#1
Ok, so next saturday my band is going to go get a recording done in a professional studio. The recording engineer told us we had to rent an electric drumset for that, because it would sound better. I can understand that electric kits would be a lot easier to have sound good, because you dont have to tune the kit. But, he also says that the guitarists aren't supposed to bring there own amps, he says he has amps there for us! what the heck?!? Is this normal? Or does this guy not understand 'tone'? Please help me out here. -mnin
#2
I'm no expert on this, but I am pretty sure this is not normal. How 'professional' is this studio?
#3
If you want the sounds of your own equipment, bring your own gear, simple as that. If you want to use theirs, use theirs. It all depends on what you want it to sound like. I would insist on bringing my own gear because I have all my settings dialed in. This guy doesn't sound that professional, I'm guessing he doesn't have the equipment to mic an acoustic drum set properly which is why he is trying to get you to rent an electric. If I were in your position I'd show up with all my own gear anyway in case you don't like what he has. What would be worse than paying for studio time and not even like what it sounds like?
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#4
This just makes me wonder...why the hell all professional bands use acoustic drums?
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#5
Or why electric guitarists insist on using tube amplifiers?

It's about the sound and clarity. Electric drums do work well for other genres, and are more versatile, but they just don't sound as loud and good.

For the TS, have you tried other studios?
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#6
I wouldn't use his electric drum set - as for your guitars he is prolly lazy and wants to use a direct input with some software to modify the sound.

Call him tell him you want to get your own signature sound or you don't want to record there - he is being lazy.
#7
Well, I was thinking of just showing up with my all my gear anyways. But he offered to do 2 songs for free for us, so we can't just choose another studio.
#8
Also, i was venting to my bassist about this, and he just says "Calm down, he knows what he is doing" which makes me mad all over again. I tried explaining to him that it would be like if he told him he shouldnt bring his bass because he has one at the studio, but he wouldn't listen to me. It's definitely more difficult because I don't have much choice.
#9
E-drums are nice but every studio I've seen has equipment to record an acoustic drum set...

If they require an e-kit and you don't have a good sounding v-drum from Roland, go elsewhere...

as for other gear like guitar amps, bring your own.
#10
You say they're a pro studio. Do they have a website to support their credibility? If no, I'd wonder. If they do, can you give us a link? Do you at least have a link to their work?

Hell.... I just run a little project studio where I record indie bands and stuff, and even I have a website with samples and stuff.

About the e-drums. A lot of major label recordings are done with e-drums, but a lot aren't. The advantage of them is that you can edit a drum performance and get it basically perfect. You can also fly in different samples until you get your kit sounding the way you want it to. There are disadvantages too. When I rebuild my studio, I'm going to get an e-drum set, which will allow me more flexibility, and will require me spending less money on soundproofing. (which would be okay, given that I record acoustic drums only a few times a year)

About the amps. This is unusual that he would dissuade you from bringing your own gear. However.... it is quite commonplace for a studio to have gear for you to use. What kind of gear is he offering you to use? If he's got vintage Marshalls and Mesas and other high-end stuff, it will sound better than a lot of beginning players' entry-level gear. Maybe this is why he wants to use his gear and not yours? Obviously I don't know you or what you have, but it is a possibility to consider.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

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#11
Well, I he knows that we're a bunch of 15 year olds, so I think that he thinks we have lower end gear, which isn't entirely true. I have a marshall mg50 that i run my gt-8 through, and i love the tone that you can get from it, but then again, through a tube it would probably sound better.
#13
yea a Marshall MG amp is low end gear IMO but if you like the tone you get from it, go ahead and use it.

E-drums are nice but you have to spend quite a bit of time on setting it all up to trigger well enough and even then, you wont get the same response as an acoustic kit.
but they are nice and I use a Roland module myself. They do have their limits though. The TD10, 12, and 20 modules are for live and studio use whereas the other modules are for small gigs and home use IMO..being that they only have a few outputs and are not greatly adjustable.
#14
Quote by moody07747
..being that they only have a few outputs and are not greatly adjustable.


For outputs.... all ya need is one. MIDI. You get the data into your computer, each drum on its own track via the MIDI cable, and from there, you can use software samples, or route it back to the drum module and back into the recorder, or whatever you want/need to do to get the best sound.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#15
I did forget about the MIDI setups..

