#1
As I progress through my evolution of liking different styles of music, I've started to like darker and heavier styles, like Lamb of God, Nile, and Necrophagist. When these bands throw a solo in the song, they just sound so much darker than what I can pull off. I can write some badass riffs that have a similar style to the bands above, but I can't solo to that genre at all! Hell, I can solo in the blues/rock genre (even though I'm not a huge blues fan, I do appreciate the skill), but I just can't do an amazing solo that would fit in with a song of the said genres. I'm not saying I want to be the next Karl Sanders, I just want to be able to solo along with the genre.

So here is the deal. How can I begin to solo in this genre? Any scales I should learn? I can sweep a little bit and that would be a good addition for the soloing, but what else would help?
#3
1 - Chromatics

2 - Diminshed scales

3 - Diminshed arpeggios

4 - Harmonized in forths

That's evil in four lines right there.
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#4
for speed really fast sextuplet runs (6 notes on each string sort of runs, very fast)
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#5
shred a minor scale and throw in all the things mentioned above. to truely be able to do it as good as these guys you should read up about music theory
#6
Quote by metal4eva_22
shred a minor scale and throw in all the things mentioned above. to truely be able to do it as good as these guys you should read up about music theory


+1

Karl Sanders from Nile took jazz theory lessons in high school.

I was just re-reading the TS post and he mentioned Lamb of God; most of Mark Morton's solos are pentatonic and blues based so the evil sound in his solos is almost entirely from the stuff he's soloing over; try coming up with some more evil riffs and soloing over those; that should help infinitely.

Edit: On the subject of Karl Sanders; he uses a .010 on his highest string, tuned down to B and he has a scalloped fretboard so if you're thinking about doing those huge (and they really are huge!) bends he does quite a bit I would reconsider. Also he has been known to use fretless 11-string guitar so be careful what you're trying to imitate.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Apr 21, 2008,
#7
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
+1

Karl Sanders from Nile took jazz theory lessons in high school.

I was just re-reading the TS post and he mentioned Lamb of God; most of Mark Morton's solos are pentatonic and blues based so the evil sound in his solos is almost entirely from the stuff he's soloing over; try coming up with some more evil riffs and soloing over those; that should help infinitely.

Edit: On the subject of Karl Sanders; he uses a .010 on his highest string, tuned down to B and he has a scalloped fretboard so if you're thinking about doing those huge (and they really are huge!) bends he does quite a bit I would reconsider. Also he has been known to use fretless 11-string guitar so be careful what you're trying to imitate.

I guess it's time I take up that music theory!
#8
Quote by RPGoof
I guess it's time I take up that music theory!


Yes you had; there is not a single player in the world who would be hurt by knowing a little theory.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#9
Quote by RPGoof
I guess it's time I take up that music theory!

^indeed
Something that was indirectly mentioned: it's not just the riffs these guys solo over. The notes the bassist plays are at least as critical to the tone of the solo as the riff and the solo itself because everything is heard and judged according to the root note beneath it. People joke about not hearing/needing the bassist, but without the bass heavy music isn't quite as heavy and a good riff will only get you so far.
#10
hey and while you're at it, id like to listen to some of those badass riffs you've written...