#1
I've been trying to teach myself to read, but I'm not sure what songs to start off with. I plan on using guitar pro and removing the tablature part and learning the song with the standard notation. What are some good simple songs that have guitar pro that I can learn. I'm open to any music, just no metal. Please help.
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#2
I actually tried using the same method a few months ago, but I had exams and kindof stopped bothering. I just started with easy RHCP songs like Otherside and Dani California, and some Muse stuff. I was getting the hang of it too, I should probably start that up again
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#3
What's actually scary is how difficult seemingly simple songs are to read. I have a Rolling Stones song book and while the basslines are nothing crazy the nuances of rhythm is maddening. The other problem is that with Guitar Pro you can cheat by listening to it. I recommend grabbing a book (Hal Leonard Bass Method Books 1-3) and just chugging through it.
#4
Do those have tab in it? Because if it has tab in it then I'll see it out of the corner of my eye and cheat. So I guess what I'm looking for is a beginner bass book without tab.
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#5
A real book can help you out.
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#6
The Hal Leonard Fast Track books (worst books ever) do, but the Bass Method Books 1-3 do not, until the second book when they introduce it, and even then only sporadically. To be honest, I don't even read the tab when I'm reading a song with both anymore, sometimes I don't even realize it's there unless my teacher asks me if I was reading the tab.

Also, Funkbass made a good point. It's a pretty valuable thing to take a treble clef Real Book and transpose some melodies into bass clef, then play them.
#7
Jazzy is totally right recommending those books. I also suggest
Joel Di Bartolo: Serious Electric Bass if you want to hit yourself over the head with the theory at the same time as learning to read.
#8
I would think some jazz walking bass would be good to start off on, especially to get just all the notes down then working on sight reading rhythm at the same time, using scores more with rhythmically complex bass parts.

Check out some Miles Davis.
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#9
I made some flash cards to help myself link bass clef with a fret on a 4 string bass. Basically I had the note on the stave on one side, and that note in any/all the positions up to 7th fret.

It might help to learn how to read music first and then link that with the bass fretboard, I guess it may be harder to do both at the same time. I can't speak from experience since I knew how to read bass clef from playing piano, I just didn't know them on the bass itself.

Other than that, it's just "learn by doing" as people have said. I played in my school's Big Band for a while, I was S**** and I eventually left, but it helped my reading a lot.
#10
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
What's actually scary is how difficult seemingly simple songs are to read. I have a Rolling Stones song book and while the basslines are nothing crazy the nuances of rhythm is maddening. The other problem is that with Guitar Pro you can cheat by listening to it. I recommend grabbing a book (Hal Leonard Bass Method Books 1-3) and just chugging through it.

You can mute the track and turn off the numerical tab.
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#13
Quote by Deliriumbassist
But if you're serious about doing it, then you would mute it, and knock off the old tab bit.


But then you think, aw what could one listen hurt. And the answer is: somewhat, somewhat.
#16
I learned by joining jazz band and slowly and painfully learning to read bass clef. I play viola too, so it was pretty simple going from alto clef to bass.
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#17
Like anything else, it takes some concerted effort and practice. If you can read treble, yes transposing to bass can accelerate the process considerably.

I played treble clef instruments for quite a while, but moving to bass took about a month before I was comfortable reading in bass. Now I am a sight reading demon in both, tho' if I try to play treble clef on bass it does take a few seconds to make the mental adjustment.

The Hal Leonard books I -- III are great and I would recommend a Real Book as well, but the Bass Clef version. And grab all sheet music you can get your hands on. Flea markets, charity shops, book sales are all great places for sheet music and books. And there's a bunch of internet sites with public domain sheet music, so google away!
#18
you can buy books with only the music in it but its mostly classical but if you can read the treble cleff the bass cleff is fairly easy.If its a c on the leger lines on a treble cleff it would be an e. the bass cleff is two notes lower than the treble cleff fairly easy. I play classical trupet in a orchestra and you learn quite a bit more on how to read music when you have 5 mins to sightread and then play.
#19
i started teaching bass lol i can now read music upside down and in about 8 other ways up
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#20
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
I'm just speaking from what I've experienced. I've found it difficult to learn to read from guitar pro. I tried for about a week and then moved on, realizing I wasn't getting any benefit.

You tried. You are not everybody.
Lord Gold feeds from your orifices and he wants to see you sweat.
Lord Gold probes you publicly and makes your pussy wet.
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