But even so, you need a module that you can really tweak when it comes to triggering parameters. The new TD9 module is nice, the dynamics are extremely close to an acoustic and its sounds/triggering compares to the TD12 and 20 modules.
#16
He is just starting up, he's recording us for free because he needs more in his portfolio. His stuff is good, www.reverbnation.com/greensteve, but because he is just starting out he might not have a large studio, or sound proofing to support an acoustic. Thats what I think, i really don't know.
#17
An acoustic kit WILL sound better if it is miced up and mixed right. And if you really want your sound on the guitars hen bring your own equipment.

My band had a bad experience with a lazy sound engineer on our 1st demo. He didn't know how to EQ or mix and it turned out sounded bad, the place we recorded in replaced him soon after. We had a kickass engineer for our 2nd demo but we had a ****ty drummer. For our EP we had another kickass engineer who wanted us to double track the guitars, it turned out pretty damn good except the bass guitar is too loud.

If he is offering to record you for free then i'd go with it, but if you have to pay then i'd look elsewhere.
#19
my best guess is that the guy knows what he's doing and he's just saving himself the hassle from trying to record MG's..

i'm willing to bet he's got some better amps there that he's been working with for years and knows the sweet spots on them for optimal recording tone.

as far as the vdrums.. i wouldn't do it if its anything less than a TD-12.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#20
The engineer sounds like a retard. Tell him It's acoustic, or his portfolio suffers.

Acoustic drums always sound better. No question. It could be, on the other hand, that he lacks the equipment to do drums. So, it could still suck either way.

About amps, tell him the sound you want comes from the amps you own.
#21
Quote by the chemist

Acoustic drums always sound better. No question.


Well... a well-tweaked e-drum kit with high quality samples played by a good drummer will sound better than a crappy acoustic kit in a crappy room using crappy mics and a crappy engineer.

You can't overgeneralize. E-drums can sound amazing. When they don't, it is often because of a poor kit, poor samples, or a poor drummer.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#22
They are still not natural. They clog up the CPU with wasted space running sample kits that really may sound GREAT... but you can't get the definition of each humanistic note no matter how well you program the drums... If you hit the note lighter most samples are taken at what at least 5 velocities (very soft, soft, medium, hard, very hard... blah) that that is no where near the amount of velocities that could be actually produced during a recording session. Some softwares actually just take the velocity and lower the volume of the output sample - which doesn't have a good effect either.

It takes a really skilled engineer to get this one right ...

But yes they can sound better - or worse.
#23
Quote by ovdojoey
They are still not natural. They clog up the CPU with wasted space running sample kits that really may sound GREAT...


You must be thinking of plugins. Still, with E drum kits, there is a sacrifice of quality for versatility, that is obvious.

For the TS, try to find an engineer willing to do acoustic drums, take that drum track, and let this engineer handle everyone else's recording, including your MG tone if you're 100% you want it exactly.
Quote by keiron_d
thank you sooooooo much for the advice Fast_Fingers...i would hug you if i could...i looooove you!


True love exists in UG. Can you feel it?

Recording Guitar Amps 101
Last edited by Fast_Fingers at Apr 23, 2008,
#24
Well, I just found out yesterday that there was a misunderstanding. He has a fender hotrod deluxe there, but he said he usually uses the amps the guitarists bring (which makes sense). He also said that his studio is too small for an acoustic kit, and that e-drums sound better and most labels use them. He has a td-6 there, hooked up to sampling software on the CPU via MIDI. Idk, here's his page www.reverbnation.com/greensteve
#25
His studio must be pretty small not to be able to fit a drum kit in it. Personally, I think this does make it sound a bit dodgy, the way he's implying that professionals only use e-drums, which is obviously not true.

However, I'm not quite sure what the big issue is. It's free, isn't it?
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#26
You can always re-record if it turns out like ****, but at least give it a try eh?
#27
yeah, exactly. I just posted here because I thought it was strange for him to not let us use our own amps, and wanted to know a little more about how good v-drums are for recording. Thanks a lot guys. I hope we have fun this weekend!
#28
eh.. i have a td-6 and i wouldn't use it for recording. (cymbal sounds suck.. and the toms are pretty lame). but since he's using MIDI to a computer, i'm willing to bet its so the TD-6 can trigger samples from DFH or a similar program..

which in fact have PHENOMENAL sounds..

have fun!
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