#1
Is it a bad thing to be self taught?

I don't have money for a teacher, I used to, but then I couldn't afford it, and I only got into basic interval type stuff with him (I hear from other music people that he was a bad teacher anyways), and now I've been reading and practicing the Theory Lesson on this site, I also have this book that's jam packed with advanced theory stuff, is this enough? Would I be able to pick up on things that I miss, is this enough to make me 'good' in some time?

So my question is: Should I be self taught, or should I just try to get a teacher really really bad (I'd have to save for a while)?
#2
its like teaching yourself math or history.

its really up to you. if you feel like you're learning it's working.
#3
So long as you learn it, it doesn't matter who teaches you. Though, if you can't find the motivation or time to study it by yourself, then it's worth getting a teacher.
#4
Just do as much as you can. Teacher's obviously help alot, that's why we pay them (or get paid for being one of them), but it's not like you should feel the need to throw your rent money away to get one. If you can afford it, great, go for it. If not, it's not a huge deal, theory helps you understand what is going on within the music, but it's not essential to playing your instrument. Get a good book on theory and supplement it with this forum and you should be fine until you're able to afford a teacher for more advanced theory.
#5
I think an important part of learning theory is also APPLYING it. No use knowing it if you can't use it.
#6
Click links in my sig.


Edit: I just assumed with was a 13-year-old not wanting to learn theory. That pic was actually inappropriate here.


Click the theory link in my sig.
#7
No, I'm a 17 year old kid (turned 17 today, woo!) that very much WANTS to learn theory, from what I've gathered over the years you can't really seem to have music without the theory, like peanut-butter and jelly.

I'd also like to ask that you click the link in my first post

Thanks, though.
#8
That link covers a lot. I suggest reading through the MT FAQ as well. Those two things contain a TON of information.


After that, go to a university book store and look for some of the books used in more advanced theory classes.


And if/when you go to college, feel free to minor or double major (I suggest having a backup plan if music doesn't work) in music; you'll learn a ton!
#9
There's so much informations avaliable today.
My music teacher never taugh me the pentatonic scale..i'll say that much.lol
And he defferently didn't practice for me.
There's 5 patterns that fits perfectly like a jigsaw puzzle.
Memorize it like the back of your hand.

There's a different between minor and major pentatonic. You can hear it.

I had music lessons evensince i was 7. So it drilled into my head at very
young age.

okay here's the theory..it's every other notes for basic chords. unless you wrap
it. then you can make up you're own names..becuase this is the make your
own thoery thread.lol

This i suggest you memorize..it'll be a refference piont.

1/2 steps between the 3rd and 4th....1/2 step between the 7th and octive.

1,4,5= major...those dudes are HAPPY dudes.
2,3,6= minor...these guy...they're SAD all de time for some reasons.
7 = dimnish...this guy...he's just plain evil..that's why he's along..he's SCARY.lol

Do your power chord..the root and the 5th...
whatever the 5th is...that'll be the next scale on the Circle of 5th.lol (on the sharp side) Cycle down using the 4th.lol

There's 12 frets (double dot/inlay) between octive... (chromatic scale)
Call it whatever you want..there's only 12 different pitch in the circle of fifth.
and I'm not planing on hammering more frets on my six string in the near future.lol

don't get lost with the terms...minor= less.
You know...as in minorities.lol
a double minor...lol just play 1 full step down (2 minor) (two 1/2 down)

it's easy all the minor chords has the 3rd flat..that why they're minor.

Augment...i guess when you augment stuff...you ADD or more.

SUS...it would be like..John got suspended from playing his guitar too loud in school
so they REMOVED him for the THIRD time.
Last edited by Ordinary at Apr 21, 2008,
#10
Quote by blue_strat
So long as you learn it, it doesn't matter who teaches you



perfectly said
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#11
Quote by Ordinary
big post


That's all basic stuff I learned within my first week, I didn't just start, I've been self-teaching myself for a while now, I was just asking if I'd be missing anything.. I'm nearing the end of the tutorial I linked to..
#12
Quote by Dog--
Is it a bad thing to be self taught?

I don't have money for a teacher, I used to, but then I couldn't afford it, and I only got into basic interval type stuff with him (I hear from other music people that he was a bad teacher anyways), and now I've been reading and practicing the Theory Lesson on this site, I also have this book that's jam packed with advanced theory stuff, is this enough? Would I be able to pick up on things that I miss, is this enough to make me 'good' in some time?

So my question is: Should I be self taught, or should I just try to get a teacher really really bad (I'd have to save for a while)?



There is alot you can learn on your own. But keep in mind learning from the internet your likely to get bits and pieces intermingled with opinions, arguments, and misinformation. Alot of people have issues because they dont always learn these bits and pieces in order, and often make their own theories based the information (or misinformation) that they've obtained online.

One of the most effective ways to study theory, if possible, is to take a structured class. That way you learn one step at a time, starting with the most fundamental concepts, and build from there.

Not everyone is able to take a class though, so if your learning "on your own" for now thats great, but I would still highly recommend a class, or studying with a teacher if your able to.
#14
Quote by GuitarMunky
There is alot you can learn on your own. But keep in mind learning from the internet your likely to get bits and pieces intermingled with opinions, arguments, and misinformation. Alot of people have issues because they dont always learn these bits and pieces in order, and often make their own theories based the information (or misinformation) that they've obtained online.

One of the most effective ways to study theory, if possible, is to take a structured class. That way you learn one step at a time, starting with the most fundamental concepts, and build from there.

Not everyone is able to take a class though, so if your learning "on your own" for now thats great, but I would still highly recommend a class, or studying with a teacher if your able to.
This is what I agree with the most. It's basically: Sure you can start learning by yourself, but have a healthy amount of suspicion for the validity of your sources.

And like someone said, make sure that you apply your theory through your instrument and in relation to your ear(ex. like once you construct a chord, play it on the guitar) to make it something that will truly help you become a better/more creative guitarist(easier said then done).

Btw, I don't think you'll have any problems whatsoever learning basic theory on your own... like sight reading, intervals, circle of fifths, scale construction, chord construction, Major/minor progression construction, basic progressions.

When you get into stuff like, modes, modulation, chromaticism, chord functions and altered/secondary chords, voice leading, and basically harmonic backgrounds and melodic construction, that's when I highly recommend taking everything with a grain of salt.

Oh yeah, learn piano/keyboard if you can!
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#15
Do it with style and grace now.
Mix it up.

I've yet to master my guitar. There's just too many directions and style.
I just pick what I like and what i deem would help me at a given time.
The axis pitch system was a leap for me.

There's hundreds and hunreds of different types of scales, not just the diatonic system.
I've yet to memorize 5% of them.

The diatonic are just the basic, once seemed complicated for me.
I had to fine a ways of simple music comprehension in order to grasp these other
types of scale.


Just keep on expanding and keep it open.
#16
Quote by :-D
I taught myself entirely.


As did I, although I asked a music instructor trainer friend of mine a few things when I was starting out.

I learned quite a bit just lurking discussions on this site. It's pretty easy to tell who knows what they're talking about. I've also read some random articles here and there.
#17
I'm a fellow Rookie... and I've asked myself that question too. But I firmly believe that talent's talent. If that guitar feels like it belongs in your hands... then so be it. Sure, anyone can be taught scales, theory, technique... but i believe you gotta be born with it. I've met many players who've took lessons, been playing for years... and I outplay them... with only a year and a half of experience. It's love bro. You love something, work hard... practice. Forget everything else.