#1
I am 17 years old and I have a dream of becoming a guitar teacher
Of course that probably sounds pretty stupid, but I have been playing ever since I was 10 and would love to be able to pass on all of my knowledge
SO! To any teachers out there-
Whats teaching like?
Are there any ways to practise teaching other than teaching real people(ie internet)
#2
Learn modes, teach modes, such is the key to looking professional,

and even a lot of the talented players don't know them.

When your skill comes into question infront of a student, whip out the cold fish slap that is theory.
#3
Quote by Atsuu
Learn modes, teach modes, such is the key to looking professional,

and even a lot of the talented players don't know them.

When your skill comes into question infront of a student, whip out the cold fish slap that is theory.


No. Ignore modes completely until you have a solid grasp of the major scale and diatonic harmony.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
I'm assuming you have a teacher that you're learning from. When you're at lessons, pay close attention to how he/she teaches you - what methods do they use to describe concepts, how do they assign work for you to do during the week, how structured is their teaching, etc. Examine these aspects and think about what aspects of your teacher's style you find useful or unhelpful, and think about how to use the good aspects and improve upon the bad ones.

I teach undergrads at college level, and can tell you that the best way to learn how to teach is to start doing it. You may or may not be much cop to begin with, but it won't take much time for your methods to improve, especially if you have a passion for helping people to learn.

Apart from that, just make sure you know as much about music as possible. You will have to answer common questions as well as the occasional one from left field. The more you know, the easier this will be.

#6
You will soon find out if you know what you are talking about.
Teaching means that you need to be able to convert some complicated concepts into simple to understand bite size lumps.
You also need to know how to pitch things to individuals and alter course if they are not coping with the materials.
Can you organise all you know into a linear learning curve and make sure it is both funa dn interesting.
Possibly most importantly can you leave your ego behind and not turn lessons into a look at me and how much I can play sessions, they teach nothing to anyone and are a pit fall most guitar teachers fall into.
If you can then you will need to learn how to plan lessons and have enough source material to work from.
#7
Quote by Skullmage4
I am 17 years old and I have a dream of becoming a guitar teacher
Of course that probably sounds pretty stupid, but I have been playing ever since I was 10 and would love to be able to pass on all of my knowledge
SO! To any teachers out there-
Whats teaching like?
Are there any ways to practise teaching other than teaching real people(ie internet)

Its great fun. Teaching over the internet would be hard.
#8
Quote by elgalad
the best way to learn how to teach is to start doing it.


+1

If you wait until you feel like you're totally ready and prepared and what-not, you might never start. Jump in. People skills first, your student's playing skills next, your own playing skills last.

Don't travel to students' houses. You don't know what you're getting yourself into, on so many levels.

Don't over-charge, but don't sell yourself short and under-charge. Be realistic about who you are and what you have to offer, and price yourself accordingly.

Be professional. Have a proper spot set up where you can teach. Make it look nice. Keep it tidy. Give it a musical vibe to it, without it being too juvenile. Sure, your Cannibal Corpse and Dragonforce posters are cool and what-not, but if your student is 55..... they will hardly consider it motivating or professional.

Be careful about being alone with younger students. You don't want parents of your 12 year old student feeling uncomfortable about leaving them alone with you; nor do you want to invite the opportunity for allegations. Have your parents home and within earshot, or invite his/her parents to stay, etc. I can't think of a worse roadblock to any kind of a career involving teaching than allegations of that sort of misconduct. Even if nothing happens, these things can follow you around like a malevolent lost puppy. It's not happened to me, but I've seen it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
To teach in a school, yes. To teach privately in your home, no.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#11
Everyone has given some really great advice.

Really, all you have to do is stay one step ahead of your students.

If you don't already use a metronome or know how to use one effectively, I would recommend that.

Learn from other teachers (which is what you're doing here, so kudos to you for that!)
#12
you have to be able to explain things in an easy to understand manner. most beginner students will know nothing and probably have some bad technique issues that need to be addessed.

you have to be encouraging and patient as hell.

