#1
hey guys. my girlfriend and her friends work for world vission and they have been given the task of putting on a concert, of witch all proceeds will go to charity. my band has been asked to be the host band, and we are also up for the challenge. and that gives us 7 months to organise bands/raise 6000 dollars for production/ promote the event. all we know for sure at the moment is the venue and date. the capacity is 1200 ans tickets will probs be 20 bucks. can anybody give me some advice for raising money, designing posters and getting 1200 people to come?

btw we are all 15/16
#2
Quote by spiderfizz
hey guys. my girlfriend and her friends work for world vission and they have been given the task of putting on a concert, of witch all proceeds will go to charity. my band has been asked to be the host band, and we are also up for the challenge. and that gives us 7 months to organise bands/raise 6000 dollars for production/ promote the event. all we know for sure at the moment is the venue and date. the capacity is 1200 ans tickets will probs be 20 bucks. can anybody give me some advice for raising money, designing posters and getting 1200 people to come?

btw we are all 15/16

First off, get more bands involved, but not too many. If it's an all day event, you'll need about 6 or 7 bands. Because it's a charity event, the genre can be wide open so you can have totaly different stuff like a metal band, a reggia band, a pop band ect. but make sure they all have decent followings, the idea is after all to raise as much cash as possible. Because you're opening it to many different genres, you're also gaining audience members that you maybe wouldn't normaly attract.
Obviously, you want the bands to perform for free, but it's always a good idea to offer traveling expenses to bands that are coming from out of town.

Try and get some sort of all-round circus entertainer to do 10 minutes between acts (while the bands are changing over) and make sure he/she is well placed along with the rest of the bands on the poster, this makes it look more like a family event which will attract even more people. (make sure non of your bands are going to be swearing on stage if there are going to be kids present)

Go around a few local shops asking them to donate an item each to raffle off and have plenty of people going around the crowd selling raffle tickets. The better the prizes, the more raffle tickets you'll sell, so if you can't actualy get anyone to donate something that's pretty decent, like say a TV or a DVD player, it may be an idea to buy something out of advanced ticket sales funds.
Also, see if you can auction off few things too, asking bands to donate CDs, T-shirts, memorabilia ect generaly works well to provite items to auction. (it may also be an idea to plant someone in the audience who will bump up the auction prices slightly)

Posters and tickets should be fairly decent quality. Posters should be full colour and at least A3 size. Look at poster designs from 60s festivals which tended to have lots of bright colours in them. Have some decent quality tickets designed and printed and on sale well in advance, at least 3 months. You could ask local record shops and other retail places to sell them for you.

Get in touch with local radio stations and ask them to give your event a few mentions, likewise with any local press.
Above all, get your poster everywhere, in at least a 25 mile radius of surrounding towns and make sure they have all your ticket outlets on them. It's also a good idea to ask local companies to sponsor the event or make a donation, in exchange for having their company logo on the poster, which everybody within a 25 mile radius will see.
#3
why do you need to raise $6000 dollars to put the event on, putting on a gig costs a fraction of that amount? tbh ive put on charity gigs an youd be lucky to raise that much for the gig, would be better to put the 6k straight to charity

you say your girlfriend and her friends have been given the task of putting on a concert but it sounds like all theyve done is asked you guys to do it. If theyre putting the gig on surely the promotion side of things is all up to them.

not to sound cynicle, but sounds like your going to do all the hardwork & theyre going to take the prestige
#4
Agreed with everything said so far.

Here is something we ran up against. Ticket price. We did a show at a theatre that had a capacity of about half of what your room is. It wasn't a charity gig, but whatever....

We thought we had all our bases covered. We did up colour posters. We had tickets professionally printed. We got (multiple spots) coverage on community and network television. We had print media, both independent and major newspaper. We got commercial and campus radio plugging us on air and on their website. We posted it on various entertainment websites. We had a variety of music genres. We had a venue where ticket prices generally start at $20. We priced ourselves at $12 for Gen. Adm. and $15 for reserved seating at the front.

What happened? Let's just say that attendance wasn't nearly what we hoped. Our problem, in retrospect, was that people just aren't willing to drop that kind of money on bands they don't know. Sure, you can get family and friends to come out, but there is a limit as to how far that will take you, and that limit will be determined in part by the price of tickets. Our acts were all professional quality. All of them had full-length CD's available, or an EP available with a full-length in the works. Half had touring experience outside of the province. It's not like we were all a bunch of hacks.

