#1
I happened to come across a set of fully wired set of Custom Shop 69's all ready to go with the switch and knobs on ebay and suffered from an impulse buy. Now I've just got to put them in my strat and solder them up to the jack and ground it.

I have a tiny bit of knowledge and experience soldering- enough that I'll be able to handle desoldering the old set and installing the new one. But, I don't have an iron or anything, so I have to go to radioshack or someplace and get what I need. All I'm asking really is what is the cheapest iron that's going to do the job, and what kind of solder should I use, and any tips and info you think I should know.
Survivor of the St. John's Lockdown
Quote by SG thrasher

The thread-starter is a legend.
Seriously, who thinks "Shit, i'm gonna die, BRB, Ima' tell UG."?

Quote by The_Paranoia

Congratz man, you are a true, American Hero.
Go Schneiderman!

Gun Facts: Educate Yourself
#2
go to the store and find the cheapest iron. they should all work.
Gear

82' Gibson Les Paul w/ EMG KFK
Schecter Limited Edition C-1 Artist
Fender Fat Strat
B-52 AT100 Head
B-52 AT100 Cab
Blackstar ht-distx
Boss NS-2
Boss TU-2
#3
15-30 watt would work. I have a 25 watt one. Which is really nice, it gets hotter but it gets the job done quicker, but you have to be more careful not to take to long making the joints.

As for the solder get some rosin core solder. I got the biggest roll at radioshack I could find, cause I do a decent amount of soldering, but you really dont use that much for an individual job.

Theres also silver solder that you can get. But this does not flow nearly as easy as the rosin cored stuff. The silver stuff usually just makes nicer prettier joints. lol
-------------------------------
Faded Gibson SG Special - Black ice mod
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B-52 AT 112
Ted Weber Mass100 attenuator
EHX Small Clone
EHX Metal Muff
DIY Modded tubescreamer
Dunlop 535Q Wah
Wax Potting tutorial
#4
I find the cheaper ones have issues heating up and have crappy tips. They likewise only tend to melt small diameter solder. They are however easy to control and work well for PCB work. I currently use a Sears 150/400watt gun that heats at 400 and solders at 150. These are actually better due to the fact they heat the joint instantly and are less likely to cause damage. If you're new to soldering though, they can be tough to control and outright dangerous. However, they are much better for working on things like amp grounds that use heavy gauge wire.

My advice: Get a cheap Radioshack gun and learn with it. Buy the thin, PCB electronic rosin core solder. Also get some flux to clean the joint before soldering. DO NOT BUY ACID CORE SOLDER! It does not conduct electricity well and it's residue is highly corrosive. Once you've done a few jobs and know how to solder well enough, step up to a high powered soldering gun. While 25 is enough, it can make working on pots and some thicker wire hard, and will not melt heavier gauge solder. It's also more likely to damage things like pots due to the time it takes to heat a joint.
#5
Get a 25W Weller. They're not the cheapest (but not expensive either), but they will last a long time. I've been using the same one for a few years now.
#6
don't go cheap on an iron. I used to use a radio shack soldering iron and after getting a nice weller with base station I found out how much I was missing all those years. Now making good joints is easy as the tip evenly heats up.
#7
This thread ended up being useless because a guy lent me his soldering gun, which was like 250/400 or something like that. Heated up in an instant and made the job go real easy.

Once I got the pickups in I made sure to test them first before stringing up and it's a good thing I did, because whoever arranged the pickups with the pots and switch and everything had the switch wired backwards. The neck was on the bridge position and the bridge was on the neck position. That was an easy fix, just swapped those wires.

I could not be more pleased with the CS 69's. If I had the means I'd put up soundclips but the best I could do now is record with the built-in mic on my laptop and you just don't want to hear that. I'd also take pictures to show you my mint green pickguard with relic'd pickup covers and knobs on my Sunburst strat, but my camera's broken and I won't have a new one for a while.
Survivor of the St. John's Lockdown
Quote by SG thrasher

The thread-starter is a legend.
Seriously, who thinks "Shit, i'm gonna die, BRB, Ima' tell UG."?

Quote by The_Paranoia

Congratz man, you are a true, American Hero.
Go Schneiderman!

Gun Facts: Educate Yourself
#8
Quote by Schneiderman
This thread ended up being useless because a guy lent me his soldering gun, which was like 250/400 or something like that. Heated up in an instant and made the job go real easy.

Was it a Craftsman gun by chance, with a light in it? If it is, it was 150/400, and the one I default to all my soldering jobs.
#9
^Yeah I think that was the one.
Survivor of the St. John's Lockdown
Quote by SG thrasher

The thread-starter is a legend.
Seriously, who thinks "Shit, i'm gonna die, BRB, Ima' tell UG."?

Quote by The_Paranoia

Congratz man, you are a true, American Hero.
Go Schneiderman!

Gun Facts: Educate Yourself
#10
Quote by Schneiderman
^Yeah I think that was the one.

What I use. QUALITY kit, but pricey. (I got mine as a gift, but it was $70 IIRC)
#11
adjustable iron... the temp for doing switches is vastly different than the temp for grounds on the pot housing.

but a 25w will work if you're quick about it.
What I play:
CustomShop '51 Nocaster Relic
'88 "C" neck Clapton Strat
'08 Strat HSH
Fender Princeton Recording Amp
Boss Micro-BR
#12
ok....so for comparison please-

i just bought a 60 iron watter cause i heard it was better to have a higher temp for pickup lead wires to pot...is that true? Also, i bouht 60/40 solder with resin core right? I'm searching interdnet

also -if you screw up can you unsolder by heating it back up and wiping off?

i'm replacing humbuckers in my 05 MIM Strat
tnx
#16
Kind of along the same line of questioning - didn't want to make a new thread. I'm going to replace the bucker in my Peavey and was wondering if there was a good method for practicing soldering.

Anyone have any tips? I would like to screw around with it a bit before I make my final solders...
"If you tell anybody about these trees.. I WILL CUT YOU!!" - Bob Ross

Gear
Ibanez RG470 | '87 Peavey Predator LMT
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My Band - Under the Blade
#17
I'm obviously not the expert but I would think you could find an old piece of metal - a relatively clean block of iron would be ideal I would think. Like a horseshoe or tool etc. Then get some conducter wire like that in the guitar out of an old or broken stereo or other electronics or just buy some and then start practicing from there. Also you don't want to be holding the pickup wire while the solder cools so have all that propped up or taped in place before you start. heat. melt. backoff.

don't listed to me i haven't even started yet.
#18
OK...this is coming from someone with professional experience (I have worked for various companies building devices from radar detectors to space shuttle parts).

If you want cheap, get whatever from Radio Shack. But buy extra tips in various sizes, cause they suck.

None of this stuff below is cheap, but I thought I would add it in in case someone is looking for top of the line stuff.

A. Iron : Weller. Get a temperature controlled one. I've had mine since 1981 and it still works. And with the same tips.
B. Solder : 63/37. 60/40 works fine but 63/37 melts at a lower temperature, which is good if you are going to be soldering sensitive parts. Its what NASA uses. Use the thin stuff.
C. Solder Wick as well as a solder sucker. As for the solder sucker, get the heated kind. If you wanna go whole hog, get one that comes with its own vacuum. Not cheap.

And it might also be a good idea to get some small tweezers. And Orange sticks