#1
I'm really new to microphone recording. I currently own a cheap microphone set (check the link below). I play a breedlove AD20/SM and am simply looking for a clean, solid acoustic sound. 1 of the mics is a large condenser mic, the other a much smaller 1. He0llpp ME!

Check out the mics I'm using
#2
i use the same mics, great mics but very low quality loud preamp/direct box. Use the 991 to record the acoustic. If you point it directly in front of the soundhole it will sound extremely bass'y. Place the mic pointing around the 12th fret about 6 inches away. I find that this gives the result in a great sound. (this is also in the little manuel/booklet that came with your mic set if your still wondering, it also has some nice ideas for studio setups)

Edit: im a little confused if your looking to mic up your guitar for live play or recording due to your thread title and the beginign of your post. I would not use the 991 for live sound, the 990 is a better choice but both give alot of feedback in a small room. the 990 will also pick up any sounds that are close.

'67 Gibson SG Standard
MXR Phase 90 | Ibanez Tubescreamer TS9 | Vox V847A Wah-Wah
'65 Fender Bassman
#3
it's for home recording purposes. Should I stick to using the smaller condenser mic and not even use the larger one? I read somewhere that i should put the larger one near the body of the guitar to capture the vibrations of the body. True or no?
#4
Quote by lespauluva28
it's for home recording purposes. Should I stick to using the smaller condenser mic and not even use the larger one? I read somewhere that i should put the larger one near the body of the guitar to capture the vibrations of the body. True or no?


If you are recording in stereo, place the large one near the bridge and the small one at around the 12th fret, pointing towards the sound hole.
#5
Quote by Cheers
If you are recording in stereo, place the large one near the bridge and the small one at around the 12th fret, pointing towards the sound hole.



I have the same set, and I use this set up pretty much, and adjust to get the tone I'm looking for.

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
#6
For the best quality your going to need some decent recording software. I use Sonoma Riffworks. It's about the easiest to use and you can use factory preset setting for your guitar or if you are a production genius you can set it they way you want it. I fall into the first category and use factory presets. Does a very nice job and sounds very professional. It's the easiest software I have found and made for musicians not for someone with a BS in sound science.

Sells for around $99.
#7
Audacity works pretty well and its free if you don't have recording software. But if your using an interface to record with you probably already have some software included.
#9
Quote by johnos
Audacity works pretty well and its free if you don't have recording software. But if your using an interface to record with you probably already have some software included.


I've used Audacity before. Problem is unless you have a degree in sound science it's pretty hard to figure out how to get good sound out of it. My hat is off to the guys than can make it work. I use it some for editing after I have already done the production that I want. It's a useful program.