My point.... if you're going to charge more than about $10 for admission, you'd better have a draw. Simply being a charity gig won't be the 'draw' that you need. It's not going to make 'that' much difference to the average person when they decide to shell out $20 or not, whether the money goes to the bands or World Vision.

So, you need to do one of two things:
1. Bump your ticket price way, way down. At least half.
2. A major coup would be to get a good draw who will be willing to do it for free, or next to it. You know... being a charity and all, you might be successful. It needs to be someone that people know - a recording act that the average person on the street knows. Not just a band at your highschool that all your friends talk about. The beauty of this approach, too, is for the other bands participating. It's something to put on your band bio if you can say, "We opened for XXX at YYY venue."

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
Quote by axemanchris
What happened? Let's just say that attendance wasn't nearly what we hoped. Our problem, in retrospect, was that people just aren't willing to drop that kind of money on bands they don't know



yes which is why u shud right in BIG lestters the differnt music GENRES and THE FACT THAT IT'S FOR CHARITY!!!!!!!!!!- say which charity as well, pple will pay 10 - 15 bucks for a charity concert.


-post in loacal papers (wont cost too much)
Last edited by thedefrockednun at Apr 22, 2008,
#7
As I say, ultimately, if people aren't that interested in going, it won't make a difference if it is for a charity or not. They don't want to drop more than $10 on bands they don't know - regardless of genre, and regardless of where the money is going. Where it does make a difference is that, if it is a charity, the media is more willing to help you out.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Quote by axemanchris


So, you need to do one of two things:
1. Bump your ticket price way, way down. At least half.

Absolutely agreed
Quote by axemanchris

2. A major coup would be to get a good draw who will be willing to do it for free, or next to it. You know... being a charity and all, you might be successful. It needs to be someone that people know - a recording act that the average person on the street knows. Not just a band at your highschool that all your friends talk about. The beauty of this approach, too, is for the other bands participating. It's something to put on your band bio if you can say, "We opened for XXX at YYY venue."

CT

Hmmmm, it's one of those fine line thingies innit.
A large drawing band can generaly bring it's own set of problems.
Very few well known bands will actualy play for free for charity, but they may drop their price by as much as half of what they normaly go out for, but that can still mean paying them a hell of a lot of money.
Even if you can get a well known band to waive their appearence fee, there's no way you'll get them to waive their travelling expenses, and if their travelling plans involves an articulated lorry for their gear and a tour bus for the band, that can still be a lot of money.
We did a charity gig a couple of years ago (to raise money for a family that had lost everything, including three daughters, in a house fire) with M3 (Mick Moody, Berni Marsden and Neil Murry from Whitesnake) and although they played for half the price they would normaly play for, it was still a lot of money out of the charity fund.
We actualy organised a seperate charity gig with 4 bands on the bill just to raise enough money to make sure we had enough to pay M3 for the main charity gig. As it turned out, we needn't have worried, because their gig made plenty of money to cover all the costs, but that's not the point. Before doing anything like this, you HAVE to make cirtain that you have the cash up front to pay for it, just in case something goes wrong and you don't make as much money on the night as you thought you would. Plus, we couldn't just use our beat up old 5k PA rig with these guys, it had to be a state of the art 20k rig that we had to hire in from out of town at quite a cost. plus we also had to provide accomodation for them in a local hotel.
But they were a huge draw, we actualy had to turn about 200 people away at the door in a 2000 seater venue.
In retrospect, I don't think we could have raised as much money without a large drawing band, because we'd have had to charge about a 3rd of the ticket price and we still wouldn't have been able to sell out the venue like we did with M3. So yeah, it was worth doing, we made a lot of money for the charity, we also had a blast supporting these legends and M3 also had their entire gig recorded and later released it as a live DVD, (infact, there's an idea, if you video the entire event and edit out all the best bits to go on a compilation DVD or CD of the day, you can carry on bringing money into the charity for a while through the sale of the DVDs an CDs, but you'd need to get all of the performers permission first) so they gained from it too, but it wasn't without it's headaches and it was risky. If, for instance, another better known band happened to be playing localy on the same night, it could have easily all gone wrong with just a handfull of people turning up and us losing a lot of money from the charity fund.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Apr 23, 2008,
#9
Agreed entirely.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Quote by FuzzyBear
why do you need to raise $6000 dollars to put the event on, putting on a gig costs a fraction of that amount? tbh ive put on charity gigs an youd be lucky to raise that much for the gig, would be better to put the 6k straight to charity

