#1
Alright I got a few questions for you players.

1)Improvisation: speed. With improvising, I can only play melodically and with feeling if I don't go too fast, which results in most things I play sounding bluesy. The faster I go the more it sounds like a scale and the less it sounds like a melody, and this really hurts when I want to improv over non-bluesy or speedy things. I use at the moment the minor pentatonics and dorian mode when improving over minor things, if it matters. The pentatonic scale I know sounds quite bluesy itself but I also know it can be used for metal kinds of things too, but how? Any tips? Also, does the speed in improv just come over time or is there anything I can do to learn it better/faster?

2)Identifying the key of songs without a natural ear: any tricks?
#2
1. The actual technique of speed requires a lot of practice. Make sure you can alternate pick. Repeated for emphasis: Make sure you can alternate pick!

As far as being able to tastefully integrate speed into your playing, it requires a lot of experience. Mess around a lot. When you're alone, so what if your playing sounds wanky?

If you want to play over metal riffs, learn the Natural and Harmonic Minor scales as well as some metal solos.

I also suggest the "learn to solo" link in my thread. Don't click "melodic control," though. I also suggest the theory link in my sig.

I often use speed as a way to climax a solo (Tornado of Souls) or just to add a quick flurry of notes. I find these effective as they are still fast, but they show taste as well.

2. That requires perfect pitch which generally cannot be learned. However, relative pitch, the ability to recognize intervals, is vital and can be learned.
#4
Thanks for the early answers! And of course I know how to alternate pick :p, I naturally economic pick everything. Also, besides playing faster, are there any techniques to make something sound more like rock or metal than blues or something?
#5
Quote by CloserToTheSun
Thanks for the early answers! Also, besides playing faster, are there any techniques to make something sound more like rock or metal than blues or something?

It's mainly in your phrasing, dynamics and attack. Certain rhythms for backing you while you solo help to suggest a style as well - galloping low E's would suggest something more along the lines of hard rock or metal, for example.
#6
Quote by CloserToTheSun
I naturally economic pick everything.
That will work as well, but economy picking only matters when you're changing strings; if you're on the same string then you alternate pick no matter which style you prefer.

I'll assume you have decent technique and already know this, but some people do need to hear that.


To noobs reading this thread, learn alternate picking before you get fancy with economy or sweep picking. It's by far the most important speed technique.
#9
Quote by CloserToTheSun
Alright I got a few questions for you players.

1)Improvisation: speed. With improvising, I can only play melodically and with feeling if I don't go too fast, which results in most things I play sounding bluesy. The faster I go the more it sounds like a scale and the less it sounds like a melody, and this really hurts when I want to improv over non-bluesy or speedy things. I use at the moment the minor pentatonics and dorian mode when improving over minor things, if it matters. The pentatonic scale I know sounds quite bluesy itself but I also know it can be used for metal kinds of things too, but how? Any tips? Also, does the speed in improv just come over time or is there anything I can do to learn it better/faster?

2)Identifying the key of songs without a natural ear: any tricks?


Speed is a by product of accuracy. Play correctly, you will speed up. Most of the world would rather listen to someone melodic than someone frantically jerking something off over a progression, ( yes I know that is sacrilege to say round here, but it's true.) The majority of the world aren't guitarists and truly couldn't care less. If they did the charts would be full of fret wankers. It isn't..

Practice a bunch of relative pitch tricks. Try to ascertain the lowest comfortable note you can sing and learn what it is. Then relate things you hear to that note. Works for me 80% of the time, sore throats permitting
#10
Quote by RichieJovie
Speed is a by product of accuracy. Play correctly, you will speed up. Most of the world would rather listen to someone melodic than someone frantically jerking something off over a progression, ( yes I know that is sacrilege to say round here, but it's true.) The majority of the world aren't guitarists and truly couldn't care less. If they did the charts would be full of fret wankers. It isn't..

Practice a bunch of relative pitch tricks. Try to ascertain the lowest comfortable note you can sing and learn what it is. Then relate things you hear to that note. Works for me 80% of the time, sore throats permitting


Yeah, but "Hey There Delilah" is a chart-topper.

...I don't wanna sit on simple chords, either....
That song's so gonna replace Stairway for n00bs, I swear.
Gore AND Core; unite!