#1
I keep hearing it lately and I'm not so sure for what it stands for. Is it a system to finding the flats and sharps of various keys? Please help me.
#3
Quote by American
I keep hearing it lately and I'm not so sure for what it stands for. Is it a system to finding the flats and sharps of various keys? Please help me.


It's part of a scale...do-re-mi-fa-so-la-ti-do
#4
Go watch The Sound of Music.
Dissonance is Bliss


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#5
isn't it the sounds from a scale? do ra something something something...... do ?

lol
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#7
It's a series of words that refer to degrees of a scale.

Do - Re - Mi - Fa - So - La - Ti
I - ii - iii - IV - V - vi - viio
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#8
do re mi fa sol la si do = C D E F G A B C
its used standardly in classical teaching and outside your america
#9
Quote by RockFreak000
C D E


So you're saying it's just another name system for notes except the standard c,d,e,f...?
Why have two? o.0
#10
Quote by American
So you're saying it's just another name system for notes except the standard c,d,e,f...?
Why have two? o.0


It's European. It actually came first.
#11
read the post by moonboots. only correct post thus far. unless you use fixed do solfege, which is damn stupid.
#12
Quote by American
So you're saying it's just another name system for notes except the standard c,d,e,f...?
Why have two? o.0


It's a way of referring to the ___ note of ANY major scale, not just C,D,E, etc... "Do" refers to the first note (I), "Re" the second (ii), "Mi" the third (iii), and so on. So these Solfege syllables can be applied to any major scale.
#13
its a major scale but it could be any key, depends what key you sing it in why is everyone saying c.
#14
Quote by webbtje
It's European. It actually came first.


I knew it was them. Uterrly impractical and confusing. C,d,e,f... makes actual sence. Such douchebags.
#15
Quote by American
I knew it was them. Uterrly impractical and confusing. C,d,e,f... makes actual sence. Such douchebags.


No, Solfege really does make sense if you use the correct definition of it. It can be used for a C scale, where it would stand for C,D,E, etc. But it can be used for any other scale too. If you're in the key of G, the major scale is G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G. So Do would be G, Re is A, etc.
#16
Quote by MoonBoots432
It's a series of words that refer to degrees of a scale.

Do - Re - Mi - Fa - So - La - Ti
I - ii - iii - IV - V - vi - viio

first time i hear this, so i checked wikipedia:

There are two main types of solfège:

1. Fixed do, in which each syllable corresponds to a note-name. This is analogous to the Romance system naming pitches after the solfège syllables, and is used in Romance and Slavic countries, among others.
2. Movable do, or solfa, in which each syllable corresponds to a scale degree. This is analogous to the Guidonian practice of giving each degree of the hexachord a solfège name, and is mostly used in Germanic countries.
#17
Quote by MoonBoots432
It's a series of words that refer to degrees of a scale.

Do - Re - Mi - Fa - So - La - Ti
I - ii - iii - IV - V - vi - viio


This guy is right.
#18
Quote by American
I knew it was them. Uterrly impractical and confusing. C,d,e,f... makes actual sence. Such douchebags.


Grow the fuck up, you close-minded little prick.
#19
Quote by American
I knew it was them. Uterrly impractical and confusing. C,d,e,f... makes actual sence. Such douchebags.



Nationalistic douche.


It's confusing to us, cause we didn't make it. Doesn't mean it doesn't make any sense, though. But yes, as has been said...many times over, it's the intervals of a scale, blah blah...

EDIT: It's "sense", also, not "sence"..
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#20
You really only encounter the Solfege methods if you're learning beginner theory or doing ear training.

It's a cool simple method to help you recognize pitches.
#21
Quote by webbtje
Grow the fuck up, you close-minded little prick.

+1

It's also a Nirvana song, for anyone who cares.
All zero of you.
#22
Quote by American
I knew it was them. Uterrly impractical and confusing. C,d,e,f... makes actual sence. Such douchebags.


I hope you were kidding... Non-Americans don't read this post and take from it that all Americans are like this
Stop whining and learn your theory!

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#23
Quote by American
I knew it was them. Uterrly impractical and confusing. C,d,e,f... makes actual sence. Such douchebags.



It's just as practical. Depending on the situation even more. You do realize you'll never be able to communicate with Spanish or French musicians if you keep that attitude up? I'm in a conservatory studying classical guitar in Spain and guess what? In our theory class we study what's called American cypher, your letter system, so that we can communicate with you, not ignore you.


