#2
.........................................none
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#4
I don't think any.....

Though I could be mistaken?

Tapping was only introduced to rock by Van Halen though it came from Jazz.
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#5
None. Nobody tapped back in the 60s. If you want to learn cool bluesy songs with tapping, start with Van Halen.
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#6
he didn't, i dont think he did. eddie van halen was the one to make it popular but a few others did it before him, not jimi though.


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#8
Quote by guitarplaya322
He did one handed tapping alot though... i think

He definitely did one hand tapping a bunch.
#10
Quote by Friedmaniac
None. Nobody tapped back in the 60s. If you want to learn cool bluesy songs with tapping, start with Van Halen.


Van Halen got the idea of tapping from Jimi Page in the heartbreaker solo.
#11
^Jimmy Page. JIMMY, NOT JIMI!
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#12
Randy Rhoads was tapping way before Van Halen.....Don't think Hendrix ever tapped though...
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#13
Quote by guitarplaya322
He did one handed tapping alot though... i think

That's called legato, not tapping. It's tapping if you TAP the fretboard with your right hand finger.
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#14
Quote by SG Man Forever
That's called legato, not tapping. It's tapping if you TAP the fretboard with your right hand finger.


Technically its still legato, except you just use 2 hands (obviously).
#15
Quote by BladeSlinger
Randy Rhoads was tapping way before Van Halen.....Don't think Hendrix ever tapped though...

Van Halen (Album) - Released 1978
Blizzard Of Ozz - Released 1980
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#16
Quote by Crabs111
Technically its still legato, except you just use 2 hands (obviously).

That's like saying that pinch harmonics and natural harmonics are the same thing. They are the same basic idea, but one =/= the other.
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#17
Quote by Alter-Bridge
Van Halen (Album) - Released 1978
Blizzard Of Ozz - Released 1980

This proves nothing, as Randy and Eddie both played in bands (VH and Quiet Riot) who were very popular locally in L.A. before they made it big, and probably heard each other play several times before either band recorded anything. However, I read in an interview with someone who knew Randy (I think it was Rudy Sarzo, but I'm not sure at all) that he actually avoided tapping for a while because he didn't want to be accused of copying Eddie, which means that Eddie probably was the first one to tap like that when performing in a rock context.

In response to the TS though, I'm pretty sure I've seen footage of Hendrix playing where he used "tapped" harp harmonics with his left (pick) hand, but I have no idea what song it was on.

And SG Man, if you play a phrase without picking the first note, it's tapping, whether you use one, two, or twelve hands. Traditional legato would be to pick the first note on each string, then play the rest with hammer-ons and pull-offs. I'm pretty sure Hendrix did both of these (though obviously with only his left hand on the fretboard) because again, I've seen performance footage where he's playing a lead that moves from one string to another and he reaches up and adjusts his mic or something with his pick hand.
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#18
Quote by ezza61
Van Halen got the idea of tapping from Jimi Page in the heartbreaker solo.


Jimmy Page doesnt tap in that solo. He does hammer ons and pull offs.
#19
Quote by SG Man Forever
That's called legato, not tapping. It's tapping if you TAP the fretboard with your right hand finger.

Technically that's slurring.....

I guess it's safe to say no one can tell who started tapping first between Eddie and Randy....
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#20
Originally Posted by ezza61
Van Halen got the idea of tapping from Jimi Page in the heartbreaker solo.

Van Halen got the idea because Page would pull off to an open string, and Van Halen decided he would use his right hand finger as the nut, moving the pull off up and down the neck
#21
^ He means he saw Page do that segment at the beginning where he plays a repeated legato with one hand; the 5p2p0 sequence on the G string, I believe. EVH just added the idea that it was possible to do this with his picking hand and fretting hand instead of only the latter. I think that's what ezza61 is getting at.
#23
EVH didn't invent the technique, but he popularized it and deserves to get credit for inventing it, though it was actually used in jazz before VH became famous.
#24
As far as the "who invented tapping?" argument goes, I think that EVH was the first to tap in a rock segment, but that Randy was better at it.
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#25
Paganini was tapping in the 1800's. Take that.
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#26
The practice of tapping has existed in some form or another for centuries. Paganini utilized similar techniques on violin. Another similar technique, called selpe, is used in Turkish folk music on the instrument called the bağlama. Tapping techniques and solos on various stringed acoustic instruments such as the Banjo have been documented in early film, records, and performances throughout the early 20th century. The clavichord was an early acoustic keyboard instrument that used a mechanical hammer to "fret" a string for each key. It was followed by an amplified version, the Hohner Clavinet in 1968.

