#1
I was writing a chord progression in the key of E and added E notes into the III. So it's a g with e in it what would i call this? G6 or somthin?
#3
"III of E is G#m." Why is this?, sorry if i sound stupid or redundant, but I am just now getting into theory and what not.
#4
Maj = W W H W W W H

key of E
E F# G# A B C# D#

G# is the iii
it minor because to be in key you would play G# B D#
the 'B' being the minor 3rd of G#
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Last edited by victoryaloy at Apr 14, 2008,
#6
victoryaloy's got the right idea, but there's also a C# and D#. Thus making the iii G# B D#. With a D natural it would be a iiidim.

However, this depends entirely on whether it's E major or E minor. If it's in E minor, you are correct in saying that the III is a G major(and I'm guessing you're talking about E minor).

Short answer: yes, a G major with an E thrown in can be called a G6.

Less short answer: Depends on context. In many cases, calling it a G6 would be fine, but if say the E is the bass note, it could be a G6/E or an Em7. There are countless variables and a lot of the time it's ambiguous and a chord can go by more than one name.
#8
Quote by grampastumpy
victoryaloy's got the right idea, but there's also a C# and D#.


thanks
i fixed it. i didn't realize..
i was saying it right as i was typing but i forgot to hit the '#'


What makes a minor a minor and a major a major?


its based off the third..
but theres also more to triads than that

check out the MT sticky.. its all written out
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#9
They're pretty much the north and south of key-based music. I'd definitely recommend reading the theory sticky(in my sig). A major scale consists of the scale degrees 1 2 3 4 5 6 7. In C, that's C D E F G A B. A (natural) minor scale consists of 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7(C D Eb F G Ab Bb in C minor). If you play both scales, you'll note that they sound pretty different. This is because of the minor 3rd, minor 6th, and minor 7th in the minor scale(b3, b6, b7). Something in a major key has something at least vaguely resembling the tonality of a major scale and likewise for the minor keys. That's the gist of it, still go read the sticky, I wasn't too thorough.