#1
Do you think of it as notes (A, A#, B, etc.) or do you think of it as patterns? I had another thread about learning arpeggios and I got a lot of people telling me to learn the notes, not the patterns, and translate it to guitar. This seems like it would be impossible to think that fast when playing licks during a solo when you're brain is already going 1,000 times a second. Is this something that you can just learn to do by memorizing the fretboard? Discuss

EDIT: and if you are wondering why I started a new thread on this, it is because this seemed like a really good topic to talk about.
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Last edited by WlCmToTheJungle at Apr 15, 2008,
#2
i learn the patterns, but i understand what the notes are

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#3
kinda both; first patterns then numbers and notes. i'm still working on the numbers/notes part
#4
I see it as patterns but highlight some important notes: minor root, major root, respective sevenths.
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#5
why does other peoples opinion really matter???ok, its nice to get ideas, but really theres limited ways of discerning what youre playing, and remembering it...what works for one person, may not for another...so instead of discussing it, wouldnt it be more beneficial to your playing to try for yourself, and see which you find easier...
#6
I see scale degrees.
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#8
Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
Do you think of it as notes (A, A#, B, etc.) or do you think of it as patterns? I had another thread about learning arpeggios and I got a lot of people telling me to learn the notes, not the patterns, and translate it to guitar. This seems like it would be impossible to think that fast when playing licks during a solo when you're brain is already going 1,000 times a second. Is this something that you can just learn to do by memorizing the fretboard? Discuss

EDIT: and if you are wondering why I started a new thread on this, it is because this seemed like a really good topic to talk about.



telling you not to learn patterns = bad advice.

when I look at the fretboard, I can see both patterns and the notes. Ultimately there is alot you should be able to see. Anything that you can visualize on the neck and directly apply to music is a good thing. Patterns are especially helpful, dont let anyone tell you otherwise.


btw- this is a good topic to talk about
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 15, 2008,
#9
I see the patterns, and the notes. And whenever I am playing lead, I am always thinking at least three notes ahead of the note I'm currently at.
#10
Quote by GuitarMunky
telling you not to learn patterns = bad advice.

when I look at the fretboard, I can see both patterns and the notes. Ultimately there is alot you should be able to see. Anything that you can visualize on the neck and directly apply to music is a good thing. Patterns are especially helpful, dont let anyone tell you otherwise.


btw- this is a good topic to talk about



it wasn't NOT to learn the patterns, it was to learn the notes behind them.
My Gear:
Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster
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Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue
Teese RMC Picture Wah
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Korg Pitchblack
Schecter Omen 6
Dean Performer Acoustic

#12
Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
it wasn't NOT to learn the patterns, it was to learn the notes behind them.



well you said "notes NOT patterns".... that means one not the other. And I've often seen the "dont learn the patterns" advice, and assume thats where you are getting it from.

but yeah, ofcourse learning the notes on the neck can only help you.

The thing is your not just going to memorize all the notes. it takes time. Knowing the patterns will help. Learning to read in different positions will help.

knowing the note names is alot more meaningful when you connect them to either reading and studying theory.
#13
I've "learned" the neck, I recognize the note at any given fret, and know about triads and chord formation (not as familiar with extended and altered chords) so I basically found some patterns from the book I learned theory from and figured others out on my own. It just really helps to know the notes on every string+fret.
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#14
I just see it as octaves and the steps involved, not so theoretical for me.
#17
In practice I tend to see boxes and patterns, however I still needed to learn what those boxes represented, what the notes were, what they sounded like, and how they interacted with each other.

I never really learned boxes, I tried early on and gave up because they were nigh on useless without the necessary theory knowledge to put them in context. When I went back to things a few years later and made myself start learning notes, scales and intervals properly then the patterns were just "there" on the fretboard, they pretty much formed themselves. That's why I always say memorising the patterns alone is pointless, because if you do the theory bit properly there's not really anything to memorise.
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#18
Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
Do you think of it as notes (A, A#, B, etc.) or do you think of it as patterns? I had another thread about learning arpeggios and I got a lot of people telling me to learn the notes, not the patterns, and translate it to guitar. This seems like it would be impossible to think that fast when playing licks during a solo when you're brain is already going 1,000 times a second. Is this something that you can just learn to do by memorizing the fretboard? Discuss

EDIT: and if you are wondering why I started a new thread on this, it is because this seemed like a really good topic to talk about.
One of the best things about guitar is that we can think in degrees and intervals and shapes (from a root note ofcourse) on the fret board. We dont need to think first in notes, than intervals. We can skip straight to thinking in intervals (which is how we're meant to think in music). We can gain alot of speed from skipping that step.

If someone told you to learn the fretboard so you have to think in notes than intervals, they've obviously came to guitar from another instrument.
#20
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I "see" sounds.


same. if you learn notes and patterns then you know how the patterns change around the fretboard (they don't really change, but if you're moving across the b string it appears that they do), so i think its good to do the same.

once i knew the patterns and did some interval/ear training i began to "see" the sound i was going to play before i played it. i'm still not excellent at doing it at lightning speeds, but i guess that's why practice is important.
#21
Quote by sisuphi
i'm still not excellent at doing it at lightning speeds, but i guess that's why practice is important.
You don't have to hear each note, but if you think "I'll play this quick little flurry of notes and it will sound like this," that is fine.