If you're going to call me a douchebag, then at least do it backing up your opinion with something more than just absolutely pointless patriotism.
#24
I actually just spotted the troll's name.
American.
Best ignore him, he's only here for one reason.
#25
Quote by kthxbi
I actually just spotted the troll's name.
American.
Best ignore him, he's only here for one reason.


No, he's actually made some sensible posts before. He's not a troll, he's just a twat.
#26
Quote by MoonBoots432
It's a series of words that refer to degrees of a scale.

Do - Re - Mi - Fa - So - La - Ti
I - ii - iii - IV - V - vi - viio


haha Not really

It's simple, it are notes just other names.
A: la
B: si (or ti)
C: do
E: re
and so on
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#27
The person who posted the snip from Wiki has it right, among others above. Cortez0, you are thinking of the fixed sol-fa system, which is considerably less popular and less practical in this day and age, AFAIK.

The greatest use of the system is the tonic sol-fa system (the moveable one) where each scale degree matches with its own syllable. So, in the key of Eb, do would be Eb, re would be F, etc.

Where this is useful is especially in ear training while reinforcing the sound of the intervals. Of course, in ear training, you need to be able to identify these intervals and scale degrees in the context of any key - not just C.

It's also useful in sight-singing. (an extension of ear training) If you can visually identify intervals and scale degrees, and match them up with the solfegge syllables, you can sight-read (sight-sing) music written in any key.

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#28
I've learnt violin using solfa with normal notation and it is very useful, especially in sight reading as axemanchris said.

I also learnt to use it for remebering the semitones and tones in a scale. eg, for the major scale you know that there are semitones between mi and fa, and ti and doh. Using this information you can play the major scale starting on any note (well any instrument where you can see the tones and semitones like a piano,a violin or a guitar) without knowing the notes in the scales.

For the minor scale it starts on la (because the minor scale is the aoelian mode) therefore staying in the key of the relative major using notes like si (instead of soh) and fi (fa) for the accidentals. Again, this is very useful as it is like a formula for the scale so you do not need to know the notes of every scale, just the gaps between notes.

It also lends itself quite well when teaching modes.

I hope i've explained clearly (tell me if i havent)

12345abcd3
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at Apr 16, 2008,
#29
Quote by webbtje
No, he's actually made some sensible posts before. He's not a troll, he's just a twat.

Oh, really? I assumed it was one of those accounts where they name themselves how they're gonna act, and that his game was trolling nationalistic posts in every thread.
#30
To clear things up:
Take out the notes of any major scale and replace the note-names with "Do", "Re", "Mi", etc..
So, examples?
C-major: C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C | Goes: Do, Re, Mi, Fa, So, La, Ti, Do
F#-major: F#, G#, A#, B, C#, D#, F, F# | Goes: Do, Re, Mi, Fa So, La, Ti Do

Get it? :p
#31
Quote by webbtje
No, he's actually made some sensible posts before. He's not a troll, he's just a twat.

Yes, he is a twat.


Makes all normal Americans seem like dumbasses.


For shame.
#32
Quote by American
I keep hearing it lately and I'm not so sure for what it stands for. Is it a system to finding the flats and sharps of various keys? Please help me.


Based on my current knowledge - yes, it is a system for knowing flats and sharps of notes, the ones with the letter "i" on the name of the note (each name corresponds to a letter) will have a non-sharp/flat note after it.
#33
You americans use it completely different than us then.

For the place in a scale we use tonica, dominant, ....
I is tonica, V is dominant if you would like to know.
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#34
Quote by cortez0
You americans use it completely different than us then.

For the place in a scale we use tonica, dominant, ....
I is tonica, V is dominant if you would like to know.


In America,(and most other places tho idk where you live) Roman numerals are only used for chords. Other then that we use numbers 1-7 with ^ written above them(degree symbol). And words like tonic, supertonic, mediant, subdominant, dominant, submediant, and leading tone.

To TS: if you're still curious. solfeggio syllables were derived from a song called Hymn to St. John. Originally, it was only ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la. And it came from the lyrics:

Ut queant laxis resonare fibris
Mira gesto rum famuli tuo rum
Solve polluti
Labii reatum
Sancte Joannes
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