#1
We think we have some good music, but we don't know how good our lyrics are. We would like to try them out, but we don't want to look retarded. Another thing is how related the lyrics are. We can write really good lines, and put them together in a song, but it doesn't make a whole lot of sense. We're not even sure lyrics will work with our music, our best song doesn't even really have a chorus. It's on our MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/theroulettepage. We just kinda need help...

EDIT: There's an example of the lyrics in post #12.
"There is no hell. There is only France." - Frank Zappa
Last edited by Armagedn at Apr 19, 2008,
#2
A song doesn't need a chorus.


There's nothing wrong with an instrumental, but people usually prefer lyrics. Lyrics don't always have to be deeply profound and Shakespearean; they can be goofy and funny. My theory is that they should just not be stupid enough to detract from the song.
#3
I'm listening to other stuff right now as I surf, but here's my take on a philosophical/practical level.

Depending on the genre, you can get away with either instrumentals or crap lyrics. Instrumentals work best with 'artsy' type genres - prog rock, etc. Those audiences can dig an instrumental track. A more pop oriented audience will be lost. You'll be done, and your audience will be going, "That was a big long intro and then they stopped."

Depending on genre, you can get away with crap lyrics. Generally speaking, if the music is connected to an activity that takes the audiences attention away from the lyrics because they're doing something else (esp. dancing, partying, etc.). Think Low by T-Pain or Soulja Boy. :roll: If the audience is listening to the song and actually caring about a good song, your lyrics had best be up to snuff.

If your audience is a pop audience (ie. you're making music that you hope lots of people buy), then your chorus has to be good. No, not good. Outstanding. It needs to kick ass and make the audience dying to come back for more. If your chorus is weak or non-existent, there's no point in even doing the song. Back to the drawing board you go.

You've heard the lyric "Don't bore us... get to the chorus!" Generally speaking, the chorus is what sells your song. The rest is just gravy.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Apr 18, 2008,
#4
I think the quality of the lyrics isn't so much an issue as the quality of the melody. Many great rock songs have had poor lyrics but great melodies. That being said, lyrics still can add a lot to a song.

Lyrics can also be edited and rewritten until they are good as well.

For this song, I don't think lyrics are essential because you have a lot of fairly melodic guitar playing. However, to improve the song, I would recommend shortening some sections and focusing more on melody.
WARNING:This post contains explicit portrayals of violence; sex; violent sex; sexual violence; clowns and violent scenes of violent excess, which are definitely not suitable for all audiences.
#5
Quote by axemanchris
I'm listening to other stuff right now as I surf, but here's my take on a philosophical/practical level.

Depending on the genre, you can get away with either instrumentals or crap lyrics. Instrumentals work best with 'artsy' type genres - prog rock, etc. Those audiences can dig an instrumental track. A more pop oriented audience will be lost. You'll be done, and your audience will be going, "That was a big long intro and then they stopped."

Depending on genre, you can get away with crap lyrics. Generally speaking, if the music is connected to an activity that takes the audiences attention away from the lyrics because they're doing something else (esp. dancing, partying, etc.). Think Low by T-Pain or Soulja Boy. :roll: If the audience is listening to the song and actually caring about a good song, your lyrics had best be up to snuff.

If your audience is a pop audience (ie. you're making music that you hope lots of people buy), then your chorus has to be good. No, not good. Outstanding. It needs to kick ass and make the audience dying to come back for more. If your chorus is weak or non-existent, there's no point in even doing the song. Back to the drawing board you go.

You've heard the lyric "Don't bore us... get to the chorus!" Generally speaking, the chorus is what sells your song. The rest is just gravy.

CT

Agreed, apart from the 'pop audience' bit. It's not that important that the lyrics are outstanding, just catchy. You could have something that's absolute gibberish as a chorus (eg. Little Richard's 'A whap-bama lou-lop, a whap bam-boo' in Tutti Frutti or The Beatles 'She loves you, yeah, yeah, yeah.') but as long as it's catchy, and in the right genre, it'll work.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Apr 19, 2008,
#6
Yeah, the lyrics consideration is kinda hard to put in a box. My figurative box is a good general guideline, but there really are tons of exceptions. TuttiFuitti is a good 'party' tune, but She Loves You is easily one of the most enduring pop tunes of all time, and the lyrics are really nothing but fluff. I'd never have written them, at least if I did, wouldn't have kept them. But then again, I haven't made millions of dollars touring the world with my music, so fair to say, the Beatles are probably the wiser.

