#1
My band is getting the master of our demo back tomorrow, and we want to send it out again with the cover/disc art to get duplicated tomorrow too. So I need to put the final details of copyright stuff on the art before we send it out.

My question is, in the UK, what copyright info needs to be shown on the back cover and the disc?

let's use letters to define the people involved


band: X
mixer/producer: Y
mastering: Z

recorded in 2007, mixed in 2007, mastered in 2008
cover art was done by myself


any help would be much appreciated, we're short on time and can't put *everything* on there in great detail as there's no insert.


thanks =]
#2
Right. Remember, stuff you do now *is* binding legally, don't treat it as something unimportant.

I'm not an expert in music law, but I don't think that you have to put a copyright mark on at all-copyrights come from creating something new, not from marking your territory. Worth doing, though, just to establish in people's minds that it's new and yours.

I'd say what you've got above will do nicely at the the bottom of the back cover-something like
"All songs written by TUV, Performed by X, Recorded at Y, Mastered by Z" Adding the dates might not be a bad idea as well. Stick the little 'all rights reserved' note on there underneath that as well, and you should be fine.

For demos, this isn't stuff to panic about now, as I assume you won't ever be trying to sell the versions you have recorded currently. More important is agreeing songwriting credits and the like, because those stay the same should you come to re-record it. A little agreement now could potentially save you a ****load of trouble later.
#3
cheers =]

the irony of all this is that my brother's a lawyer, but his phone is knackered at the moment... =P

we've already had a load of wasted time writing up agreements for our old guitarist to sign off his rights to his guitar parts on said demo (he was happy to do so), it's all fun and games isn't it... =P
#4
Quote by EatsP1es
cheers =]
we've already had a load of wasted time writing up agreements for our old guitarist to sign off his rights to his guitar parts on said demo


Yeah, that would be a waste of time. Guitar parts aren't generally considered as any part of the actual *song* as it applies to copyright. (song = lyrics and melody) Who cares, from a legal standpoint, about somebody's guitar parts?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.