#1
I need some physics help.
So I come to you, pit, and all its knowledge (I'm sure you see right past my buttering up). I need to know where, or how can I find the answer to find out propulsion, velocity, and all that other stuff, in a canoe that you (180 pound man) are paddling.
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#2
surely it depends on the speed of the river?
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#3
You actually expected an answer with so little information? All you've given us is mass. All we can figure out with that is mass. Give us the full question with all the numbers and everything and you might get an answer.
#4
I have to make all of that up, which is why I need your help!
I just made up that weight, thinking you guys could surely figure it out

What would I need to know in order to figure that out?
McLovin is my hero!

It's not the going that the pit cares about.
It's the coming.
#6
You need to know at LEAST 2 peices of information before this can be solved.
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#7
you will be going 7 mph.

hope that helps
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#8
just put them as x
But specifically, WHAT is needed to figure this out
McLovin is my hero!

It's not the going that the pit cares about.
It's the coming.
#9
Umm, you'd probly need to know what forces are involved, possibly friction coefficients, depends how complex you're expected to get this, what level is it? (P.S. sorry if I get terminology wrong, I've learned it all in french)
#10
Its basically for a science fair, I have to build a small canoe (did it already) and now I have to explain some physics, and sciences on it.
McLovin is my hero!

It's not the going that the pit cares about.
It's the coming.
#11
Coefficients of friction of the canoe, paddles and water
Surface area of the canoe and paddles
Force exerting by man to move the canoe

Those are a few basic things youd need to know, but it's going to take a lot more to get an accurate answer.
#12
Quote by McLovin-
Its basically for a science fair, I have to build a small canoe (did it already) and now I have to explain some physics, and sciences on it.
No offense, but your project is fundamentally flawed.

This is what happens when kids do science projects:

Build a (insert name of vehicle here)...

(or do the volcano thing with vinegar and baking soda)

...then figure out how this is even vaguely scientific and not simply an excuse to build a canoe, or a hovercraft, or a remote control car...or whatever.

It is, in fact, simply a lame excuse to build a canoe.


What is your question?

Science asks a question and then proposes an answer, then tests the answer to find out if it's right or wrong.

How about wide canoes are slower than kayaks because of friction?

Apply the same force to both (say a propeller and a motor)...

Measure the speed.

Make a conclusion: kayaks are faster because there is less friction.
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#13
Win. ^
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#14
Quote by Bubonic Chronic
No offense, but your project is fundamentally flawed.

This is what happens when kids do science projects:

Build a (insert name of vehicle here)...

(or do the volcano thing with vinegar and baking soda)

...then figure out how this is even vaguely scientific and not simply an excuse to build a canoe, or a hovercraft, or a remote control car...or whatever.

It is, in fact, simply a lame excuse to build a canoe.


What is your question?

Science asks a question and then proposes an answer, then tests the answer to find out if it's right or wrong.

How about wide canoes are slower than kayaks because of friction?

Apply the same force to both (say a propeller and a motor)...

Measure the speed.

Make a conclusion: kayaks are faster because there is less friction.


Well none really taken, I was going to try and do the volcano .
Seriously, I just have to explain SOME science, I really don't care what it is. I just thought the propulsion thing would be a good idea.
(self paddling, no motor, or propeller involved)
McLovin is my hero!

It's not the going that the pit cares about.
It's the coming.
#15
Quote by McLovin-
Well none really taken, I was going to try and do the volcano .
Seriously, I just have to explain SOME science, I really don't care what it is. I just thought the propulsion thing would be a good idea.
(self paddling, no motor, or propeller involved)


Talk about newtons laws. It moves because when you push against the water with the paddle, you get equal opposite reaction which moves you where you want to go. Also you can say that the only thing stopping it is friction with water as otherwise, according to one of newtons laws (1st i think) unless an exterior force is applied, an object in motion will stay in motion. **** like that, just about how it moves, etc.
#16
Propel the canoe will human power (after measuring the maximum force you can apply using an oar), and then compare this to the propulsion seen when small explosives are used in some sort of cavitating apparatus at the back of the canoe.
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#17
I figure this would be a good time to ask this:

I need to find "it".
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#18
Quote by lespaulrocks39
I figure this would be a good time to ask this:

I need to find "it".


Win
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