#1
I play acoustic in a church band, and due to nobody wanting to hurt anybody else's feelings, there are some sound issues that our bass player got sick of, and he is quitting until these things are resolved. So, since it sounds worse with no bass than no acoustic, I guess I get to pull bass duty for awhile.

Problem is, this other guy plays his bass as if it's a lead guitar, inserting all kinds of random runs and fills. Some of it is cool, some of it is overkill. I'm going to seem like a second rate chump if I can't do any of it though.

So, what theory/scale/lesson/whatever should I practice/study/whatever to be able to do this stuff? I'm not very creative, I'd just like to copy/mimick a handful of these things to spice up a song a little.
#3
Quote by Deliriumbassist
I don't think the congregation are going to care if you're better than the previous bassist or not. If they do care, they're at church for the wrong reason.


Damn you Delirium!!! Everytime I come up with a good insightful answer I scroll down only to find that you have already posted the exact answer but stated it way better and I am left with a +1 so.......

damnit

+1

Edit: I guess thats why you are Dr. Phil
Out here you've gotta know where your towel is!
Last edited by ValoRhoads at Apr 17, 2008,
#4
Quote by Deliriumbassist
I don't think the congregation are going to care if you're better than the previous bassist or not. If they do care, they're at church for the wrong reason.


You're right, but at the same time, think about if the Chili Peppers called you up and said you need to stand in for Flea for a couple months. Even if nobody cared, you'd still know that you're nowhere close to the same level. That's what I'm feeling like right now. I think if presented with that situation, you would want to at least learn a few of his slapping riffs, would you not? That's all I'm wanting.
#6
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Thing is, do you play bass as it is?


Not regularly... I did play for 4 years in pep band and at my previous church, and I've played off and on for 15 years, so I'm not a total bass newbie. If I were just going to suddenly realize on my own how to play lots of runs and fills I think I would have figured it out by now. I have no idea where to start though. Figured now is as good of a time as any to break down and do it. It's not like I'm never going to pick up a bass again after this other dude starts back up, so maybe I shouldn't have even mentioned the reason I'm wanting to learn. I want to learn anyway, it's just that now I have a good excuse.
#7
Well, personally, I tend to do fills starting with a note found in the chord, or a note that adds to the chord (say the guitarist plays a C5, I may play an E, making the overall chord a C, or a D# making it Cm), and then just fiddle around from there with other notes within the scale.
#8
Quote by Deliriumbassist
then just fiddle around from there with other notes within the scale.


Does bass in this type of music always stick with the major scale? Does penatonic and all that kind of stuff ever come into play?
#10
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Just look through your songs and work them out.


What if you're playing by ear, on the fly, where they piano guy says "ok play this, key of G, right now, ready GO"? I'd assume that's all major scale stuff?
#11
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Well, personally, I tend to do fills starting with a note found in the chord, or a note that adds to the chord (say the guitarist plays a C5, I may play an E, making the overall chord a C, or a D# making it Cm), and then just fiddle around from there with other notes within the scale.

Eb. :
For long you live and high you fly
But only if you ride the tide
And balanced on the biggest wave
You race toward an early grave.


Ben Hamelech