#1
Does anyone else have this problem? Playing electric guitar...no prob. Playing acoustic...failure every time. Every acoustic I own or have looked at I can't fret completely. Could I make this easier by switching to thinner acoustic strings? Is acoustic "action" higher than electric?

#2
Acoustic action tends to be higher than electric, this is true. You need to be very firm...playing electric, comparably, is a lot easier, in terms of fretting effort.
#4
Freak...

j/k

That was one trick I was told about, just switching to thinner acoustic strings. On average, action tends to be higher on acoustics, but I think that's also due to the thicker strings (they need more room to vibrate). With a really good setup done on a decent acoustic though, string height can get close to the average electric (my Greg Bennett's just about on par with the highest action on my electrics).

Then like anything else, practice makes perfect.
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Last edited by Hakael at Apr 18, 2008,
#6
just play acoustic a lot for a while
you need to build up finger strength obviously

i dont play my acoustic very much at all, my barre chords still suck ass some of the time :P
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#10
Some of the most beutifull noises to hit your ears will come from an acoustic.
Try playing a lot more arpeggios, barre chords, and some hammer ons / pull offs on an acoustic. It will build finger streangth and will make electrics action seem light and will allow for better laying on both.
Hope this advice helps.
#11
Quote by Chorduroy
All my practice is acoustic but on an unplugged electric. Too frustrating trying to play the acoustic guitar.


I meant, the acoustic guitar...even if its an electric guitar song, learn it on acoustic...if you can play something on acoustic, you can play it on electric...doesn't always work the other way around.

It might be frustrating, but just deal with it, you'll be better in the end.
#12
Quote by hellraiser1133
I meant, the acoustic guitar...even if its an electric guitar song, learn it on acoustic...if you can play something on acoustic, you can play it on electric...doesn't always work the other way around.

It might be frustrating, but just deal with it, you'll be better in the end.


I will try that after switching strings. I thought learning acoustic would be the smart way to go, but having my head burst into flames at the frustration got to be too tough. Thanks for the advice (everyone).
#13
Sometimes it's frustrating for me as well, but it's just another thing to get used to. I know when I'm done playing around on my acoustic, the electric seems to be much easier to fret, almost lighter in a way.

Besides, being able to play on the acoustic really brings the chicks around.


...


I'm not sure where the chicks go since I've never really seen any come by, but they must be going somewhere...
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#14
Aw noway man, acoustic guitar rocks! I was always told to play acoustic first before electric, it's an easier switch...
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#15
this is because (im willing to beat any money) that you first learned guitar with an electric, and said "screw acoustic" cause that happens all the time, cause you need to learn acoustic first, cause it builds strength and then when you switch over to electric you find it so easy and light. But you should just stop with electric for a bit, and switch over to acoustic for a while and practice, thats pretty much the key.
#16
Quote by this&that
this is because (im willing to beat any money) that you first learned guitar with an electric, and said "screw acoustic" cause that happens all the time, cause you need to learn acoustic first, cause it builds strength and then when you switch over to electric you find it so easy and light. But you should just stop with electric for a bit, and switch over to acoustic for a while and practice, thats pretty much the key.


Actually I started with an acoustic and struggled.
#17
Quote by Hakael
Freak...

j/k

That was one trick I was told about, just switching to thinner acoustic strings. On average, action tends to be higher on acoustics, but I think that's also due to the thicker strings (they need more room to vibrate). With a really good setup done on a decent acoustic though, string height can get close to the average electric (my Greg Bennett's just about on par with the highest action on my electrics).

Then like anything else, practice makes perfect.

I'm think the vibrations are actually tighter because of the higher tension. I know I've got really good action on my acoustic, and I'm playing with 13s, mostly in standard. Not shred-worthy action (not that I'd want it that low), but not unbearably high by any means. Bends are tough, but that will just take time.
Keep playing on the heavier strings if you can. It's hard at first, but your playing will benefit immensely because your fingers will be much stronger. Bends will be harder with thicker strings (keep working at it), but I personally find that a guitar sounds better with thicker strings anyway. My electric has 11s on it right now (standard tuning, occaisionally drop d or d standard), might go to 12s when I get a better electric if they work well with the guitar. I might get a prs se of some sort, probably the semi-hollow, and I've heard the wraparound tailpiece works better with an unwound 3rd string.
I think my speed overall may have also gotten better partly because I almost always play acoustic now (my electric SUCKS) and so I had to develop more economic motions in both hands to maintain my speed. How many people learn songs like master of puppets or ytse jam on acoustic? No lie, I'm working my way through those songs on my acoustic, among others. No hope for the ytse jam solo for a while though... well maybe the tapping bit with lots of practice.
#18
Quote by chimpinatux
just play acoustic a lot for a while
you need to build up finger strength obviously

i dont play my acoustic very much at all, my barre chords still suck ass some of the time :P


+1
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#19
Quote by this&that
this is because (im willing to beat any money) that you first learned guitar with an electric, and said "screw acoustic" cause that happens all the time, cause you need to learn acoustic first, cause it builds strength and then when you switch over to electric you find it so easy and light. But you should just stop with electric for a bit, and switch over to acoustic for a while and practice, thats pretty much the key.

No, you should learn on whichever you like better (which suits your musical tastes), because otherwise you may get tired of it and stop playing. Can you imagine making a heavy metal kid learn on acoustic? If the person's a committed metalhead/rocker/whatever and has no real interest in acoustic, let them learn on electric and maybe get an acoustic later. I moved to acoustic because a) my acoustic is awesome, b) my electric sucks, c) my amp sucks, and d) i like all kinds of music and don't have a problem learning metal songs, jazz numbers, or whatever else on acoustic just because it still sounds good to my ears. If I need distortion or effects I'll get my amp and pedals, but I really don't need it most of the time.
Come to think of it, it probably helps that my acoustic has 21 frets...