#1
does anyone know what notes the extra strings play? i know on all my guitars its EADGBe, if you dont know that you do not deserve a guitars. but i want to know because im looking into getting one
#2
7: B
8: F#
Brigadier of the 7-string legion. 7>6

Fender Telecaster
Schecter Damien 7
Engl Fireball
#4
Some guitarists (notably Lenny Breau) have been known to use a high A string as well.
#5
Both the two lower strings are the same interval (Perfect Fourth), as between your other strings (Excepting g and b). Thus it is easy to extend patterns. The lowest strings can be dropped to A and E, making drop-A (A-E-A-D-G-b-e) and drop-E (E-B-E-A-D-G-b-e) tunings, which are similar to Drop-D.
#7
thanks but my question was this. at standard (concert) tuning, what note will the extra strings play when played open?
#10
Quote by james4
^then (as mentioned), it's a lower B on a 7, and on an 8 it can be a lower F#, or higher A.


Some jazz guitarists will add the higher A on a 7 string. They can come in as low as a 2 guage string I believe, but are generally 5ish.
#11
Quote by Avedas
Some jazz guitarists will add the higher A on a 7 string. They can come in as low as a 2 guage string I believe, but are generally 5ish.


Do you have a link for this? I haven't heard of anything lower than .007. I thought anything thinner just wouldn't be able to hold together, since piano wire is relatively thick for their high strings (C8). It is probably like .020 gauge, and stretched until it acts like a steel rod.
#12
all in all, is it harder to play the 7 or 8 string guitar? and is it a good investment?
#13
^^Isaac, look for octave4plus strings. They have down to .004 at the moment i believe, and are working on smaller. They also make bass strings up to .175...

Yes and no for the first question--it's not harder to play, but to truly use it well, you need to learn lots more shapes for chords, arps, and scales, yes to the second if you are going to utilize what it gives you.
#14
Quote by TheShred201
^^Isaac, look for octave4plus strings. They have down to .004 at the moment i believe, and are working on smaller. They also make bass strings up to .175...

Yes and no for the first question--it's not harder to play, but to truly use it well, you need to learn lots more shapes for chords, arps, and scales, yes to the second if you are going to utilize what it gives you.


That looks cool. I'd like to get my hands on a .175, but I'll probably just stick with .145 since its much cheaper, and going below A0 is hard to distinguish pitches.
#15
Quote by isaac_bandits
That looks cool. I'd like to get my hands on a .175, but I'll probably just stick with .145 since its much cheaper, and going below A0 is hard to distinguish pitches.


lol

Must... Try....

E Standard 3 octaves down.

#16
Quote by Avedas
lol

Must... Try....

E Standard 3 octaves down.



I was thinking more like tuning my 5 down an octave... I can get my current B0 down to E0, but its incredibly floppy, and almost impossible to identify pitch in that register.
#17
Quote by surge666
all in all, is it harder to play the 7 or 8 string guitar? and is it a good investment?


I have a Washburn WG587. It's one of the least expensive seven strings that I've seen. I would highly recommend it. Personally, I don't find it harder to play. It just takes a bit of getting used to. And the neck is a bit thicker, but still it's not uncomfortable (for me at least).
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#18
Quote by surge666
all in all, is it harder to play the 7 or 8 string guitar? and is it a good investment?


its only a good investment if you will actually use all 7 strings. otherwise you can just tune down a 6 string. i know players that only use the top 4 strings.