#1
Well, I was thinking about maybe getting one, in vingate white cuz I think the red one is ugly on this model and I already have a black guitar. I know this guitar will be an upgrade from what I already have. Mine only has one tone, one volume, 2 way toggle, and one humbucker. But I would still like to know If I'm making a good choice. I won't be able to get enough $$ to get the gibson faded special though so don't even mention it.

Also, if Im making a bad choice, please tel me nicely and don't like flame and stuff......Just chill out

Thanks.
#3
Quote by blue_strat
If you can afford the G-400, go for that.

Well, is the vintage one any good or should I just wait until I have enough for the standard g-400
#4
don't get it. get a g-400. its a little more money for a LOT more guitar
Ibanez S520ex
Epiphone G-400
Roland Microcube
Alvarez MC90
#5
Quote by impeachpedro10
don't get it. get a g-400. its a little more money for a LOT more guitar

+1

I'm not sure if its true, but the G-310 looks so much cheaper IMO than the G-400
#6
I would definately go for a G-400. If you dont want red or black, they have it in light blue, similar to Travis Stever from Coheed and Cambria's SG in the Devil in Jersey City video. It looks great, and i like how they play as well.
#7
The G-310 looks tackier but it sounds so much more like a real Gibson SG. IMO you should go for the 310.
#9
it is. the 310 has cheaper pickups, and is a bolt on neck, restricting upper fret access.
part of the reason i love my sg is the COMPLETE access of any fret on the neck without even the slightest bit of discomfort. the 310 wont do that.
Ibanez S520ex
Epiphone G-400
Roland Microcube
Alvarez MC90
#10
Ok, thanks but what is the difference between the pickups and the finishes for the vintage and standard g-400s? I'm not even positive there are different pickups.

Either way I think I'll get the standard, cuz I still want that shiny white finish, though the red actually looks good on this one. My friend just has this guitar (never let me play it >:-() in the cherry and I don't want the same thing.
#11
Vintage faded?
I don't think theres a difference in pickups
The faded body feels like Matte though (not a fan)
Get the glossy white one for sure
I have the cherry red, really nice.
But I wish I could have the white =/
#12
Save for the G-400 or get an Agile.

On second thought, don't get an Agile SG copy, they look like balls.

They probably play well, though.
Knowledge speaks, but wisdom listens.

When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.


-Jimi Hendrix-

Quote by CodySG
You know you're in the drug thread when you see pictures of squash and "tuna nigga!" when you click the page.
#13
The difference between the G-400 and G-400 Vintage are simply that the regular G-400 is made with a normal full-gloss finish, the Vintage is made with a matte/satin finish that is 'selectively thick' (some areas of the finish will be randomly thinner than other areas - basically, they take less care over making sure it's smooth and even. It's a cheap way of making it look 'worn'). Other than that, they're exactly the same guitars.

If you want white, you've got three options: G-400 Custom (3 pickups and gold hardware), track down a Limited Edition G-400 White (hard to get hold of now; the American ones also have active EMG pickups, European-released onces have regular G-400 passive pickups), or the vintage white G-310.


The 310 isn't actually a bad guitar. It's just not a 'real' SG; it uses alder in the body instead of mahogany, the 'full' pickguard doesn't quite extend down to the tune-o-matic bridge, and it has a bolt-on neck. It's actually arguable whether or not these changes make the guitar worse though.


The alder body is probably the most debtable point. Even the very best Custom Shop Fender Stratocasters, use alder in the bodies. It is a very good body wood. The only 'problem' is, tradtionally SGs are made with mahogany. Perhaps you might prefer the tone and weight of alder though? Remember too, a mahogany Epi SG will have a darker tone than a Gibson SG, thanks to the thick plastic-based poly finish (Gibson use a thin nitro lacquer finish), so slap the thick finish on an alder body and you end up with a tone right between a normal SG and an HH Strat.

The pickguard, most people wouldn't even spot the difference anyway. It does matter if you intend to ever replace the pickguard though; 310's don't take the same standard full pickguard as other SGs, so you'll need to have new pickguards custom made for you.

