#1
I've written a song which is all in 4/4 time, with quite a long solo section in it. The backing to the solo is exclusively in triplets, which aren't used anywhere else in the song, and the lead line is always in either triplets or whole bar length notes. After the solo, the song goes back to the 4/4 chorus.

What I was wondering is, would it be more correct to think of this as a switch to 3/4 time (or actually I think 6/8 would be more appropriate in this case), or just a whole load of triplets?
#2
mix the triplets, change the time, rewrite the solo, it's all gonna work, no rules in music, right?


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#3
Triplets.
Unless the tempo changes with it.
Also, if it still has the 1, 2, 3, 4 pulse it's either 12/8 or 4/4.
Just leave it 4/4
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#4
not to be a dick, but why does it matter? as long as it sounds good then why should all the technical things matter?
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#5
The better you understand what you're playing, the more improvements and alterations you can make on the fly.
If you didn't know the key of a song you'd have a much harder time soloing over it.
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#6
Keep it in 4/4. I'm assuming the drums aren't going to be playing triplets with you.
#7
well, it quite depends on what the drums are playing.

and when you say the lead guitar either plays triplets or whole notes, are the whole notes for 4 beats or 3 beats?

either way, it doesnt really matter for the guitars, the time signature just changes the feel of the drum beat a little bit.
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#8
Quote by dm1925
not to be a dick, but why does it matter? as long as it sounds good then why should all the technical things matter?
Written music is supposed to convey the sound of the sound in the easiest way possible. This isn't a sound issue; it's a notation issue.


I'd leave it in 4/4 and just write in the triplets or switch to 12/8 and adjust the tempo accordingly; 3/4 would not be appropriate here. For instance, if your original tempo were (quarter note)=120, then the triplet section would be in 12/8 with (dotted quarter note)=180. You can calculate your tempo with the ratio 120/180=(Your tempo in 4/4 time)/(Your tempo in 12/8 time).
#9
Wow, thanks for all the quick replies.

As BGC mentioned, this is much more of a notation issue than a sound issue.

However, I'm still unsure about whether to make the drums stay in 4/4 or, as pointed out here, 12/8. I'm starting to think that 12/8 might work better, especially if I led into it by using triplets in the drum line during the last bar of the 4/4 section. But I'm not sure. I don't have any easy way to test it out.

The rest of the song stays totally in key and in time, so I'd be a little nervous of making the change on the drums. However, the song is quite a slow one and goes on for around 6 minutes, so maybe the change would be good.
#10
12/8 would be just like triplets in 4/4; there would be three notes per beat.

If you were just to play 12 beats in a measure, you might be better off writing it with 2 bars of 3/4 or alternating between 4/4 and 2/4 (your call, but make it easy too understand).

If you write it in Powertab, I can download it and give you some guidance. The notation really does depend on ther sound; 12/8 is very different from 3/4.
#11
I would probably leave it as 4/4 and use triplets, as changing the tempo and the time signature at once could probably be confusing. Someone reading the peice would have to read the time sig, and the tempo, then work out that three eigth notes have the same duration as a quarter note in the section before. This can all be conveyed much faster by using triplets.

For instance, if your original tempo were (quarter note)=120, then the triplet section would be in 12/8 with (dotted quarter note)=180
If the pulses keep the same duration (which is what I'm assuming is happening since he is think of them as triplets) then the tempos would be (quarter note)=120 for the 4/4 section and (dotted quarter note)=120 for the 12/8 section.
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#12
12/8 would be just like triplets in 4/4 in my opinion the tempo would be different .
12/8 would be 1/3 slower tempo , but you said that in you other post anyway i think !
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#14
triplets are a division of a note into 3 parts instead of the usual 2.

3/4 and compound sigs makes no changes to any note length, they just count differently.

going into 3/4 from 4/4 would not be anything like playing triplets. trust me ive had this argument with my drummer many of times, it was the difference between 'a good groove' and 'insanely fast/slow'.
#15
Quote by Galvanise69
^^ Switching it to 12/8 would give quite a wierd notation for the Semibrieves eh?

If it was exclusivley semibrieves (whole notes) in the solo would that be an example of polyrhythm?

I assume your drums are playing in 4/4 too?

If thats the case, I would leave it in 4/4, and just have the triplets as an example of "polyrhythm"


a 4/4 over a 12/8 isnt a polyrhythm. but I forget what its called... an example of a polyrhythm would be to play quarter notes and dotted quarter notes at the same time. Each rhythm fills in the gaps of the other, while 4/4 just accents the 12/8 rhythm. someone correct me if I'm wrong.
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#16
Quote by Ænimus Prime
If the pulses keep the same duration (which is what I'm assuming is happening since he is think of them as triplets) then the tempos would be (quarter note)=120 for the 4/4 section and (dotted quarter note)=120 for the 12/8 section.
I knew that! You're right.

But, the 8th notes in 12/8 at 120 would be as fast (nps wise) as 8th notes at 180 bpm, if that means anything to anyone.
#17
i'd stay with triplets. when composers do that, the only have the write the first triplet, then as long as you group your follow notes in three's its assumed you know they're triplets. that's how the did it in the classical era anyway