#1
Just curious about how many scales people can recite on the spot. I only know the major scale at the minute so obviously thats the only one I can fully recite, but I can just see myself getting confused when I learn more scales and have to remember them all.
#2
Well there's only slight differences between them. Once you understand how scales work you'll realise this question is redundant. For example to make the major scale minor you flatten the 3rd and 7th.
#3
the 6th is also flat in a minor scale, it is the Dorian that only has a flat 3rd and 7th. But yes, all modes revolve around the Major scale, it just depends on what the root is. C Major = D Dorian = A Aeolian (Minor) and so on.
#4
Learn the pentatonic, it's insanely useful if you play guitar.

Also, diminished and augmented scales (though they're not really scales) are brilliant.
#6
i know 2 i can play on the spot they are simple
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#7
Learning tons of scales is to me rather geeky, and not really useful at all until you are already a very accomplished guitarist and you want just a slightly bigger vocabulary. A lot of people play scales simply as patterns and then they feel they're repeating themselves and want to learn more scales. But if you know how to utilize the major scale and recognize all it's possibilities, you will barely ever need any other scales (note that the natural minor scale and all the modes are found within the major scale aswell, so I don't see the need in thinking of them as separate scales to learn).
#8
Learn the intervals that make up the scales rather than learning the notes in each individual scale, then all you need to do is apply the formula and off you go on the track mate off you go like a zertec.

I myself haven't bothered learning the patterns for the modes but ill get round to it. Learn your intervals then your sweet.

My tip to learn them would be to, write all the modes down then the pattern each one follows, then try and remember that with a simple WHWWHWW kind of thing. Test yourself each day and see if you can remember 7. It can get kinda annoying but if you just recite them over in your head as if your learning lines youll be fine!
#9
Quote by Aziraphale
Learning tons of scales is to me rather geeky, and not really useful at all until you are already a very accomplished guitarist and you want just a slightly bigger vocabulary. A lot of people play scales simply as patterns and then they feel they're repeating themselves and want to learn more scales. But if you know how to utilize the major scale and recognize all it's possibilities, you will barely ever need any other scales (note that the natural minor scale and all the modes are found within the major scale aswell, so I don't see the need in thinking of them as separate scales to learn).


Definitely agree with most of that, however i reckon it is still very relevant to learn the intervals and patterns of the other scales. I agree though, definitely work with the major scale first and be able to turn it into music rather than mindless runs up and down the fretboard like heaps of ppl tend to do.
#10
Quote by Czizzle
Definitely agree with most of that, however i reckon it is still very relevant to learn the intervals and patterns of the other scales. I agree though, definitely work with the major scale first and be able to turn it into music rather than mindless runs up and down the fretboard like heaps of ppl tend to do.


Yeah, by the major scale I wasn't at all referring to patterns rather than intervals. I fully agree, I think it's kind of odd that so many guitarists have no clue what notes or intervals they're playing, they just follow boxes. I think the guitar is the only instrument you can really get away with that on... and tbh, I think you'd save yourself a lot of studying if you just sat down and learned the notes and intervals/circle of fifths once and for all instead of learning all these separate scales and fingerings in different keys, and never seeing the connections or even knowing what you're playing. Theory isn't at all that hard, and you're constantly being rewarded while studying it because of all the pieces falling in place.
#11
Quote by YourVillain
Also, diminished and augmented scales (though they're not really scales) are brilliant.


They're absolutely scales. Half-whole, Whole-half and whole tone.
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#12
Major..

natural Minor
harmonic minor

Blues

Major Pent

Minor Pent


... and because i know all the two-octave major scale positions i therefore know all the modes...

*if only i could remeber their order....

something about "I Dont Play Lacrosse Much After Lunch"
ionian, dorian, phrygian, lydian, mixolydian, aeolian, locrian....? did i get it?
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#13
I know boxes of Minor Pentatonic, Blues, Major, Natural Minor, Harmonic Minor, Melodic Minor, Whole Tone and Whole-Half scales.

As for modes I know Ionian(DUR), Mixolydian, Lydian and Phrygian Dominant.

But for anybody reading this, you're much better off sticking to learning the Major scale inside out.
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#14
Quote by J.A.M
I know boxes of ..... Natural Minor,

As for modes I know Ionian(DUR), Mixolydian, Lydian and Phrygian Dominant..



you forgot Aeolian (Duh)
Quote by King Twili
It's just me and Doris here ;_;



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#15
Quote by david_safc
Just curious about how many scales people can recite on the spot. I only know the major scale at the minute so obviously thats the only one I can fully recite, but I can just see myself getting confused when I learn more scales and have to remember them all.

