#1
Here is a tuning for 4-string to mess around with if you have a spare bass. You will probably have to restring.
Low to high: C G D A or tuned in fifths instead of fourths.

I came up with this to get through a jazz class I took years ago. The instructor picked phrases that were really hard to play at the speed he wanted in standard tuning (but no problem for horn players..). This tuning got me through the class. It also gives you the 'dropped a whole step' tuning feel between every two adjacent strings and extends the range of a four string drastically.

Edit) For strings: I use a low B-string gauge for the C, A-string for the G, D-string (duh), and a high C-string for the A. The tension is actually balanced nicely.
Last edited by scawti at Apr 18, 2008,
#2
Cello tuning is awesome

infact my first instrument being Viola it was the first tuning i ever learnt
Gear:
Washburn RB2500 (5 String)
Yamaha BB400 Fretless (1981)
Carlo Giordano 3/4 Upright (White)
Cort Action 4 (Stereo-fied)
Orange Bass Terror 500
Orange 1x15 Cab
Boss GT-6 Bass Multi-effects
#3
I've always wanted to try that actually. Not that tuning specifically, but tuning in fifths. Maybe I'll try it out on my SX at some point.
#4
Have you got any examples of what you played in the tuning at all?
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Help Bunny gain world domination by copying and pasting him in your sig or webpage.

ANDY!!!
#5
Apparently tuning to fifths gives a 4-string bass pretty much the same notes as a 6-string bass.

That'd be interesting, but I think the scale length is too long for that tuning to be comfortable - there's a reason the upright is tuned to 4ths.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#6
Also for the more geometric bass players, the patterns are very difficult to transfer, and will eventually give you a headache when playing in 5ths. I started fiddling around with Cello recently, and I just ended up tuning it in 4ths in drop D. It was much easier for me...

Most "unreachable" 4 string notes can easily be obtained with an understanding of modes. Either the 23 or 24 fret will be in almost any scale on the bass, and are usually almost never touched by the average bass player. However, knowing how to use the very upper range of your bass, even in the uncomfortable top-of-the-mountain position, will extend your solo range and feel drastically. It also helps in chording.

I can see the range benefits of tuning in fourths, but if you still wish to play solid bass lines, just buy an extended range instrument.

Does anyone know a bass player who plays tuned in fifths? (not any drop tunings... all fifths)


Dictator For Life of the fIREHOSE fANCLUB. PM Me, Tedrick, or Yertle to join.
#7
That'd be interesting, but I think the scale length is too long for that tuning to be comfortable - there's a reason the upright is tuned to 4ths.

The bass I used was 34" scale and the tuning was comfortable, similiar feel to tuning down a half-step - much to the surprise of the tech that set it up for me.

Have you got any examples of what you played in the tuning at all?

The only recorded is a dreadful cover of Tool's Sober where the guitarist and I swapped parts... never play Sober not sober.
The tuning worked really well for Jazz, but also any song in C or G major. The bottom two strings are ready to play anything really in Drop-C.
You really have to think to transpose songs from standard. It's not a tuning I'd recomend for a main bass. But guitarists have their weird tunings for certain songs.... why can't we.