#1
From what I'v been reading here, it seems most everyone is in agreement that lessons are super helpful (of course assuming you don't get someone bad.)
My question is when I should get them?

I only started on bass 2-3 months ago, but I enjoy it a lot and have putting in a good deal of time. I have played violin and guitar off and on for 8-10 years, and didn't get into either of them nearly this much. Actually, since getting my bass I've been playing my guitar more as well.

While I'm sure theres a lot more i can learn on my own (a LOT ) I'm wondering whether or not lessons are worth it sooner to avoid learning bad technique etc.

Thanks
#3
well I don't play bass, but I'm getting guitar lessons and they've improved my playing a-hell-of-a-lot-fold, they're really useful, unless you get some teacher who is actually a rapist, that doesn't help...
#4
Quote by Flipaningage
well I don't play bass, but I'm getting guitar lessons and they've improved my playing a-hell-of-a-lot-fold, they're really useful, unless you get some teacher who is actually a rapist, that doesn't help...

yeah having a teacher who is a rapist will probably hinder any learning |:

Unless of course the lesson of the day is how to rape. Then you'll progress soon.

So at TS, don't worry. Rape just comes natural to some... wait?


But seriously if you want a more theoretical side, go to a teacher.
"Punk is a state of mind, and no one can take that away from you."
#5
The sooner you get lessons, the better. I had to (still do actually) spend a great amount of time trying to change my left hand technique because I had devloped bad technique on my own (and after six years of using it, it's hard to stop).

It's also imperrative to get a great teacher.
Proud Owner of a Fender Jazz 24 V

Private Simmons of the Red vs. Blue club. PM Fret13 to join.

Things to come:
Carvin or Trace-elliot rig
EBS Valvedrive (Newest edition )
#6
lessons are the best thing you can do man if you get a good teacher its way way worth it

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
#7
Yes. I was trained as a pianist for 4 years. I taught myself bass for 5 years, then got a few lessons by a well known teacher in the UK. He cleaned up my technique and identified flaws in not only my attack, but in my body whilst playing my instrument. I've become conscious of those faults and it instantly improved my playing.

Remember, don't be afraid to try out a few teachers. It's important to find one with which you feel comfortable with. Also, remember great players don't neccesarily equate to good teachers.
#8
If you are going to get a teacher, get one early on. This way you can start building the path to good technique, music theory etc and not have to spend the first part of your learning experience unlearning bad habits and misinformed knowledge.

And along with finding a good teacher, don't be afraid to cut the losses when you've outgrown a teacher as well. A good teacher should know when you've reached the point that they need to point you to another teacher or resource, even if your relationship as a student and teacher is good. But sometimes they will not make this call for a variety of reasons. If its not working for you, then its time to move on.
#9
Sooner the better, I think. I've been playing bass for 8 years and I'm just now looking at lessons. If I had it to do all over again I would have gotten lessons when I first started. If you take lessons now, you can lay a nice foundation for what you will teach yourself later on.
#10
In many cases, you don't need a BASS teacher as much as you do a MUSIC teacher. Thats my feel.

A BASS teacher will help you play cleaner, better, faster, all of that stuff. But if your technique is sound, progress is speed is something that really only can come with time. A large benefit of a BASS teacher is that they motivate you to practice your scales and challenge you technically. This is different from...

A MUSIC teacher teaches you theory, and the application of it. Lots of theory can be found online, but a good MUSIC teacher will teach you how to use that theory. That is something hard to find in books. Theory isn't specific to bass, a tritone will sound evil no matter what instrument you play on. This kind of teacher also should be able to motivate you to be better at whatever it is. Really, it doesn't matter terrible much what they play.

I don't want to say a BASS teacher is less useful, but the purpose of one is for sure different from a MUSIC teacher. I had 7 or 8 lessons from a guy named Ed Carter (he played for a couple Beach Boys songs). As far as technically playing bass, I am perhaps around the same level (perhaps faster) than he is. But he knows much more theory than I do. He told me what I need to do to get better. Things like reading music and ear training. I quit after those 7 or 8 because we agreed that I knew WHAT I needed to learn, I just needed to learn.

Most of you will disagree with me, but if your technique is sound, you don't NEED a teacher. Learn on your own. I'm not saying they are useless, but with the internet and places like UG around, it is fairly easy to get access to theory and stuff of that sort.
#11
A BASS teacher will help you play cleaner, better, faster, all of that stuff. But if your technique is sound, progress is speed is something that really only can come with time. A large benefit of a BASS teacher is that they motivate you to practice your scales and challenge you technically. This is different from...

A MUSIC teacher teaches you theory, and the application of it. Lots of theory can be found online, but a good MUSIC teacher will teach you how to use that theory. That is something hard to find in books. Theory isn't specific to bass, a tritone will sound evil no matter what instrument you play on. This kind of teacher also should be able to motivate you to be better at whatever it is. Really, it doesn't matter terrible much what they play

That makes me a bass-music teacher, cool.
Theory is so important and a lot of beginners don't seem to realize that.
IMO a good teacher should teach a balance of technique, theory, ear training, and how to play the music that the students are interested in.
Make sure he/she isn't just giving lessons to pay the bills in between gigs, but actually enjoys teaching. You should be able to tell that in one lesson.
#12
thanks a bunch to everyone, very helpful comments
Im 17 but not in high school, taking classes at community college. This summer/fall i think i see some music theory classes in my future
I guess I'll start looking at teachers around DC...and of course saving my cash
Anyone know of a specific teacher in the DC area that is uber?

thanks