucks or something.

Name one of them Mojojauna
1992 Gibson Explorer (Seymour Duncan '59 neck, Custom Custom bridge)
Jackson King V Professional Std. (Seymour Duncan Invaders)
Mesa/Boogie Nomad 55
Mesa/Boogie 412 Recto. O/S Cabinet
Boss ME-50
MXR 10-Band EQ
#7
Quote by acoginthesystem
1) it refers to the lowest sounding note of the chord, or the "root" of the chord. It's where the chord begins at.

D-5
A-5
E-3

The third fret on the low E string of that power chord is your root note.



no dude, thats the bass note. the root note is what scale degree the chord is on. so in that case, G (3rd fret on E string) would be the root note AND the bass note. but if the chord was say:

G-5
D-5
A-3
E-3

then the ROOT note would be C (3 on A or 5 on G) and the BASS note would be 3 on E (which is a G).
#8
Quote by pugnapugnapugna
The root isn't the lowest note of the chord. It's the note the chord is based on such as the A in an A major chord. You can play a C with the notes C E and G. You can also play an inversion of a C like an E, G, and a C. The C isn't the lowest note in that chord, but it's still a C chord because the C is the root.


No, if the chord is an inversion, the root is the inversion note.

For example, Cb (which means 1st inversion) would have the root note E, even though it's a C chord.
Inversions change the root note.

Quote by grnday1236
no dude, thats the bass note. the root note is what scale degree the chord is on. so in that case, G (3rd fret on E string) would be the root note AND the bass note. but if the chord was say:

G-5
D-5
A-3
E-3

then the ROOT note would be C (3 on A or 5 on G) and the BASS note would be 3 on E (which is a G).


No, in that case, the root would be G, and the chord would be Cmaj/G. The bass note would be G.
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#9
so it doesn't seem like there's a rule of thumb for what the root note is for a chord. So that means I have to learn.... oh well..

and the jack seems a little loose. When I plug in, it crackles like anything which doesn't happen with the peavey. Wasn't sure either way tho.

Thanks
Ibanez SRX700
Peavey Grind 4 BXP NTB
Last edited by mojobanana at Apr 14, 2008,
#10
Yeah, there is. It's basically the lowest note of the chord.

At least, that's what the bass is meant to play (if it's root note bashing).

For example - Eminor = E.
F# with a G in the bass = G.

Simple as that .
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#11
The root note is the note that the scales key is based off of. So if you have a GMaj. chord the root would be the g
#12
So does that mean that every note is in every chord?

And if you had a bass line (not just playing the root notes) based on A maj you'd start at A (open third string) and end at A (2nd fret on 1st string) (sorry if I've got the strings the wrong way round)...
Ibanez SRX700
Peavey Grind 4 BXP NTB
#13
Quote by mojobanana
So does that mean that every note is in every chord?

And if you had a bass line (not just playing the root notes) based on A maj you'd start at A (open third string) and end at A (2nd fret on 1st string) (sorry if I've got the strings the wrong way round)...


What do you mean? You can put any note into any chord.

Whether or not it sounds good is entirely subjective.

So if you played an A major scale, you would get A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#, A. What is your question?
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#14
I'm just confused. I was thinking about it earlier and kinda thought it was the note the chord was based around, but I'd read something (which I think I misread) which is why I asked the question.

I'll learn. Ta.
Ibanez SRX700
Peavey Grind 4 BXP NTB
#15
Basically, just think of it as the lowest note in the chord. If the lowest note isn't the usual one in a major triad (for example, E,G,C) then play, even though it isn't the chord note, the lowest note.

The root note is the lowest note.
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#16
Quote by Nutter_101
No, in that case, the root would be G, and the chord would be Cmaj/G. The bass note would be G.



Noooo... it's only a C powerchord with the fifth in the bass. The root note is C. The bass note is G.
#17
Quote by grnday1236
Noooo... it's only a C powerchord with the fifth in the bass. The root note is C. The bass note is G.


Actually, it's a quadruple stop, but lets not get picky.

The root is G. The root of a chord is the lowest note in it. I've been studying music theory for quite a few years now, I do know what I'm talking about.
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#18
Nutter is right. If a chord is inverted, for all intents and purposes, the bass note (a G in a Cmaj7/G chord, for example) is the root note.

Also, keep in mind that Whinny Thistlebolt is taken for a name...