#1
Fairly simple questions

1. What is gain?
2. How does system of a down make that palm muting sound? How much are the palm muting.
3. In drop D, are the strings that arent tuned down affected in sound?(Probobly stupid but o well)
4. Why does everyone hate Nirvana?lol
#2
1. Distortion
2. They are in drop C most of the time, then just palm mute. Assuming that's the question, not sure if you're asking HOW to palm mute or how they get their palm mute sound.
3. Drop D is just E to D, it only effects the 6th string.
4. Different tastes in music
Last edited by Ze_Metal at Jun 4, 2008,
#4
1. Gain is where you put more sound into your amp than it can actually take, causing a "metal" sound. (This is not bad for your amp)
2. System of a Down palm mutes by, well, palm muting. Daron lays his strumming hand over the strings slightly and strums, causing the sound. Edit: It's not the drop C tuning that changes the sound, it only changes the pitch, which is a totally different matter.
3. No. The only string that is tuned differently is the low E string, and the string's tuning affects the string, not other strings. Maybe slightly in sound, but I wouldn't be able to hear it.
4. I don't know. I do, though. Don't like their music.
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser Deluxe
Boss DS-1
Crate GTD65

GAS List:
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster
#5
Quote by nin3donian
Fairly simple questions

1. What is gain?
2. How does system of a down make that palm muting sound? How much are the palm muting.
3. In drop D, are the strings that arent tuned down affected in sound?(Probobly stupid but o well)
4. Why does everyone hate Nirvana?lol


1. Gain is how much your amplifier 'amplifies' your guitar signal. 'Metal' distortion only occurs when you have a lot of gain, where the tube starts to distort the signal by adding more and more harmonics to the signal. Even a clean signal has some distortion in it, but our ear can't hear it
2. Tuning down helps getting a chugga-chugga tone, but good palm muting technique goes a long way.
3. No
4. I don't :p
Jackson KV 2, Jackson COW 7 (both in B), Jackson Demmelition V
Bogner Überschall (blue rev)
Marshall 1960B Vintage (2x V30 & 2x G12T75)
TC Electronic G Major
BBE Sonic Maximizer 422A
Weber Mass 150w
ISP ProRackG
T.Racks Dinopower
Last edited by Ventor at Apr 16, 2008,
#6
Quote by Ventor
1. Gain is how much your amplifier 'amplifies' your guitar signal. 'Metal' distortion only occurs when you have a lot of gain, where the tube starts to distort the signal by adding more and more harmonics to the signal. Even a clean signal has some distortion in it, but our ear can't hear it


A tube is not necessary, mate. asfastasdark got it bang on.
Quite.
#7
Quote by mister_crowley
A tube is not necessary, mate. asfastasdark got it bang on.


Of course not, but solid states only emulate what a tube does.
And asfastasdark is not bang on.
Jackson KV 2, Jackson COW 7 (both in B), Jackson Demmelition V
Bogner Überschall (blue rev)
Marshall 1960B Vintage (2x V30 & 2x G12T75)
TC Electronic G Major
BBE Sonic Maximizer 422A
Weber Mass 150w
ISP ProRackG
T.Racks Dinopower
#8
Yes I did! I did get it bang on! Lol. I do know that that goes for overdrive (amplifying past the amps limits), but gain is basically the same concept, so I guess that applies to it too. It would surprise me if it didn't.
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser Deluxe
Boss DS-1
Crate GTD65

GAS List:
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster
#9
Quote by asfastasdark
Yes I did! I did get it bang on! Lol. I do know that that goes for overdrive (amplifying past the amps limits), but gain is basically the same concept, so I guess that applies to it too. It would surprise me if it didn't.


Ok first of all, for tube amps, overdrive = distortion. The tubes amplify the guitar signal, thereby creating more and more harmonics when you increase the gain.
At low gain, the sound will sound clean even though it has some distortion in it, we just can't hear it. Increase the gain and it will distort more.
Gain & distortion are linked, increase the gain, you increase the distortion.
An amp can't amplify past it's limits (ie output power), that's why they are limits. I don't know who told you this, but that's complete BS, no offence
Jackson KV 2, Jackson COW 7 (both in B), Jackson Demmelition V
Bogner Überschall (blue rev)
Marshall 1960B Vintage (2x V30 & 2x G12T75)
TC Electronic G Major
BBE Sonic Maximizer 422A
Weber Mass 150w
ISP ProRackG
T.Racks Dinopower
#10
Well it's not technically past the amp's limits, more like pushing a ton of sound through a small amp.
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser Deluxe
Boss DS-1
Crate GTD65

GAS List:
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster
#11
Just curious since I never totally understood gain:

I have a roland microcube that has like 8 different "amp settings" going from acoustic-clean to "r-flier" (high distortion). I was told I should just leave the gain at 0 and let these amp settings do the distorting - is that a good rule of thumb? Or should I crank the gain whenever I'm using higher dist settings?

I can fiddle with it and figure it out, but it's no doubt easier if I actually have an idea of how I "should" set it up!
My Gear
Epi Les Paul
Roland Microcube
Boss DS-1 pedal
Shure SM57
M-Audio Fasttrack
#12
Quote by Aitrus
Just curious since I never totally understood gain:

I have a roland microcube that has like 8 different "amp settings" going from acoustic-clean to "r-flier" (high distortion). I was told I should just leave the gain at 0 and let these amp settings do the distorting - is that a good rule of thumb? Or should I crank the gain whenever I'm using higher dist settings?

I can fiddle with it and figure it out, but it's no doubt easier if I actually have an idea of how I "should" set it up!


Gain should be up almost all the way if you plan on using the R-fier. It will sound better.