As for the bolt-on neck... well, depends on your hands. I find the neck join is the same size as a Fender Telecaster, and to me, that poses absolutely no access problems at all. I've played a 310 and could easily and comfortably make full use of the highest frets. In fact if anything, I find Epi's bolt-on joins to provide better access than their set neck joins. On the other hand though, if you hame smaller hands (granted, I am aware I have oddly large hands and long fingers), the bolt-on neck probably will limit your access somewhat. Tonally and sustain-wise, you have to be more careful with bolt-on necks; a bolt-on neck can give just as much sustain (more, in fact) than a set-neck, but only if it's a very tight join; many Epi bolt on necks don't have a tight join. The upsdie of all of this is of course, if the G-400's set neck breaks, you're screwed; it will cost more to fix than it would to just buy a whole new guitar. On the other hand, if the 310's bolt neck breaks, you can just buy a new neck for £50 and be done with it.



Overall, I don't think it's fair to really write off the G-310 entirely. I myself played one against a G-400 and found the differences to be either negligable, and I in fact preferred the 310 in many aspects. Personally though I can't stand a vintage white finish (why they can't just use proper white, I don't know), so i shelled out the extra cash for the G-400 instead. I don't relly regret it; the G-400 is a great guitar, and for many people, is the better pick. I wil say though, if it hadn't been for the finish problem, the G-310 was damn sure tempting, and really, just as good depending on your tastes.
#14
Quote by bokuho

If you want white, you've got three options: G-400 Custom (3 pickups and gold hardware), track down a Limited Edition G-400 White (hard to get hold of now; the American ones also have active EMG pickups, European-released onces have regular G-400 passive pickups), or the vintage white G-310.



What about this?

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Epiphone-G-400-Electric-Guitar-104319645-i1371713.gc
#15
That is the Limited Edition White G-400. The one pictured there is one of the regular pickup-equipped ones intended for European release. I wasn't aware that version was being sold in America, all the American versions were supposed to have active EMG pickups (and yet, us English had to pay just as much for the passive, regular Epi pickup'd version, as you lot did for the fancy active pickup version. Damn y'all!).

EDIT: lawl at them labeling it an 'exclusive Alpine White finish'. Nothing 'exclusive' about it, it was just a general Limited Edition. I suppose they could claim they were exclusively the only American outlet to stock the passive pickup version, but in most people's eyes, that wouldn't be something to boast about...
Last edited by bokuho at Apr 22, 2008,
#16
Ew, I just looked at a 310 for the first time... The cut away doesn't even let you have all the frets and the whole thing just looks kinda chinzy... Go for the G400, I'm very happy with mine.
#17
id get the Epiphone G-400 Limited Edition

it vs the Gibson SG Standard pics

http://www.guitarcenter.com/item/expandedimage.aspx?t=4&img=Epiphone/419610jpg.jpg

http://www.guitarcenter.com/item/expandedimage.aspx?t=4&img=Gibson/273858jpg.jpg

A true-to-the-specs mid-'60s SG for a screaming low price!

The Epiphone Limited Edition 1966 G-400 Electric Guitar is a Gibson-authorized version of their great '66 SG with a solid mahogany body and slim-taper set mahogany neck. Some subtle-yet-significant differences make this one special. First, the body is finished in true heritage cherry, just like a vintage SG. And instead of the small, lower horn-only pickguard, it has the full-body pickguard so there aren't any pickup mounting rings around the high-output alnico humbuckers (the '66 SG had P-90 pickups). Separate volume and tone controls for each of the pickups give you complete control of your sound. A stopbar tailpiece and tune-o-matic bridge provide great sustain and tone. The deep double cutaway lets you reach all 22 frets with ease.]

Epiphone Limited Edition 1966 G-400 Electric Guitar Features:
Double-cutaway solid mahogany body
Slim-taper set mahogany neck
Rosewood fretboard
22 frets
Alnico Classic Plus bridge humbucker
Alnico Classic neck humbucker
2 volume, 2 tone controls
3-way pickup selector
Grover tuners
24.75" scale
1.68" nut width
Chrome hardware

$399

from http://www.guitarcenter.com/Epiphone-Limited-Edition-1966-G-400-Electric-Guitar-102676350-i1166714.gc
#18
Quote by qotsa1998
I would definately go for a G-400. If you dont want red or black, they have it in light blue, similar to Travis Stever from Coheed and Cambria's SG in the Devil in Jersey City video. It looks great, and i like how they play as well.


dude, yes go for the G-400, im getting mine tomorrow, a G-400 Deluxe in an amber colour, its the most beautiful guitar i've ever seen.