#1
Im having some trouble switching chords, and I was wondering how I should help it.

Is it nessesary to be able to switch chords such as c and G7 fast?
Because I can switch but it takes like half a second.

If im learning 4 different chords, is it nesseary to be able to switch those chords interchangably, in any order?
#3
yes, it is necessary. it may seem hard now, but if you keep practicing, you will get it in no time
#5
yea practice makes perfect! and switching the chords quickly is necessary for most situations because just imagine a song with a rythm guitar part stopping everytime they switch chords. it wont sound very good, pretty choppy.
#6
Quote by One on Sunday
yea practice makes perfect!

Almost. Perfect practice makes perfect.

There's a technique called posing that might help. Just place your fret hands in the chord shapes you're trying to do without pressing down on the strings. Make sure your fingers/hands/arms are as relaxed as possible. Just get used to slowly moving your hands from position A to position B, very slowly at first. When you feel comfortable, pick up the pace, but be mindful that you don't want any tension in your muscles at all. Do that for 5 - 10 minutes every day when you practice before you start playing, and after a while you'll find the chord changes become more fluid.

Worked for me anyways

Hope that helps.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
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Play what you love, love what you play
Last edited by Garou1911 at Apr 19, 2008,
#7
damn Garou, im gonna have to try that out, i always practiced just playing the chords, so i think this will help
Turquoise Team Beasts!
#8
i felt the exact same way you feel right now when i was trying to learn how to switch between chords. you really just need to practice and finger the chords differently (if necessary) to get to the next chord the fastest.
MyGear
Schecter Hellraiser (EMG 85/81 + 18v mod)
LTD SC-207 with EMG 707
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Some random Peavey 4x12 slant cab
Boss Chorus Ensemble + Boss DD-3 + Dunlop Crybaby Wah + Boss NS2
#9
If you want to speed up your chord forming I suggest you try out this little technique.

Take your guitar and have your fret hand away from the guitar neck.
Bring your fret hand to the guitar neck and form the chord you are practicing.
Remove your hand completly from the guitar neck

Repeat these steps untill you get to the point where you can form the chord like nothing.

Once you can nail the chords you can work on putting them together. Making your own little song out of the chords can make this seem much more of a breeze and could add a little fun to your practice =]
#10
Quote by Garou1911
Almost. Perfect practice makes perfect.

There's a technique called posing that might help. Just place your fret hands in the chord shapes you're trying to do without pressing down on the strings. Make sure your fingers/hands/arms are as relaxed as possible. Just get used to slowly moving your hands from position A to position B, very slowly at first. When you feel comfortable, pick up the pace, but be mindful that you don't want any tension in your muscles at all. Do that for 5 - 10 minutes every day when you practice before you start playing, and after a while you'll find the chord changes become more fluid.

Worked for me anyways

Hope that helps.

For me, that didn't help at all. Besides, if you learn traditionally you can learn strumming techniques chord variations and all that good stuff.
#11
pratice makes perfect. everybody who learned to play a guitar knows that. however there's a little trick that looks kinda cool in a electric guitar, but you can use it for a acoustic too:

when you're playing a song and you have a strumming pattern like D DU UD U (D for down and U for up), when you're going to the last stroke, which would be Up in this case, lift your fingers and do the next chord in the sequence


that would be something like this (using as example G and Em chords):
D D U U D U | D D U...
G G G G G x | Em Em ...

in the x you hit the strings but without doing any chord formation, and at the same time preparing your fingers to do the Em
#12
and in case of barre chords like F or B, you can improve your speed by switching between C and F, doing always C F C F C. it may look boring but i've learned to do the F pretty fast that way
#13
Quote by Dendar
For me, that didn't help at all. Besides, if you learn traditionally you can learn strumming techniques chord variations and all that good stuff.

Well, I'm not suggesting it as a replacement for regular practice. Just as a warmup exercise. It helps to get the muscles used to moving to different positions without tensing up, thus slowing down the transition.

Then again, it may not work for everyone.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play