#1
For the first time, a job I might actually be interested in.
Does anyone have any info on the subject, such as salary, employment demand, and education required?
#2
That is one of the fields I am interested in after high school. I'm a sophomore right now, and it is coming up quick.
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#3
Get to the best college possible course, Over here we have he Tonmeister course, appernetly onlt 16 people a year get on it. Find the best and the starting wage is ridculous, But start now, Mix friends demos, for free if you have to and keep everything you've done.

Buy yourself a decent piece of recording equipment, Over here we use edirol as a basic recorder hooked up to sonar, If you hook it to a laptop complete portable studion.

Take up a music course that has recording and sequencing, but it does come down to personaly experience aswell.
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#4
Quote by cliff_em_all
and the starting wage is ridculous,.

ridiculous as in, really low, or really high?
Originally Posted by TheKermal
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#5
Quote by Huggy (-.-)
ridiculous as in, really low, or really high?



High generally if you get out of a good sound and engineering college. One of the college's around guarantees you a job with a 30k per year minimum, 30k at the age of finishing the course (around 24) is brilliant.
Quote by ZanasCross
I'm now so drunk that even if my mom had given me a blow job at aeg 2, i'd be like I'm a pmp, butches.!

If this even madkes sense... if yhou sig this, Iw ll kill you.
#6
wow this is odd,

all the other threads on UG about audio engineering say its a dying, very poor paying and hard to get into.

now i dont know what to believe
#7
it's not a dying thing for sure, because people are always going to need people who know how to make recordings and live shows sound good. But it is very hard to get into.
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#8
the best way to get into it though, is volenteering, like at a church or something, i know my church uses a sound board, and there are some people there with connections and that can give you jobs in it, aside from churches (because i know some UGers will catch on fire if they enter one) you could try schools (like drama plays and such) or stuff like that.
#9
we got like a 12 month course available in Sydney, its really expensive and the work demand after you finish is generally quite low, its who you know that counts.
#10
Quote by jack_mckinnon
wow this is odd,

all the other threads on UG about audio engineering say its a dying, very poor paying and hard to get into.

now i dont know what to believe


It's slightly on the poor-paying side, but it all depends on where you get employed. And yes, it is a very competitive job to get into.
#11
ok, audio engineering is not generally well paid at first. after a few years, it can skyrocket, and make you a fortune. its also good to note that your only as good as your last project. if you mix a cd in a really bad way, people will simply not go to you, no matter how good your previous work was.

I agree that the best way to get into this is to start volunteering. talk to soundmen after small gigs if you can. Always offer to help strike/load out gear and perhaps offer them a drink after if you want to continue the discussion. make it clear that you want to learn. people like nothing more than teaching somebody who really has a passion to learn how to do something. if done correctly, you might get called to help at other gigs, or your name gets passed about.

also, get to college. make sure its one that has a good reputation. doing work experience will help you getting into college, cos it shows you really want to do it.
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#12
“As a freelancer, you will never have any guarantees when you're getting paid work. And that's why it's important to always have your own projects you can be working on during your own time. You may work five paid days in a row, and then have nothing until something comes along two weeks later. You will be at the mercy of the client: If they schedule until 12 a.m. and they want to go until 6 a.m. — you do it. You will be a "sound slut" for-hire at an average rate of $20/hr. And that's when you're actually engineering, not just assisting or interning. And don't go off after you read this to do your career math by multiplying $20 X 40 thinking that you could live on $800 per week, because much of the time you'll never make anything close to that. You'll have times you'll be lucky to make $800 in an entire month. Be prepared to live long stretches with no health insurance. Life as an engineer is life often lived without a net.” (http://www.studioreviews.com/engineering_career.htm )

Glad to see my research in careers class paid off (well, kind of...).
#13
In England any degree is good to have. Especially any engineering degree, they're broad and engineers are high in demand. Infact we are offered lots of bursaries to encourage more engineers.

I was thinking of doing acoustical engineering but decided it wasn't for me. It doesn't really have much to do with music theory or anything. I don't even know if instruments were a large part of the syallabus, but either way, I chose do to Mechanical Engineering in the end.

So to sum up, getting a well paid job should not be a problem with a degree in any type of engineering. Getting a job specifically related to acoustics/audio may be different, but if you enjoy the subject I say do it.