#1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWH-VOwHPNk

it seems that changing one note in the major or minor scale is just a little easy for figuring out the modes. is this right or should i just ignore this lesson?
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#3
holy **** that was the easiest lesson i ever learned and i just learned the fingering for the modes (cept locrian), now to learn the notes.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#10
Locrian is a joke mode, before 1900's, noone thought there was a practical use for it.
But anyway, finger it like a lydian mode of one step down except sharpen all the roots. So to finger a B locrian mode, finger a Bb lydian and sharpen all the Bbs, but keep the rest of the fingerings.

When going around in fifths/fourths, modes only change one interval in their scale formula. Locrians root is the interval that changes to get lydian, if that makes sense.

Quote by aradine
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWH-VOwHPNk

it seems that changing one note in the major or minor scale is just a little easy for figuring out the modes. is this right or should i just ignore this lesson?
I only watched the first minute cause i wanna go to bed soon (its twelve here on a school night ), but you should think of modes as notes added to the minor and major pentatonic scales, not as variations off the diatonic major and minor scales. Thats IMO.

When writing forumulas its always as a variation of the diatonic major scale, but in practise, imagine your playing a pentatonic and that your adding special notes to make it modal. Say minor pentatonic add a minor second and minor sixth for phrygian.

Its also very usefull for a guitarist (intermediate guitarists at least) to start thinking in degrees and intervals instead of frets and box shapes. Its the interval that responds harmonically and melodically to another note that gives you that unique sound, and your phrasing of course.
#11
Locrian is a joke mode, before 1900's, noone thought there was a practical use for it.
Um, it's 2008. There obviously is a use for locrian.

but you should think of modes as notes added to the minor and major pentatonic scales, not as variations off the diatonic major and minor scales. Thats IMO.
In my oppinion you should think of modes as a scale by themselves. Not a variation of the major scale or notes added to a pentatonic scale, but just Dorian or Mixolydian etc.
My name is Andy
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Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#12
Quote by Ænimus Prime
In my oppinion you should think of modes as a scale by themselves. Not a variation of the major scale or notes added to a pentatonic scale, .


this is how i think of modes.