#1
at Gibsons site, it says the Studio is "a guitar for the studio musician"

think they mean youll get the same LP sound as the more $$$ LP's but without the fancy finishes and higher prices

or what?

thanks
08 Wine Red Gibson Les Paul Studio
#2
Its a lower quality guitar. Plus quality control control is less stringent (Not that its great on the Standards anyway). You wont get the same sound out of the two.
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#4
Quote by CorvetteRick
Pretty much, also I believe the studio does not have a carved top, it is just a flat slab of wood in the shape of an LP.
It's not a flattop. It doesn't exactly have a fully figured AAA or AAAA maple cap though...

Basically, a Studio (and also the Vintage Mahogany, and Faded, and in the case of the SGs, the Special) all stick to the following cut-backs:
- Cheaper hardware. It both comes from a worse quality cast, and the metal components are made with a crappier alloy. This goes the bridges, tuners, inputs, mounting rings, pickguards, and so on. These cost cuts will effect your tone, sustain, and tuning stability, not to mention just overall quality and life expectancy of the instrument.
- Cheaper finish. The quality of the nitro lacquer used isn't as good and less care is taken over it's application. 'Faded' models are also artificially worn-down too on top of this. These cheaper models are thus more prone to bumps, scratches, dents and wear. Tonally they will give a slightly muddier tone thanks to the cheaper lacquer (note: not to be confused with the darker tone that poly plastic finishes give).
- No binding, cheaper inlays, and so on. This speaks for itself.
- Lower grade wood in the bodys, neck and fretboard. Again, this speaks for itself.
- Body construction. Specials, Studios, VMs and Fadeds are made from 2-piece or 3-piece slab construction (depends on the specific model and year it was made), rather than one solid slab. This mostly 'just' affects sustain more than anything else.
- Pickups. Aside from a few Limited Edition models, these cut-back guitars only come with Gibson's most basic (and crappiest) pickups.
- Wiring, pots, etc. It's cheaper and less care is taken over it, go figure.


Basically, these models have a muddier, 'simpler' tone, less sustain, won't last as long, and basically all-around aren't up to snuff. You're paying half the price, so you're getting half the quality. It's that simple really.


That said, I've got a couple of Studios, a Faded and an SG Special hanging around myself. They're good guitars for home mod jobs, and they look pretty but won't burn a huge hole in your pocket if you smash one up or so on for rock 'n' roll glory.

They're 'fun' guitars to **** about with, just don't expect to really get your money's worth, and the idea that anyone would use one of these for studio recording - let alone a live gig - is a joke.
#5
Quote by bokuho
It's not a flattop. It doesn't exactly have a fully figured AAA or AAAA maple cap though...

Basically, a Studio (and also the Vintage Mahogany, and Faded, and in the case of the SGs, the Special) all stick to the following cut-backs:
- Cheaper hardware. It both comes from a worse quality cast, and the metal components are made with a crappier alloy. This goes the bridges, tuners, inputs, mounting rings, pickguards, and so on. These cost cuts will effect your tone, sustain, and tuning stability, not to mention just overall quality and life expectancy of the instrument.
- Cheaper finish. The quality of the nitro lacquer used isn't as good and less care is taken over it's application. 'Faded' models are also artificially worn-down too on top of this. These cheaper models are thus more prone to bumps, scratches, dents and wear. Tonally they will give a slightly muddier tone thanks to the cheaper lacquer (note: not to be confused with the darker tone that poly plastic finishes give).
- No binding, cheaper inlays, and so on. This speaks for itself.
- Lower grade wood in the bodys, neck and fretboard. Again, this speaks for itself.
- Body construction. Specials, Studios, VMs and Fadeds are made from 2-piece or 3-piece slab construction (depends on the specific model and year it was made), rather than one solid slab. This mostly 'just' affects sustain more than anything else.
- Pickups. Aside from a few Limited Edition models, these cut-back guitars only come with Gibson's most basic (and crappiest) pickups.
- Wiring, pots, etc. It's cheaper and less care is taken over it, go figure.


Basically, these models have a muddier, 'simpler' tone, less sustain, won't last as long, and basically all-around aren't up to snuff. You're paying half the price, so you're getting half the quality. It's that simple really.


That said, I've got a couple of Studios, a Faded and an SG Special hanging around myself. They're good guitars for home mod jobs, and they look pretty but won't burn a huge hole in your pocket if you smash one up or so on for rock 'n' roll glory.

They're 'fun' guitars to **** about with, just don't expect to really get your money's worth, and the idea that anyone would use one of these for studio recording - let alone a live gig - is a joke.


sweet... how does the Gibson SG Standard hold up/stack up, i used to have one and loved it but i obviously know only a fraction compared to your nerdEness

thinking about pickin up another SG.. hopefully by 09

thanks
08 Wine Red Gibson Les Paul Studio
#6
Try an Epiphone Elitist LP. A lot of people on this site say they're just as good as Gibson standards.