you say your girlfriend and her friends have been given the task of putting on a concert but it sounds like all theyve done is asked you guys to do it. If theyre putting the gig on surely the promotion side of things is all up to them.

not to sound cynicle, but sounds like your going to do all the hardwork & theyre going to take the prestige


compared to them, were doing hardly any hard work. were just finding apropriate bands and doing a bit of promotion, they're getting sponsors, hiring everything, making the name and posters and stuff, organising street teams.......... not to mention raising 6000 dollars. im just trying to help them out as much as i can.

and putting on a gig does cost alot, considering the venue cost (1200) security (another few thousand dollars, considering that you need2 guards plus another one for every hundred people you are expecting) paramedics and any other expenses, 5000-6000 was an acurate guess.
#11
first off, i live in a city, and i know fairly large drawing bands within the city (who dont need to travel) that are willing to play for free. even if the turn out is bad, we only need 300 people to show up for the profits to exeed 6 grand. since theres gonna be 5 or more bands, thats 60 fans for each band. we have 7 months to prepare for it and promote it and we might even get sponsors too, so i have alot of faith in it. alot of people even say they'd be willing to pay 25 bucks.

anyway, i'm not here to argue the possible success of the event, but rather to ask you guys for fundraising ideas and stuff.
Last edited by spiderfizz at Apr 25, 2008,
#12
Don't ask for help if you aren't willing to except the constructive criticism. We just want to make sure you aren't getting in over your heads.

Are you sure that you can fill such a large venue?

If you aren't 100% sure, then you should downgrade to a smaller one.

I have a hard time paying $20 to see a well know band that I love. I would never spend that to see four or five local bands, with the exception of a charity event.

You're wanting to raise money for a good cause, you definitely don't want to lose money.
*-)
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
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i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#13
Quote by spiderfizz

and putting on a gig does cost alot, considering the venue cost (1200) security (another few thousand dollars, considering that you need2 guards plus another one for every hundred people you are expecting) paramedics and any other expenses, 5000-6000 was an acurate guess.


with any real venue security comes with the price of hire or at least it does in this country...


im not trying to be mean or anything dude, but i seriously think your event sounds like a financial disaster waiting to happen. I hope it goes well for you though.

links to the bands that will be playing?
#14
Spyder,

That is great that you are getting involved with charitable causes... the world would be a better place if more young folks took your lead. It's important to keep your expectations in check. I live in Savannah, GA and a few years ago, I was involved with a "Rock the Cure" for the American Diabetes Ass. This was an all day afair. The venue was awesome... our local AAA baseball stadium. (which was donated along with ALL of the proceeds for concessions and beer sales) The sound equipment was donated as were the sound techs' time (they even put together a CD of the event and presold them for the ADA)... Stages and lighting was also donated.

The event was not only promoted free of charge by our local CBS affiliate, it was also promoted in our local paper for two months... once again ... all donated. The line up included the best bands from the Savannah and Athens, GA music scene. We presold the tickets ($10.00 each- 3 for $20.00 and $15.00 at the door) to the event for 2 months before the event. The turn out was about 250 people. (the stadium hols about 4000.) However, because of our major sponsors (which included our local Budwieser distibutor and numerous other (about 15) local businesses which donated an average of $1000.00 each, the show was a success.

If you take this on... I would not count on the gate for your income, nor would I spend one dime on anything. Get EVERYTHING donated. Good Luck.
Dish
#15
Quote by Dishburn
Spyder,

That is great that you are getting involved with charitable causes... the world would be a better place if more young folks took your lead. It's important to keep your expectations in check. I live in Savannah, GA and a few years ago, I was involved with a "Rock the Cure" for the American Diabetes Ass. This was an all day afair. The venue was awesome... our local AAA baseball stadium. (which was donated along with ALL of the proceeds for concessions and beer sales) The sound equipment was donated as were the sound techs' time (they even put together a CD of the event and presold them for the ADA)... Stages and lighting was also donated.

