#1
Not add6, folks, aug6. I need some help on classical theory here.
So we have to do a composition for our final project in music theory, and whilemy teacher hasn't officially assigned it yet I recently drafted a progression that I think might be good to work with. I asked him last week about the usage of Fr+6 chords because I'd written one in while trying to work out a modulating sequence, and what the rules for approaching this chord are because the book doesn't explain the approach, just the resolution He said he'd tell me, but hasn't gotten back to me about that. Anyway, the relevant part of the progression is: ...V-viidim(third inversion) (fully, not half-diminished)-Fr+6-V...
I asked if this was okay. Specifically, the use of the viidim(4/2) to approach the Fr+6. The resolution to V is obviously ok, that's the essential purpose of a +6 chord. It seemed convenient because the voice leading is quite smooth: the 4 moves up to the #4 and the 7 moves up to 1, both in half steps. The b6 is already voiced in the bass since it's third inversion. It's parallel fourths, so that's okay. The resolution is also straightforward, with the expected motion to 5 in the b6 and #4, the 1 moving to 7 and the 2 staying in place. But when I played a reduction for him today, he said it was too "Stravinsky-esque". A huge compliment, as I love Stravinsky, but this is supposed to be a tonal piece. Baroque-era writing style +6 chords were in use by then though...
So looking online, I see that Mozart used +6 chords a lot, so it should be tonal but my progression is apparently not tonal enough. What about this isn't tonal enough? It's in a major key, but we're about to start working on mode mixture and it's a borrowed 6 so I know that's ok. So is it the approach, and if so what should I approach the Fr+6 with? I'd like to keep it a Fr+6 instead of a It+6 or Ge+6 or removing it altogether, the sound fits well and I like the resolution. This is only theory 1, so my theory knowledge isn't terribly broad. Thanks in advance!
#2
I learned that IV is the most common preparation for +6 chords. You could try replacing the viidim with IV, II (V of V), or bVI. (numerals written relative to major key) I'm not sure if any of those chords would work with your voice leading (or if your teacher would think they are tonal enough (i have no idea why not)), but these usually sound fine.
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#3
The classical approaches are i, iv, vi, iii, and sometimes ii... the vii2 is creative, but it is very romantic. If you want to fit this in with baroque style writing; I hate saying this... but look at some of the Bach corals for the approach. The aug6 chords were in wide use by the baroque period, don't let that bother you.

Seeing actual music would make analysis easier; but if you like it, I'd stick with it.
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#4
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The classical approaches are i, iv, vi, iii, and sometimes ii... the vii2 is creative, but it is very romantic. If you want to fit this in with baroque style writing; I hate saying this... but look at some of the Bach corals for the approach. The aug6 chords were in wide use by the baroque period, don't let that bother you.

Seeing actual music would make analysis easier; but if you like it, I'd stick with it.

Yeah, I read somewhere they were developed in the Renaissance era... so I figured it was the approach. Romantic, eh? Hmm...
The actual music isn't written yet, I played a sketch of the chords with the notes arranged to avoid problems but that was all. No rhythms, no melodic line, it was just chords. It's kind of a shame, he said he thought it would work but when he heard it he changed his mind.
I'll probably add a I and a IV6 or vi (or iv or VI? To borrow a b6 or not to borrow... that is tomorrow's question, when I have both time and a piano to play) between the vii and the Fr+6 then, though I might extend it further. No big deal. Thanks all!
Btw, any Bach chorales in particular to analyze for this?
#5
I don't have my chorale book here, I leave it at the office most of the time... the only analysis book I have at home right now says 'Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten' and 'Ich hab' mein' Sach' Gott heimgestellt'.

In Wer nur, the line is actually kind of hard to analyze, the progression goes V65 - V7/IV - V6/VII - Fr+6 - i64 - V6/V - V - i... the approach is all chromatic, with the bass moving down by semitone throughout. In Ich hab, it's actually an It6 and the approach is with a doubled passing tone and suspension from i, with the +6 subbing for ii (i - It6 - V).
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