Another angle: What makes a great lyric? Does it have to be insightful and demonstrate a worldly awareness? Can 'great' lyrics be nothing more than just universally catchy? A great melody need not be complex.... just universally catchy. Why could a great lyric not meet that same criteria?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Thanks everybody. This helps a lot.
"There is no hell. There is only France." - Frank Zappa
#8
don't fill up the entire song with lyrics. Just sing a few words, play a solo, sing a verse, let someone else do a solo, play a riff, another verse, you know what I'm talking about? Don't let lyrics screw up your music ;-)
#9
Again, that depends on your audience. A lot of audiences will lose interest with too many solos.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#11
Dude, that was a pretty damn good song. You might be able to add lyrics but its good as it is. Put some examples of the lyrics you have in mind and maybe record them.
The harmonized solo was really good
#12
This is everything from my notebook. This isn't all one song. They start getting better towards the bottom, so don't skip those...

I hide but no-one's there, I walk these streets a-lone
I try to get a-way, but my mind don't wan-na go
I can't see a-ny-thing not stand-ing in my way
I guess fo-re-ver here is how I'm gon-na stay

As the man of the dark, I'm an ever feared monster livin' inside your head

We're movin' fast
But we're not there yet
We'll be there soon
And then we'll regret
All the things we've done
To the place we live
Blackened Earth
Now that ain't it

Industry and Government reaping benefits from loss
While the peasents are all drowning in a deadly sea of fog
Much has been said, but nothing done
Convincing all [that] the battle's won

Life is just a stage, and the people merely players
You won't make it past auditions if you ever try to fake it
Can barely see it in your eyes that you're a phony in disguise
'cause you've been at this for too long
So long we've had to write this song
to let the whole world know you're plastic
Don't you think it's just fantastic
that your life's turned out this way
and 'till you change we're here to stay

I'm goin' down down deeper
like a screw that's bein' twisted
I'm a ragdoll puppet and I'm just about to lose
I'm sick of livin' here, 'cause I'm never gonna make it
livin' all my life in someone else's shoes

Hold your fire 'till it's over 'cause it may not ever die
And if it doesn't you'll feel sorry that you watched it all go by
You'd be a quitter in denial and you know that's not ever fun
And if it doesn't you'll feel sorry that you ever had a doubt
...

Never say die, because remember that your wishes come full circle
And once your dead then life's no fun and you won't get a second one

'cause you're the one who's staging
all these battles that you're waging
And being down just isn't all that much fun anyway
"There is no hell. There is only France." - Frank Zappa
#13
Damn that song is really good. Just sit down one day without your tv or music on. Just sit in complete silence. And then write down everything that comes to mind.
#14
yeah, really nice song.
I think you should leae the vocals if you can write instrumentles that good consistantly. Then again, i don't think i would like an hour of that, it would probably get pretty boring, pretty quick.
Just keep writing lyrics. You practise your guiar right? When you'd just stated playing guitar, could you write a song? Of course not, so don't expect it when your just getting to grips with lyrics. maybe try and write a full song a day, doesn't matter if it sucks, most of them will, but in a month you'll have a colletion of four or five songs you'l think ae band quallity, and by then you'll be good enough to write a decent/good/excellent song every time.
Last edited by davibrods at Apr 21, 2008,
#15
It's not really a question of lyrics. Most people don't really listen to the lyrics, particularly of a new band playing originals. Some catchy phrases, a good melody, and people will be listening.

As depressing as it is, a lot of your starting audience will not like you or your music-they'll be drinking in a pub, there to see one of the other bands, or just lonely and wanting to stay out of the rain. Catchy vocals not only help keep such people paying at least some attention to you, they also add a lot of energy to the performance.

As a new band, unless you want to be successful only in metal/goth/progressive clubs, you're going to need to pay at least some attention to pop sensibilities, and part of that is having vocals, I'm afraid. (Not that such places don't like singing, it's just a lesser part of those genre's 'sounds', being prepared to listen to solos).

Personally, I liked those lyrics, and think there's potential there coupled with a good melody for a song that people will really remember. Which is the important thing for gaining fans...if people can't try and hum it when they're walking home, it's not a 'live' song. Possibly great album material, but not what you really need earlier on.
#16
i think as long as the actual singing of the lyrics is good, people won't care if the lyrics aren't amazing. I personally don't listen to lyrics at all...as long as the lyrics aren't incredibly stupid (like constant immature profanity for example) then i'm fine with it.
#17
i have a song about gimps, i have a song about disapointment, i have songs about fcuking asian chicks... its all how you execute it... we have catchy guitar oriented guitar rock and make the lyrics light and poppy to keep things from getting uber serious
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#18
A song I used to do called 'Arsepidistra' in a band that I was in years ago called 'Clockwork Zombie' had the chorus;

'For coughs and colds,
Get stuffed pork rolls,
You couldn't take anything better.'

But it sounded like;

'Fuck offs and colds,
Get stuffed pork rolls,
You cunt take anything better.'