The event was not only promoted free of charge by our local CBS affiliate, it was also promoted in our local paper for two months... once again ... all donated. The line up included the best bands from the Savannah and Athens, GA music scene. We presold the tickets ($10.00 each- 3 for $20.00 and $15.00 at the door) to the event for 2 months before the event. The turn out was about 250 people. (the stadium hols about 4000.) However, because of our major sponsors (which included our local Budwieser distibutor and numerous other (about 15) local businesses which donated an average of $1000.00 each, the show was a success.

If you take this on... I would not count on the gate for your income, nor would I spend one dime on anything. Get EVERYTHING donated. Good Luck.
Dish
Good advice.

I forgot to mention that he should try to get the local media to promote it for free.
*-)
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#16
This is to dishburn sorry to go off topic...

Just so the guy you are all giving advice to isn't mislead... are you sure it was a success? It would be awesome to play to 250 people, but (not getting fired up here in any way) i have never done a PROPER gig with an originals band and played to 300 people at a school music night. I guess it IS different cos you drew that crowd and it was invaluable experience i am sure (well done) but If i was a sponsor and had chucked money of that amount at you to reach 250 people on the day I wouldn't be too happy.

oh, and so im not being annoying...
With the gig man, I predict a fair amount of standing on street corners with flyers is going to take up a lot of your time in the next months! Get street teams together to distribute flyers, talk to local radio stations to plug the hell out of you and jump on any and I mean ANY free advertising space. I mean as small as those small comunity centre or business (hell my local haidresser has one I think) noticeboards were they let you stick your business card of flyer when you go there. Think about just 6, yes 6 people seeing one of 20 of those cards, all over the city , bringing 3 friends each and buying some food or drink at the gig. thats 24 people paying 20 bucks to go in and spending up to 10 on merch. Work the numbers, and that small scale scenario gets u big cash. All the little things add up and do absolutely everything you can do to get folks to show up.
Mal: "Doctor, I'm taking your sister under my protection here. If anything happens to her, anything at all, I swear to you, I will get very choked up. Honestly, there could be tears." FIREFLY RULES!!!
#17
Quote by axemanchris
As I say, ultimately, if people aren't that interested in going, it won't make a difference if it is for a charity or not. They don't want to drop more than $10 on bands they don't know - regardless of genre, and regardless of where the money is going. Where it does make a difference is that, if it is a charity, the media is more willing to help you out.

CT


Very good point. Most people don't care if the show's for charity or not. Your price has to be reasonable. No more than ten. The lower the cost, the bigger the turnout. We're having a charity concert in a week or two and admissions like two or three bucks.
#18
Ima,

I agree with you 100% I don't want to mislead Spyder. My reaLpoint was, if we had relied only on ticket sales, and didn't have everything donated, it would have been a flop. (our sponsors, for the most part were happy because for their money, they all recieved free TV and newspaper coverage, VIP tickets to the events and signage as well as they were a part of an effort that raise over $20,000.00US)

Oh, and BTW I did not play... These were great area bands that are pretty famous in the Southeast... real pro's... some with record contracts, etc. ( WAAAAYYYY out of my league)

We also goofed by holding our event on the same weekend as a major local PGA Tour event a few miles away in Hilton Head... they took some of our crowd I'm sure.

It was no easy task, either... we had a commitee of about 40 people and most worked on it for about 20 hours a week for 2 1/2 to 3 months. The commitee was burned out... that's why we have not had a Rock the Cure 2.

Dish
#19
Quote by Dishburn


Oh, and BTW I did not play... These were great area bands that are pretty famous in the Southeast... real pro's... some with record contracts, etc. ( WAAAAYYYY out of my league)



just out of curiousity, how many bands were there? 250/5 = 50 people brought in by each band which isnt great.

now my maths is pretty crap but is 250 16% of 4000? now i think what youve done is great, and the company tie ins are frankly amazing, you must be a PR machine. but id be really disheartened by that turn out myself, which comes back to my general point that people are apathetic assholes & organising gigs is a pain in the ass