#1
Hi!

I have a question about playing two lead lines together, but with different pitches (and two guitars ).
For those who don't understand what I mean:
Bullet For My Valentine often use(d) it, here a video on youtube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zi-e5XXRs6I
Starting at 0:11

First, what's the name of this? xD

How do I know which notes I can play if I have a lead line?

In my case it's

e |--10----10----10--12--13--12--10-|-(10)--10--12--13--15--13--12--10-||
b |------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------||

First two notes are Q, the rest E.

So what do I have to do?

Cheers!
...
#3
Ah, well it's called harmonizing. To use it, you have to have a decent knowledge of theory. Basically, it's when one person plays a note, and the other plays a note (for example) three scale tones higher. Three is the one most often used. So in A minor (which has the notes A, B, C, D, E, F and G) if somebody plays an A, the other would play a C. If somebody played an E, the other would play a G.
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#4
It's called a harmony.

What it is is playing two related notes together, usually 3rd's or 5th's.

It's kind of like playing a chord, but with different instruments playing one of the notes each.
if your line is /-10-10-12-13-/ then a harmony in 3rds would be /-13-13-15-17-/
with each note in the second line being the relative 3rd of each note in the first one.

consult a chart of scales or a music theory book to learn how to write cooler and more complex harmonies, they can get really fun
#5
it's called harmonizing in your case it will be
b |--12-12-12--14--15--14--12-|-(12)--12--14-15--17-15--14-12---------------||
#6
It's called harmonising.

Once you know what key the melody is in, you have the second guitar play the same thing a set interval higher or lower. If you haven't already, learn a bit about scales and intervals before you try harmonising.
The more you know, the less you understand.
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#7
Quote by Sellbodys
It's called a harmony.

What it is is playing two related notes together, usually 3rd's or 5th's.

It's kind of like playing a chord, but with different instruments playing one of the notes each.
if your line is /-10-10-12-13-/ then a harmony in 3rds would be /-13-13-15-17-/
with each note in the second line being the relative 3rd of each note in the first one.

consult a chart of scales or a music theory book to learn how to write cooler and more complex harmonies, they can get really fun


Thx, that sounds great!

So what did you do there? Which third is this, major or minor? Or is it something different?
I know the modes and a few scales and stuff, but I don't know much about intervals. ^^"

@Reages: Are you sure about that? It sounds strange, at least in guitar pro...


I'll get my guitar now and think about what you all said... ^^

Thx very much!
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#8
Suffice to say you can't really know scales unless you know intervals, so it's worth going back over scales to see what you missed.

Start by learning the notes on the fretboard, then learn all about the major scale...modes can wait, they're not that improtant.
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#9
well...you can cheat. If you have a nice guitar processor and your other guirarist
is too drunk all de time.lol

set the hamonizer with one channel to output all of the notes 1 1/2 ptich down.
Becuase it'll be all relative.lol

Set the other channel to to have it output one full octive.

Mess with the delay and volume and stuff like that
Have the your main output louder than the other two.

or you can use the pitch bender.lol
Have the flxiable pitch channel around 80%-90% or just split the channels.
Better yet, couple the non flex pitch channel with a crybaby.lol
This way when you pump the pedal, it'll cry and scream at the sametime.
Becuase the flex pitch channel will emulate your drunk guitarist.lmao
Last edited by Ordinary at Apr 21, 2008,
#10
^ wtf? lol

@steven seagull
Well I know how to play a scale on the 3 treble strings, but I don't exactly know what notes I am playing. xD
I know that there are certain intervals between notes of a scale, but I don't really know how many notes there are in those intervals. ^^
I started with the ionian mode with my teacher, then lydian, aeolian, dorian...
But I am not that far, we just started with music theory some lessons ago.
It's more interesting and usable than I ever thought.

Cheers!
...
#12
let me rephrase some of the responses...


its called harmony.. dont abuse it like everybody else nowadays.


if you want some examples of some well placed harmony check in flames, they usually use 3rds and they do it tastefully, not 'for the hell of it'. bodom also has some really great off-the-wall harmonies scattered about. for use in chords check arch enemy.

i would NOT go off of bullet for my.. whatever.. to learn about harmony. or anything on the radio rather.
#14
Just to add my bit and try to clarify about major and minor thirds, when harmonising in thirds you normally use both.

It is possible to harmonise just using minor thirds (so every note guitar 2 plays is 3 frets above guitar 1), which gives you a very tense sound, like it's building up to something, and similar to runs using diminished chords.

It's also possible to harmonise with just major thirds (so every note guitar 2 plays is 4 frets above guitar 1), which I'm not sure of a good term to use, but try it and see.

However, what bands like Bullet do, and the same applies for In Flames, Arch Enemy and all the other bands out there that use harmony in thirds, is to use both major and minor thirds.

If you are playing in the key of C major, you will be using these notes (with harmony you tend to stick quite firmly with the notes in your key):

C D E F G A B

Imagine guitar 1 is playing each of these notes in order, one by one. Now guitar 2 wants to harmonise to this. What it will do is look at which note is 2 degrees in the key above the one that guitar 1 is playing. In this case, the note which is 2 degrees above C is E, so guitar 2 plays E. The gap between C and E on the fretboard is 4 notes, so this is a major third.

Then, guitar 1 moves onto playing D. Now guitar 2 will move up and play F, so as to keep 2 scale degrees higher than guitar 1. The gap between D and F is only 3 notes, so this is a minor third.

E to G is a minor third, F to A is a major third, G to B is major and A to C is minor. I will make the point here that although B would be harmonised with D, and this is a minor third, it should be used with caution as it would actually be used to form a diminished chord, rather than a minor, like the others.

This would work for any major key, just alter the notes in the key accordingly.

Hope this was helpful.
#15
In short, look at the chord progression of the key you're in and derive the thirds from that.

For example, if you're in C major the chords are

C Dm Em F G Am Bdim

the major chords contain a major third interval, the minor and diminished ones a minor third. So, to harmonise in thirds in the C major scale you'd ideally want one guitar to play root notes, so...

C D E F G A B

And the second guitar would follow the thirds.

E F G A B C D

the interval between the two notes isn't constant, but if you experiment with it you should hear that it sounds better. If you harmonise completely in major or minor thirds it'll sound kind of "off".
Actually called Mark!

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#16
If you want to hear some other cool harmonized leads for inspiration listen to some allman brothers as they tend to do this on many of there songs.