#1
got a few quessies.

Okay this has been confusing me for a while now. correct me if im wrong this is what i understand to be

Voicing : the arrangement of the notes in a given chord. When i read through a guitar booklet that had basic theory in it, it specified there was 4 different voices,each voicing comes with a different purpose, eg different sound, strumming, fingerpicking. I am trying to understand how to recognise these. If i saw the notes on the treble, i want to be able to recognise which inversion it is. Are there set inversions? like is there 4 main inversions?

inverted chords, right, now there are millions of ways to play chords right, lets take E major for example, i could play it in plenty of spots, what im asking is, is there set inversions for it, like same to do with voicing, i read some theory stuff and it talked about what i said earlier, what each voicing is good for something, so i guess what im asking is, are their set inversions of this chord? What are ways of recognising it?


Kinda asked the same question twice but hopefully i gave you a better idea of what i am asking.

Thanks alot, if you need more info, just ask.
#2
inverted chords tell you what the bass(or lowest note.. idk if there a difference) note is
for example:
First Inversion 3 1 5
Second 5 1 3
***i'm not 100 percent sure but i dont think the order notes after the lowest matter

and voicing are the whole order
5 1 3
5 3 1
.. different voicings
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Last edited by victoryaloy at Apr 17, 2008,
#3
Inversions refer to the note in the bass of the chord. If the root is in the bass it's called root position, if the 3rd is in the bass it's the first inversion and if the 5th is in the bass it is called the second inversion. Of course, other notes can also be in the bass. 7th chords also feature a third inversion where the 7th is in the bass. I'm not sure on the specifics of inversions for other chords.

As for recognising inversions on a staff, that's fairly simple, it's all about the spacings of the notes. For triads in root position all the notes are touching, with one space or line between each note. For 1st inversion there will be an extra space/line between the lower 2 notes and the upper 1 and 2nd inversion the lowest note will have an extra space/line between that and the upper two. http://www.musictheory.net/ has a good lesson on inversions that helped me to understand how they look when written on staves.

As for different voicings, there are tons of ways to play each chord, and each different voicing does not have a name. Most of what you said is correct except about there being only 4 voices. There can be as many voices as you wish (only 6 on guitar) but in jazz I believe most chords are played as four note voicings.
#4
Quote by Eirien
Inversions refer to the note in the bass of the chord. If the root is in the bass it's called root position, if the 3rd is in the bass it's the first inversion and if the 5th is in the bass it is called the second inversion. Of course, other notes can also be in the bass. 7th chords also feature a third inversion where the 7th is in the bass. I'm not sure on the specifics of inversions for other chords.

As for recognising inversions on a staff, that's fairly simple, it's all about the spacings of the notes. For triads in root position all the notes are touching, with one space or line between each note. For 1st inversion there will be an extra space/line between the lower 2 notes and the upper 1 and 2nd inversion the lowest note will have an extra space/line between that and the upper two. http://www.musictheory.net/ has a good lesson on inversions that helped me to understand how they look when written on staves.

As for different voicings, there are tons of ways to play each chord, and each different voicing does not have a name. Most of what you said is correct except about there being only 4 voices. There can be as many voices as you wish (only 6 on guitar) but in jazz I believe most chords are played as four note voicings.


Ah okay, well basically im right then, except recognising the inversions, still dont understand that. Need to know the rule, and which note, so basically the inversions ( lets stick with triads for now) is all about where the bass note is? should i worry about the order of the other ntoes or just the bass for now.
#5
Okay thanks alot for that link man, and that site is wonderful. Just a question, there are 4 inversions right, that bit there is only dealing with triads, and two inversions. how am i to recognise the others?

Thanks alot
#6
Quote by Czizzle
Ah okay, well basically im right then, except recognising the inversions, still dont understand that. Need to know the rule, and which note, so basically the inversions ( lets stick with triads for now) is all about where the bass note is? should i worry about the order of the other ntoes or just the bass for now.


Yes inversions only refers to which note is in the bass. The order of the other notes doesn't affect which inversion it is. How you order them is all really down to personal preference, but I think it's the upper and lower notes in the voicing that have the biggest impact on how the chord sounds. You should look into voice leading if you haven't done so yet. I think it will help you understand why different voicings and inversions are used.

Quote by Czizzle
Okay thanks alot for that link man, and that site is wonderful. Just a question, there are 4 inversions right, that bit there is only dealing with triads, and two inversions. how am i to recognise the others?

Thanks alot


No worries man.
I'm not sure about that question, but I'm fairly certain things like that just come down to experience and practice.
#7
Thanks alot, yeah there is a seventh chord inversion on that site anyway which is 3rd inversion.

Thanks alot for the help man
#8
Quote by Czizzle
Okay thanks alot for that link man, and that site is wonderful. Just a question, there are 4 inversions right, that bit there is only dealing with triads, and two inversions. how am i to recognise the others?
Like Eiren said, it's all about the bass note.

Ricci Adam's site rocks. But also try this site: http://www.emusictheory.com/practice.html

Pick the chord practice(whatever staff you like) and when it opens up click settings.

Select "Identify chords on staff"(thought the build chord function is cool too) Pick "any inversions" and select which chord types you would like to practice identifying. Hope it helps

EDIT: but you also asked about voicings. And that can get complicated as far as recognizing the chord goes(cuz you can't figure out an inversion if you can't figure out the chord). Again, like Eirien said, you'll want to look up voice-leading. And if you're wondering about more academic stuff, like classical analysis of chords on sheet music, just ask and I'll probably be able to help out.
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Last edited by KryptNet at Apr 17, 2008,
#9
Thanks alot man! thats good to know, and thanks for the site its useful!