I don't think your age is a factor (negatively) but you will have to relate to students of all ages. fortunately, music is kind of universal that way. most guitar players can relate to one another even if they don't play the same styles.

be nice and polite to the parents of younger kids , because they are the ones paying you.
talk to them, be confident and discuss their childs lesson before they leave. end each lesson on a positive.

call music stores and teachers in your area , ask what they are charging. you don't want to be the highest, but being the lowest isn't always the best either.

remember, you are never going to get payed for all the hundreds of hours you've practiced, you have a talent that is of value and there is nothing wrong with being paid well to do it.
#13
i'm not the best teacher, first and foremost my patience is somewhat minimal. but i would recommend putting some of what you get paid back into your student however.

say your student has had 10 lessons of a period of 2 months (at lets say $15 a lesson, thats $150) and you notice their strings are getting nasty and they need to be changed. go get a nice pack of elixirs or something like that and make part of their next lesson (make sure its already lined up) on restringing a guitar. this is of course assuming their student is a noob and doesn't know how to. this will teach the student something simple they need to know AND put a nice set of strings on their guitar (don't do this everytime they need strings obviously)

but things like that will make it rewarding for the student as well. if the student is really interested and is doing their lessons and taking it seriously enough, why not reward them? little things like a strap, a cheap tuner, picks, capo etc. obviously don't spend all your money on them and give them a boatload of stuff everytime they come over. but it will definately encourage them to continue using you since how many teachers do you think would really do that for their students?
#14
Quote by z4twenny
i'm not the best teacher, first and foremost my patience is somewhat minimal. but i would recommend putting some of what you get paid back into your student however.

say your student has had 10 lessons of a period of 2 months (at lets say $15 a lesson, thats $150) and you notice their strings are getting nasty and they need to be changed. go get a nice pack of elixirs or something like that and make part of their next lesson (make sure its already lined up) on restringing a guitar. this is of course assuming their student is a noob and doesn't know how to. this will teach the student something simple they need to know AND put a nice set of strings on their guitar (don't do this everytime they need strings obviously)

but things like that will make it rewarding for the student as well. if the student is really interested and is doing their lessons and taking it seriously enough, why not reward them? little things like a strap, a cheap tuner, picks, capo etc. obviously don't spend all your money on them and give them a boatload of stuff everytime they come over. but it will definately encourage them to continue using you since how many teachers do you think would really do that for their students?


thats a nice sentiment, but when you have 40 + students it not really possible. Plus they rarely appreciate as much as you would think.

I agree you should teach them how to change strings.....but let them buy the strings.

Dont get me wrong, for the right student, it may be worth doing some extra things for. But in my experience your often wasting your own time and money. I used to things like make nice chord charts, or scale charts. I even made a few backing tracks. You know what happened...

did you practice to the backing tracks?..... .uhhhhhh wellll uhh I forgot.

wheres you scale charts. Either "uhh I lost it".... or "uhhh here it is"..... pulls out a ripped crinkled up piece of paper.

So, did you memorize any of those? .... " uhhhh no... but I learned a cool Children of Bodom lick from Ultimate Guitar"...... starts to play it...... its wrong and sounds horrible


hehe sorry for the rant. I've been teaching too long. But I love it, really!

actually when you do get a student thats into it, it can be quite rewarding.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 15, 2008,
#15
Quote by ThomasLantern
Everyone has given some really great advice.

Really, all you have to do is stay one step ahead of your students.

If you don't already use a metronome or know how to use one effectively, I would recommend that.

Learn from other teachers (which is what you're doing here, so kudos to you for that!)

Dude your music is awsome!!... if your in oshawa anytime soon or anywhere around there let me know
#16
Quote by Skullmage4
I am 17 years old and I have a dream of becoming a guitar teacher
Of course that probably sounds pretty stupid, but I have been playing ever since I was 10 and would love to be able to pass on all of my knowledge
SO! To any teachers out there-
Whats teaching like?
Are there any ways to practise teaching other than teaching real people(ie internet)


since i aint a teacher, all i can give u is THIS!!
http://www.guitarnoise.com/teaching.php
#17
Quote by GuitarMunky

did you practice to the backing tracks?..... .uhhhhhh wellll uhh I forgot.

wheres you scale charts. Either "uhh I lost it".... or "uhhh here it is"..... pulls out a ripped crinkled up piece of paper.

