#1
I'm trying to learn alternate picking, and have so far managed to get my single string licks up to 132-144BPM per minute. As such I was going to go on to the cross string licks such as

-----------------
-----------------
---------4-------
-4-5-7---7-5-4
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However I realized that when I was playing on the lower strings (D-A-E) I have a tendency to anchor my fingers on the strings below to steady them, rather than hovering over the strings. I kind have my fingers fixed in them and so can reduce wrist movement. Is this the wrong technique/ will it hinder my ability to 'float' across the strings as I approach more complex licks? Should I start from scratch with a looser style?
#2
Its not necesarliy the wrong way but if youre going to anchor, put one of your fingers in the scratchplate below the top string. thats what i do, but the advice i should be giving is dont anchor at all - i just did it naturally and now im used to it - but if you learn without anchoring you will have a much better technique.
#4
Quote by mikeman
Yeah, thats bad technique.

+1
Practice playing with a floating hand, it will feel akward at first but your technique will become so much better with time.
#5
Quote by Mahavishnu Fan
I'm trying to learn alternate picking, and have so far managed to get my single string licks up to 132-144BPM per minute. As such I was going to go on to the cross string licks such as...


It's sounds like you're following a path that will lead you to trouble with your picking.
I know, because I tried the same sort of thing.

It seems reasonable, at first, to work on your alternate picking on a single stringle
before doing cross strings. So you start out on 1 string and in the effot to pick
faster and faster you tense up your arm and immobilize it and anchor your hand in
order to keep it positioned over that one string. This is nearly useless for any
picking that crosses strings and it will ingrain bad picking habits.

I now think it's much better to start on your alternate picking by specifically working
the cross-string aspect first. Immobilizing techniques won't work for this and you'll
be learning to control your arm which will leave you in better shape in the long run.