#1
Okay, so energy is measured in Joules.

But, how much energy does one Joule equal to?

Is it like "1 joule = about the amount of energy it takes to stand"

what is it?
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#3
A joule is also a Newton metre, which is the energy used to move one newton a distance of 1 metre
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#4
Quote by mikb
A joule is also a Newton metre, which is the energy used to move one newton a distance of 1 metre

Is that sideways?
#5
yeah horizontally I imagine.
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#6
Quote by mikb
yeah horizontally I imagine.


Not really. It could be any direction, as energy is a scalar.

So it could be up, down, left or backwards, as long as you're moving one newton one meter, it's joules.
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#8
Quote by mikb
A joule is also a Newton metre, which is the energy used to move one newton a distance of 1 metre



This answer is usefull


Is this just a general enquiry of do you have homework to do? If so could you say the full question.


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#9
Quote by blair30
This answer is usefull


Is this just a general enquiry of do you have homework to do? If so could you say the full question.


I like science I do


Do you want to do mine instead?

I could post it if you really want...
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#11
Quote by blair30
Yeah okay


Explain why [Ti(H20)6]3+ is pale purple in colour, whilst [Mn(H20)6]3+ is almost colourless.


And...Go!
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#13
Quote by ZanasCross
^Meh to elements and their spectroscopies... photon absorption, blah. I'm assuming that's what you are doing there.


Well yeah, but why does one absorb photons of a different wavelength?

I'll give you a clue, the man got the 1945 Nobel prize for explaining this...
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#14
Quote by darthteet
Explain why [Ti(H20)6]3+ is pale purple in colour, whilst [Mn(H20)6]3+ is almost colourless.


And...Go!



[Ti(H20)6]3+ absorbs the green in white light, therefore white light minus green (purple) is ttransmitted

[Mn(H20)6]3+ musn't absorb any light then


I think


I dont know why this happens Im afraid
#15
Quote by blair30

I dont know why this happens Im afraid



Well then you didn't answer the question, did you? We know what it wavelengths it absorbs in, but why? And why doesn't the other one absorb any light?
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#16
The nuclei of each individual substance is excited by certain energy photons (E=hf; f=c/(lambda)), each color is related to a certain wave-length and ergo frequency. The nuclei can be excited to another stable state if struck by a photon with the correct energy, it takes the energy from the photon and completes the state jump, which causes absorption of hte photon. When the nuclei drops states, it emits another photon of a certain wave length, which is passed back outside. All photons without the given energy pass through without causing any ruckus.
#17
Quote by ZanasCross
The nuclei of each individual substance is excited by certain energy photons (E=hf; f=c/(lambda)), each color is related to a certain wave-length and ergo frequency. The nuclei can be excited to another stable state if struck by a photon with the correct energy, it takes the energy from the photon and completes the state jump, which causes absorption of hte photon. When the nuclei drops states, it emits another photon of a certain wave length, which is passed back outside. All photons without the given energy pass through without causing any ruckus.


Right yeah, stimulated emission, but what difference does the change of anion make?
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#18
Not sure... you're getting beyond me there. I just took a test of stimulated emission and basic scattering patterns today. Whoo basic undergraduate physics. We haven't moved into using actual molecules yet. That's next week, care to explain?
Last edited by ZanasCross at Apr 18, 2008,
#19
Quote by ZanasCross
Not sure... you're getting beyond me there. I just took a test of stimulated emission and basic scattering patterns today. Whoo basic undergraduate physics. We haven't moved into using actual molecules yet. That's next week.



Pauli exclusion principal. Maybe a bit technical, but I can't really put it any other way;

The Ti (3+) is 3d1. So electrons can be promoted from the t2g to eg orbital. Yellow light absorbed in this process, so purple is transmitted.

Mn2+ is 3d5 high spin. All the orbitals have one electron, so an electron can only be promoted to eg if it changes spin. If not, Pauli exclusion principal is violated. Transitions in which there is a change of spin is forbidden, so Mn2+ is colourless.

Just noticed, in my question I called the manganese ligand 3+, when it should be 2+.
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#21
Quote by darthteet
Explain why [Ti(H20)6]3+ is pale purple in colour, whilst [Mn(H20)6]3+ is almost colourless.


And...Go!


[Ti(H20)6]3+ because of d-d interactions absorbing everything but blue and red hence the purple colour.

[Mn(H20)6]3+ is almost colourless because its extinction co efficent is very low. This is due to forbidden d-d interactions occuring, and hence there is a low probability that the transition in the d-d interaction will lead to a coloured compound.

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#22
To answer the original poster, a Joule is about the energy required to lift 1/10 kilogram vertically 1 meter.

Quote by darthteet
Not really. It could be any direction, as energy is a scalar.

So it could be up, down, left or backwards, as long as you're moving one newton one meter, it's joules.


You are not actually moving the newton around, you're appliying a one newton force over the distance of a meter.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Apr 18, 2008,
#23
Quote by GC Shred Off
To answer the original poster, a Joule is about the energy required to lift 1/10 kilogram vertically 1 meter.


You are not actually moving the newton around, you're appliying a one newton force over the distance of a meter.


Moving one newton, I meant as moving any object with a force of one newton for one meter.

The vertical is irrelevant, because by introducing that vector, a joule could change depending on the gravitational field.
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#24
Quote by darthteet
The vertical is irrelevant, because by introducing that vector, a joule could change depending on the gravitational field.


The vertical situation was just an example for the TS to picture how much a joule is.