So, did you memorize any of those? .... " uhhhh no... but I learned a cool Children of Bodom lick from Ultimate Guitar"...... starts to play it...... its wrong and sounds horrible
HAHA...this is so me! But replace "scale charts" with "standards" and "Children of Bodum" with "Yngwie". Even the "starts to play it...its wrong and sounds horrible" sounds like me!

But this thread is helpful, I've been thinking about teaching beginner guitar/piano or theory for a while now. But I'd have to travel the student's houses probably*because of where I live* and axemanchris has pretty much scared the crap out of me with his "overflowing litterboxes in the attic in the middle of summer" stories.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#18


CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#19
Hey man I'm 16 and I have been teaching since 13 at a music school up the road. I suppose I don't have heaps of experience, but I do know that you learn plenty of things along the way, especially in terms of communication skills; which I believe are the most important factor of teaching (along with knowledge I guess). Maybe start off with teaching complete beginners, then work your way up to teaching intermediate and so on.

But anyway, I wish you the best of luck with it all!

Chris.
Last edited by G3Vai at Apr 19, 2008,
#20
For teaching, there's nothing really special you have to know. You just have to get out there and do it. As long as you appear to know what you are doing, and you teach the proper technique and everything, you will be fine. I've been teaching private lessons for about 2 years now and there's really nothing to worry about. It might seem a little intimidating at first, but once you get to know your students, it's just like giving your friends a quick tip.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#22
I might be a little behind on this post. Hopefully you've jumped in and have been able to teach. If not, I suggest starting with younger very beginner students. You can teach the basics and learn how to teach from there.
to find students in your area sign up with a site like www.LessonsCentral.com. You can post a free profile on the site to attract new students. List in the profile that you are looking for beginning students and be honest in your experience. The site can also help you schedule lessons and accept payments so you can concentrate on teaching.

Good luck!
#23
I did a litelteaching course on weekends so that I had a certificate.
I started teaching people in the years below me during school lunch times ($5 a lesson )
Then I started teaching people at home. Just beginners at the moment.
Its really fun and a lot of the students really do practise a lot. Its good to learn from your teachers. I have two guitar teachers, one is rather casual the other is awesome, 'cause he's such an expert in his field and he teaches at a music college and everything too.
but theyre nice!

also certificates are great, even if theyre like grade 2 jazz or something, if they say honours in big writing they're very impressive!
#24
Quote by jxb10
I might be a little behind on this post. Hopefully you've jumped in and have been able to teach. If not, I suggest starting with younger very beginner students. You can teach the basics and learn how to teach from there.
to find students in your area sign up with a site like www.LessonsCentral.com. You can post a free profile on the site to attract new students. List in the profile that you are looking for beginning students and be honest in your experience. The site can also help you schedule lessons and accept payments so you can concentrate on teaching.

Good luck!


That's right. Learn your trade by experimenting on the most vulnerable, young beginners, who won't have a clue if you are any good or not.

You might put put them off music for life, but hey, so what! this is all about YOU isn't it.

Most of the advice in this thread is appalling.

Worst of all was "all you need is to stay one step ahead of your pupils"
#26
Maybe they're not called that if you live somewhere else. In Canada, they'res a conservatory, RCM, which gives you qualifications and certificates for entering university, etc. They have ARCT, which enables you to teach guitar. However this is limited to classical guitar. They don't do anything with electric.

You could still teach on your own, and many do, but this is impressive, imo.
#27
Quote by R.Christie
That's right. Learn your trade by experimenting on the most vulnerable, young beginners, who won't have a clue if you are any good or not.

You might put put them off music for life, but hey, so what! this is all about YOU isn't it.

Most of the advice in this thread is appalling.