Know them all on the fretboard. Reciting them is a different matter. Although knowing the shapes and the sounds has been far more useful.
#16
Quote by JoshCrawford
Know them all on the fretboard. Reciting them is a different matter.



yeah all the scales/modes that i know i couldnt tell you their formulae or their designated notes..


but ill draw you a sh|t load of pretty looking boxes
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#17
So are we talking the intervals, patterns, all the notes on the fretboard for each different key? Do we count F Major and D Major as different scales since they have different notes, or one because its the same interval?

Its hard to say how many one knows unless the standard is set.
#18
Quote by Early Cuyler
you forgot Aeolian (Duh)

facepalm.jpg
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#19
i know the construction of the scales and generally go by feel as to wheres what on the fretboard.

i generally know all the modes and some of the more popular 'odd' ones (like phrygian dominant, diminished, etc)

but knowing a scale is completely different than fully knowing how to USE a scale properly.
#20
Major, Minor, Harmonic Minor, Minor Pentatonic, Whole Tone, and of course Chromatic.
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#21
Quote by Aziraphale
Yeah, by the major scale I wasn't at all referring to patterns rather than intervals. I fully agree, I think it's kind of odd that so many guitarists have no clue what notes or intervals they're playing, they just follow boxes. I think the guitar is the only instrument you can really get away with that on... and tbh, I think you'd save yourself a lot of studying if you just sat down and learned the notes and intervals/circle of fifths once and for all instead of learning all these separate scales and fingerings in different keys, and never seeing the connections or even knowing what you're playing. Theory isn't at all that hard, and you're constantly being rewarded while studying it because of all the pieces falling in place.


The man speaks truth, oh yes he does.
#22
Major, Minor (I actually have limited use of modes other then Dorian, Phrygian and MixoLydian...but have all the formulas memorized, idk why). Pent, Aug, Dim. Those are the ones I have in my head. The rest, as many said, can be derived from these IMO. EDIT: derived from the major scale.

But I do have interest in certain exotic scales but usually look them up when I want to play within their tonalities which again, when you've got your standard scales down, is easy to to "convert" to.
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#23
All the diatonic useful ones that are harmonically stable. Don't really bother with the rest, except for chromatic and altered.
#24
Hm.. well the ones that I actually use are..

Minor Pentatonic/Minor Pentatonic Blues/Minor Pentatonic add9/Minor + Major Pentatonic (or Minor and Mixolydian sometimes)
Major Pentatonic
All of the modes of the Major scale
Harmonic Minor and its modes (I rarely use its modes, except for Phrygian dominant)
Diminished.. I don't use the actual full diminished scale, but "symmetrical diminished" or I think I've heard it be called Diminished Pentatonic by someone

I barely ever think scalar though, mostly its arpeggios and making melody and trying to create tension and release.
#27
Quote by jakethesnakeLP
Theory may have ruined rock n' roll's simplistic wonder.

...and this is the dumbest comment I've seen in quite a while.
#28
Every one (inc. Byzantine, and the false names like "Egyptian").

I can play them in any position, etc.

Though this comes naturally once you learn:
a) What modes & scales really are.
b) Notes on the fretboard.

I learnt the major scale, then knew that "Harmonic Minor" is a lowered third and sixth.
So in C major I get a Eb and an Ab.

It all comes with time, and perseverance man.
Good luck.
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#29
Quote by jakethesnakeLP
None, baby! An' still rockin.....
Theory may have ruined rock n' roll's simplistic wonder.


I lol'd.
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#30
Quote by jakethesnakeLP
None, baby! An' still rockin.....
Theory may have ruined rock n' roll's simplistic wonder.


I'd say the past rock n' rollers, blues cats and all those (from Jimi and Clapton to Joe Perry or Stevie Ray) knew/know ****loads of theory, they just don't know what to call it. A lot of these songs switch keys seamlessly and circle different tonalities in ways most new bands don't have a clue how to do, jumping between major and minor and using tons of altered chords.

Theory is in essence not just a bunch of terms, it's about knowing what you want to hear and then play that, as opposed to just fiddling around and hoping it sounds good. These guys know exactly what they're doing, even if they don't know what a phrygian dominant scale is they knew perfectly well how to use it and when to use it.

So a lot of old-time rock n' roll, blues and RnB is a whole lot more theoretically advanced than what most guitar oriented bands put out today.