#1
hello there friends.
ive been playing 6 days short of 5 months and i just would like to know if im on track or not
the problem i have - many of my teachers have told me this - i try to run when i should walk.

i still cannot do pinch harmonics, and have been trying for a long time now.
i know little theory, very little ( i know of sclaes and chords thats about it. )
if somebody says play a solo, id be dumbstruck as i know of none.
my pinky finger is very weak and i use pointer and index finger to do power chords.

i can tap, pritty well, not quite fast enough yet but fast enough so it sounds good.
Quote by Code

e|----------------------------------------------------------|
B|--------------------------------------------------------------
G|--------12--12----------------------9--9-----------------
D|----10-----------10-------------7---------7------------- - ETC.
A|-12-------------------12-----9---------------9---------
E|----------------------------------------------------------


i can sweep pick this ^ at about 160-180 bpm which is so slow its pritty pointless but hell.

i can pull off/hammer on that standard stuff and slides/alternate pick
i can play most songs that are put in front of me,

you could call me a standard metal,lead guitarist.


thanks for any constructive critism
#2
I've said this before, and I'll say it again, because no one seems to get it.


We need to hear you play in order to give critisiscm (or however you spell it.
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#3
Quote by Joey Radical
I've said this before, and I'll say it again, because no one seems to get it.


We need to hear you play in order to give critisiscm (or however you spell it.


ill record some stuff and put it on youtube. what would you like?
#4
everybody learns different things when first starting guitar and everybody learns at different speeds... dont feel bad about not being able to do **** in 6 months of playing.. just practice it
#5
I would definitely suggest working on pinky strength the pinky can be very useful (by the way pointer and index are the same finger, I assume you meant pointer and ring). Search around the lessons and forums to learn more theory because that is the basis for soloing, well actually its the basis for making all music. But like Joey Radical said it is difficult to give criticism when we can't hear your playing. We only know what you tell us and you can't tell us a weakness that you don't already know.
Stop whining and learn your theory!

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#6
In all honesty, if after 5 months you can knock out a few chords and change between them fairly smoothly I'd say you were doing pretty well.

Pinch harmonics are unimportant, so is tapping, so is sweeping and you don't need to be worrying about any of them at all yet....you're trying to go way too fast. Guitar isn't a race, the worst thing you can do is jump from new thing to new thing when you haven't learned the last thing properly.

Concentrate on your rhythm chops - make sure you're familiar with different time signatures and can play in time. Also keep building up your vocabulary of chords and make sure you understand how they're constructed...barre chords are a given but try not to make too much of a distinction between barre and open chords in your head as ultimately they're the same thing.

Make sure you can transition between palm muting and normal strumming easily, and that you're right hand is loose, yet accurate - your right hand is your metronome, it's what keeps you in time. If it's too tense or too rigid the you're playing will be rigid. Also learn how to use right hand muting effectively, both to help clean up your playing and damp strings but also as a rhythmic technique in its own right.

As far as lead goes, again the basics are what you need to focus on. Make sure you can pick accurately and cleanly, hitting only the string/s you want to. make sure your bends are accurate and in tune, make sure that when you slide you always hit the note you want and that your hammer ons and pull-offs ring clearly.

Most of all, make sure you LISTEN to what you're playing rather than blindly following tabs, if you're learning a solo make sure you're following the chord changes and grouping notes together correctly. And always, always make sure you're in time - as in make sure your picking and fretting is synchronised so you don't get double notes.

When it comes to theory, again, don't try to learn too much at once - there's a lifetimes worth of study there. Just try to make sure that you have enough theory to understand the things you play, so make sure you know the notes and intervals a chord is comprised of and know what you can do to change that chord into something else. All you really need to worry about at this stage is learning the notes on the fretboard and follow that up with the major scale.

You really need to have all that stuff under your belt before you're going to be able to practically use stuff like tapping, pinch harmonics and sweeping. None of those are remotely essential techniques for playing the guitar, they're what you use to embellish your playing or you use them when you've reached the limits of more conventional techniques - and at 5 months you've barely scratched the surface.
Actually called Mark!

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#7
Quote by steven seagull
In all honesty, if after 5 months you can knock out a few chords and change between them fairly smoothly I'd say you were doing pretty well.

Pinch harmonics are unimportant, so is tapping, so is sweeping and you don't need to be worrying about any of them at all yet....you're trying to go way too fast. Guitar isn't a race, the worst thing you can do is jump from new thing to new thing when you haven't learned the last thing properly.

Concentrate on your rhythm chops - make sure you're familiar with different time signatures and can play in time. Also keep building up your vocabulary of chords and make sure you understand how they're constructed...barre chords are a given but try not to make too much of a distinction between barre and open chords in your head as ultimately they're the same thing.

Make sure you can transition between palm muting and normal strumming easily, and that you're right hand is loose, yet accurate - your right hand is your metronome, it's what keeps you in time. If it's too tense or too rigid the you're playing will be rigid. Also learn how to use right hand muting effectively, both to help clean up your playing and damp strings but also as a rhythmic technique in its own right.

As far as lead goes, again the basics are what you need to focus on. Make sure you can pick accurately and cleanly, hitting only the string/s you want to. make sure your bends are accurate and in tune, make sure that when you slide you always hit the note you want and that your hammer ons and pull-offs ring clearly.

Most of all, make sure you LISTEN to what you're playing rather than blindly following tabs, if you're learning a solo make sure you're following the chord changes and grouping notes together correctly. And always, always make sure you're in time - as in make sure your picking and fretting is synchronised so you don't get double notes.

When it comes to theory, again, don't try to learn too much at once - there's a lifetimes worth of study there. Just try to make sure that you have enough theory to understand the things you play, so make sure you know the notes and intervals a chord is comprised of and know what you can do to change that chord into something else. All you really need to worry about at this stage is learning the notes on the fretboard and follow that up with the major scale.

You really need to have all that stuff under your belt before you're going to be able to practically use stuff like tapping, pinch harmonics and sweeping. None of those are remotely essential techniques for playing the guitar, they're what you use to embellish your playing or you use them when you've reached the limits of more conventional techniques - and at 5 months you've barely scratched the surface.


i hand you 1 interweb sir!

thankyou.
#8
Can anyone reccomend some excercises that go from palm muting to normal strumming? It's something I would like to practice also to work on my palm muting.

Video's, or guitar pro songs or just simple exercises will do.