#1
I'm gonna buy Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar from Amazon, and I've toyed around with the idea of buying another book. What is either:
-A book every guitarist should own
-Or a book on improvising, incorperating theory into it, and lead in general.
My goals are Slash/Van Halen type rock improv, and improv using arpeggiation, the modes, ect. I'm also interested in training my ear, but that would only be a bonus, I don't want something on only that. So whats the book I'm looking for? Thanks to everybody who responds.

P.S.-If I get it, it'll have to be less than $15, preferably around $12, from Amazon. So no $20 books.
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#2
If you want to use modes, you'll need to know how they're actually used, so search for posts by Archeo Avis and me.

Regarding solos, click the "Learn to Solo" link in my signature.
#3
A book every guitarist should own

Principles of Correct Practice for Guitar by Jamie Andreas. I'm thinking of buying it, but it's probably more than $20.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

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Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#4
I am personally learning from the one in my signature, called Ultra Guitar Method...it's pretty killer from what I can tell (I'm only starting Vol 2 myself, but I know the author. Hell, I built his website!).

It's worth checking out. Volume 1 has already improved my playing pretty dramatically, and I'd been playing for 10 years when I started the method.

Just my $0.02
#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
If you want to use modes, you'll need to know how they're actually used, so search for posts by Archeo Avis and me.

Regarding solos, click the "Learn to Solo" link in my signature.
What about me? and the rest of MT's regulars?

MT is the place to learn to improvise, and its free, unless you want to pay me money?
#10
What about me? and the rest of MT's regulars?
We don't know what we're talking about
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#11
Quote by Ænimus Prime
We don't know what we're talking about
Seconded

I would recommend Petrucci's Rock Discipline. If anything, his ideas are great finger excercises and I always seem to use them. The DVD thing is beyond your price-range, I don't own the DVD myself because you can find it on YouTube or by other internet methods.

Oh yeah and Edg(a regular on this forum) had a great book(s) on lead but I forgot what it was called!! But idk if it was available through Amazon.
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#12
Quote by mydogpoops
I'm gonna buy Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar from Amazon, and I've toyed around with the idea of buying another book. What is either:
-A book every guitarist should own
-Or a book on improvising, incorperating theory into it, and lead in general.
My goals are Slash/Van Halen type rock improv, and improv using arpeggiation, the modes, ect. I'm also interested in training my ear, but that would only be a bonus, I don't want something on only that. So whats the book I'm looking for? Thanks to everybody who responds.

P.S.-If I get it, it'll have to be less than $15, preferably around $12, from Amazon. So no $20 books.


Arguably training your ear is far more important than learning modes - you don't really have to learn modes at all, but you definitely need to learn how to recognise intervals by sound, being able to recognise different scales and chords is also extremely useful, and if you can pick out specific notes you're set for life.
Actually called Mark!

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#13
Quote by steven seagull
Arguably training your ear is far more important than learning modes - you don't really have to learn modes at all, but you definitely need to learn how to recognise intervals by sound, being able to recognise different scales and chords is also extremely useful, and if you can pick out specific notes you're set for life.
+1
Modes are just helpfull and are only needed if you write music (improv, composing etc). Having a musical ear is essential.