Jimmie Webster made recordings in the 1950s using the method of two-handed tapping he described in 'Touch Method for Electric and Amplified Spanish Guitar', published in 1952. Webster was a student of electric pickup designer Harry deArmond, who developed two-handed tapping as a way to demonstrate the sensitivity of his pickups. Webster's approach was not popularly adapted. The two-handed tapping technique was also known and occasionally used by many 1950s and 1960s Jazz guitarists such as Barney Kessel who was an early supporter of Emmett Chapman [1].

In August of 1969, Los Angeles jazz guitarist Emmett Chapman discovered a new way of tapping with both hands held perpendicular to the neck from opposite sides, thus enabling equal counterpoint capabilities for each hand for the first time. Chapman redesigned his 9-string long-scale electric guitar, calling it the Electric Stick. in 1974 he founded Stick Enterprises, Inc. and began building instruments for other musicians. With over 5000 instruments produced as of 2006, The Chapman Stick is the most popular extant dedicated tapping instrument. Chapman influenced several tapping guitarists, including Steve Lynch of the band Autograph, and also Jennifer Batten.

Randy Resnick of the Pure Food and Drug Act featuring Don "Sugarcane" Harris used both one and two handed tapping (hammering) extensively in his performances and recordings between 1969 and 1974. This was mentioned in an article in Guitar Player Magazine written by Lee Ritenour in 1970. He also recorded the tapping style in 1974 on the John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers album "Latest Edition". He was attempting to duplicate the legato of John Coltrane's "sheets of sound".

One of the first rock guitarists to record using the tapping technique was Steve Hackett from Genesis. Two examples of Hackett's complex tapping can be heard on the song "Supper's Ready", from 1972, and "The Return of the Giant Hogweed", from 1971. Harvey Mandel, well-known for his psychedelic guitar playing, also employed 2-handed fretboard tapping in the 1960s. Mandel was one of the first rock guitarists to utilize this technique, years before Eddie Van Halen and Stanley Jordan came along.

Tapping was also used by Ace Frehley as early as 1975, for his live solo at the end of the song "She" during Kiss's performance on the Midnight Special. The technique would remain a part of Frehley's solos from 1977 through the Kiss reunion during "Shock Me". Various other guitarists such as Frank Zappa, Billy Gibbons from ZZ Top, Brian May from Queen and Leslie West from Mountain were using the tapping technique in the early 1970s as well. Ace Frehley and Frank Zappa tapped with a pick rather than tapping with the fingers.

Eddie Van Halen helped popularise the tapping technique for the modern audience. From Eddie Van Halen demos and live performances it appears that he started tapping in late 1976/1977. He has mentioned in an interview he adapted the technique after watching Jimmy Page's "Heartbreaker" guitar solo at a Led Zeppelin concert in Los Angeles in 1971 but Eddie Van Halen's comments on the origins of his tapping technique vary from interview to interview. Perhaps the most famous employment of tapping is the short piece "Eruption" on the first Van Halen album which was released in 1978, which features very fast tapping triads and formed the blueprint for heavy metal lead playing throughout the 1980s. He also patented a pop-out stand that enables a musician to employ the technique while standing and moving around.

During the 1980s two-handed tapping developed much further with many players such as Stanley Jordan using a 2 or more finger tapping technique. Tapping on the bass guitar was not as popular as it was on the guitar but bass guitar players such as Billy Sheehan, Stu Hamm and Dave LaRue have used tapping. The Math Rock genre is also known for its extensive use of tapping. Artists such as Don Caballero and Maps & Atlases, for example, both employ extensive and intricate tapping pulling from many different areas of the technique.


wikipedia does it again.
#27
Quote by Missingno476
I'm pretty sure Hendrix did both of these (though obviously with only his left hand on the fretboard)


You mean his right hand. I bet a few threads describing Hendrix techniques are a bit confusing because of the left-handedness.
#28
I've read that Jimi tapped, using both his hands, while playing Tax Free in Copenhagen. I can't find any more about it other than that.
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