Worst of all was "all you need is to stay one step ahead of your pupils"


I'm assuming if someone wants to teach they pretty much are experienced and knowledgable in music. I may be giving someone too much credit but hey teachers have to start somewhere.
Teachers are going to learn from their students always, regardless of age or skill level. I was merely suggesting start with the skill level you know you can teach something. If he can't teach a beginner he certainly can't teach a more advanced student. If the instructor is upfront and honest about just starting to teach and the student is okay with that, I don't see the issue.

Instead of shooting down our advice, you should possibly help him out with some of your own.
#28
Ofcourse you can write columns about theory or techniques on UG but believe me: teaching a real person is a whole different experience than teaching anonymous people on the internet. Next to that there also is a difference in teaching a 17 year old and teaching an 8 year old.
I sold my soul for Rock 'n' Roll

Quote by CSguitarvocal
you've just proven that you're the most ignorant fuck on this website...

Thank you
Quote by darknessfan
Whenever I sit down to play guitar, I always need to pee in like 3 minutes. Is this weird?

Owned
#29
What happens if your going to teach someone older than you xD

I want to teach my friend how to play acoustic, and i intend to do that when shes next at home, so instead of me wasting thread space, any ideas people?

On what songs i could teach, etc
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#30
Quote by jxb10
I'm assuming if someone wants to teach they pretty much are experienced and knowledgable in music. I may be giving someone too much credit but hey teachers have to start somewhere.
Teachers are going to learn from their students always, regardless of age or skill level. I was merely suggesting start with the skill level you know you can teach something. If he can't teach a beginner he certainly can't teach a more advanced student. If the instructor is upfront and honest about just starting to teach and the student is okay with that, I don't see the issue.

Instead of shooting down our advice, you should possibly help him out with some of your own.


Yes, your point in first sentence above is fair enough, I'd just come from another thread where someone with two years playing experience was wanting to set up as a teacher.

Nevertheless, I'm astounded at the seemingly general attitude prevalent that armed with three or four years playing experience and having often a completely inflated and uninformed opinion of their own expertise, so many feel as though they are ready or qualified to teach.

Teaching, at the very least, requires a level of expertise in the subject matter. Of course there are many other factors as well, but expertise is bottom line. It requires much more than mere expertise in performing certain styles, it requires a good general grasp of music as a whole, practical, theoretical, aural and stylistic, in fields outside just the guitar. After all people are paying in expectation that the teacher has such expertise, and are often putting much more at risk than just their back pocket. With over twenty years of teaching experience I can relate a host of horror stories arising from having to repair damage done to young musicians by the poor teaching practises of others. I agree strongly with a previous post that beginners, most especially young beginners, are not the ones to develop raw teaching skills upon. These pupils require a expert overview of all technical and musical issues involved as well as a mature overview of the future possible options that are to be made available to the pupil.

I don't generally accept that playing and learning for less than 5 to 8 years qualifies one as an expert (although freaks can of course occur, just to prove the rule).

So to those wanting to teach professionally I offer this general advice.

Before considering teaching

If possible study guitar with at very least two different and competent teachers for a minimum of 5 years.

As already stated, study music history and theory so that at the very least you are not intimidated by any serious text on the subjects. For instance, if you find you anything new or can't understand anything in the stickies attached to this forum you definitely are not ready to teach.

Having specialist Conservatory or College qualification in music or teaching often, but not always, ensures such bases are covered.

I'll finish with a quote from Fernando Sor

" As long as you design for yourself alone, or for those whose judgment is in relation with yours, do what you please, nobody has anything to say against it; but if you would expose your productions to the public, consult connoisseur, to ascertain beforehand if they are worthy of it; and, especially, if you compose a didactic work on the art in which you think yourself learned, be certain that you know what you engage to speak of. Respect the public, and do not render them the dupes of your ignorance. If you are obliged to teach, follow one of the methods that proves the author to have reasoned well: your modesty will make you play a much more honourable part than that which you prepare for yourself by the foolish vanity of pretending to have created a style."

Fernando Sor, Method for Guitar Circa 1830