#1
i'm a little scared to do some inlay work on my guitar. I want to put in trapezoid inlays in place of the dots I installed (they came out crooked). I followed all of the tips and things I've read but i'm still having trouble. i did some practice ones and it's left a bad taste in my mouth... aside from the saw dust

here's what i did:

placed inlay into position with rubber cement
traced inlay shape into board with exacto knife - made 4 passes on each edge to make sure they were deep enough without the knife walking into the grain
removed inlay and patted around the area with chalk dust to fill the knife marks
plunge rout with 1/8" bit to clear away majority of the material
rout edges with 1/32" bit and get as close to the line as possible

that's when i run into the problem. no matter how close i get with the bit it's still way too small!!! what the heck am i doing wrong? i hate having to go back in with chisels because then the whole cavity gets all caddy-wompis

does anyone have any suggestions or websites i could visit with some more in depth detail? if this were a rosewood or ebony board it wouldnt be so bad because i'd just make the cavity larger and use a lot of epoxy/dust but this is pao ferro and it's a lighter wood so the filler kinda shows a bit which requires the cavities to be close to size
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#2
If the cavity for the inlay is a near as you can get it to the real size and shape of the trapezoid, you could try sanding down the actual inlay to fit.




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#3
hmmm... not a bad idea... yea I get the router very close to the size but it still doesn't seem to want to fit. I then resort to scraping the sides with a chisel and keep wondering if it takes everyone over an hour to do each inlay or am I just a retard - i'm thinking the latter of the two considering the inlay work i've seen on this site. I'm gonna spend time and do a lot of practice pockets before I take the chance at the real thing... i'd rather screw up pieces of scrap wood than ruin my fretboard.
Support your local luthier!

Timpson Guitars and TDM Pickups rock ;D

I make guitars and pickups. I also make sh*t that'll blow you the f*k up as well as things that will rebuild you - I have the technology
#4
Dont think about it as how long it takes to do, think about it as the quality of the finished product. Wouldnt you rather spend an entire day on each inlay if it means it turns out exactly how you want it?




Quote by dogismycopilot
Absent Mind, words cant express how much i love you. Id bone you, oh yea.

Quote by lumberjack
Absent Mind is, as usual, completely correct.

Quote by littlemurph7976
Id like to make my love for Neil public knowledge as he is a beautiful man
#5
you have a point... i'm sure i'll get better at it... i'm just scared to death being it's the first time
Support your local luthier!

Timpson Guitars and TDM Pickups rock ;D

I make guitars and pickups. I also make sh*t that'll blow you the f*k up as well as things that will rebuild you - I have the technology
#6
Theres a special bit used for inlays. Stew mac carries them. And would probably work better with the small detail router or a dremel.
#7
i have stewmac inlay router bits. i have the 1/8" downcut bit and some 1/32" and .055" inlay bits with a dremel with the dremel router base.
Support your local luthier!

Timpson Guitars and TDM Pickups rock ;D

I make guitars and pickups. I also make sh*t that'll blow you the f*k up as well as things that will rebuild you - I have the technology