#1
ok, so I'm trying again to learn theory (long story as to why I'm restarting), and I'm using the theory guide on this site, but there is one thing that I just don't under stand..

ok, so I'm working at chord construction, and I'm trying to make an E chord, I couldn't figure it out, so I looked in this book I've got and it says this:

--------- E
--------- B
-1------- G#
---2----- E
---2----- B
--------- E


I just don't understand.. I'm going by the 1, 3, 5 thing, and I can't see how they get the first B or the first and last E.. Shouldn't it be E, G#, B? Why does it start out as E, B, and end with E?

It does a similar thing with A and D chords in my book, and I just don't understand..

Like for A it's

--------- E
--3------ A
--2------ E
--1------ A
--------- A
--------- E

Shouldn't it be A, C, E? Why A, E, A?
Last edited by Dog-- at Apr 15, 2008,
#2
yes it should be E, G# and B and the chord ur playing has those notes. There are more notes to make the chord sound full.
#3
the order of the tones doesnt matter. Chords usually start with the first tone or in this case E, but other than that the order is not important. It just has to contain E G# and B, not in any particular order.
Gibson SG Standard
Ibanez S2170FB
Peavey JSX
Marshall 1960A
TEXAS A&M
#4
It doesn't really matter what order the notes are in is long as it starts on the root note. Chord inversions (making the root note one of the other notes in the chord) is when it needs to be in the exact order.
Quote by Vornik
Thanks for the advice. I'm going to put it, along with your other advice, into a book, the pages of which I will then use to wipe my ass.
#5
Chords are meant to be a harmony. There is no need for order, although the bass note should be clarified. You'll learn about slash chords further down the road.
#6
Oh.. The theory guide I read (on this site) doesn't state that they don't have to be in order..
So I could play E

------ F
------ B
4----- B
6----- G#
------ A
------ E

If I wanted, and it'd be a correctly made E chord? As long as the first note that gets picked is an E?
#7
As for the A chord....
0 E
3 D
2 A
1 D#
0 A
0 E

You didnt got the notes off first all, secondly, the chord is
0 E
2 C#
2 A
2 E
0 A
X

While you could add in the lowest E, this would be an A/E Chord (an A chord with an E as a bass note), which is an inversion of an A chord (Same chord tones but starting on a different tone other that the leading one ie starting with E instead of A).
Gibson SG Standard
Ibanez S2170FB
Peavey JSX
Marshall 1960A
TEXAS A&M
#8
Quote by Dog--
Oh.. The theory guide I read (on this site) doesn't state that they don't have to be in order..
So I could play E

------ F
------ B
4----- B
6----- G#
------ A
------ E

If I wanted, and it'd be a correctly made E chord? As long as the first note that gets picked is an E?


If by "first note that gets picked" you mean the bass note, then yes.

Also when the guy above refers to "slash chords", hes alking about the !?E type chord I was talkin about earlier, you can learn more about this entire chord formation concept at
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/chords/guide_to_chord_formation.html
Gibson SG Standard
Ibanez S2170FB
Peavey JSX
Marshall 1960A
TEXAS A&M
#9
Well the posts are correct and what not, but just for clarification's sake; While the order of the notes does not necessarily matter on the guitar, keep in mind that all music does not revolve around the guitar. For other instruments, the order of notes may matter, such as the piano, E G# B is the closed I chord, but if you switch the order around, say to G# B E, that is a I6 (first inversion) chord. I'm not trying to confuse you, just saying, keep in mind what other instruments might be doing if they accompany your playing.