#1
so i was playing the la grange solo one fateful day, and i couldn't get the pinch harmonics right. actually, at the time i didn't even know what pinch harmonics were. so i was messing around and i just layed the pinkie of my picking hand on the string and viola! weird squeaky sounds. so time passed, and i read about pinch harmonics. and i realized thats what i was doing. but i don't get why you have to hold your pick weird and everything when i just lay my pinkie on the string to get the exact same sound. for me its way easier. i was just wondering if there's a reason why i've never seen anyone else play them this way, and is there a reason not to?
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#2
When you've done pinch harmonics for a while you don't even think about it, and IMO it's way easier to use your right thumb instead of another finger.
#3
Using another finger takes more effort than a normal pinch harmonic, its just more economical.
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#5
There's no reason not to.... it would get complicated when you figure out where every possible harmonic is for every string though... cause then you would have to move your pinky around... and blah. I just use my thumb, and sometimes my middle finger if it's odd. That's cool though. I don't think you have to hold your pick weird, well... I don't do it.
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#6
I use my index, and it works just as well as using the thumb. Actually, I can't even pull them off with it. It just works so much better using the index with my picking position.
Last edited by Whiskky at Apr 15, 2008,
#7
Actually, you are getting two different harmonics-producing techniques mixed up.

Lightly touching your finger on a spot on a string (Parts that are an "integer divisor of its vibrational length", i have discovered that it usually works on marked frets, with a few exceptions) produces an artificial harmonic. You dont need to do anything but lightly touch one of those areas on a string and pick it normally.

The technique that requires you to pick the string while lightly brushing it with the thumb on your picking hand is called a pinch harmonic. you can do this anywhere on the fretboard and on any string by fretting normally, and picking as described above.