#1
what are the 12 modes?? i know the basic 7, Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, and Locrian, but what are the other five? i've used the searchbar, the lessons section, and even searched on Yahoo, but i can't find anything. if you know what they are, or could direct me to a site that does, please enlighten me. (if you know them, please describe them, not just name them) thanks
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#2
There are only 7 modes of the major scale.

The only way there can be 12 modes is if you think of something like C Dorian, C# Dorian, D Dorian, D# Dorian, E Dorian, etc, but that doesn't seem like something about which you need to think.
#3
this family friend of (obviously) my family went to Berklee (college of music) and he said that when he got in, one of the first things he learned was the 12 modes, so i'm still confused
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#4
A. He was messing with you.

OR

B. He misspoke.

I've studied enough music to cover an intro theory class, and I've never heard of "the 12 modes."


Why don't you ask him and report back to us?
#5
hmmmm, seems the Berklee graduate made a little mistake
oh well, i guess i can sleep now
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#6
I think what he ment about the 12 modes is that there's 12 pitch in an octive.
Or 12 notes in a chromatatic scale.
So if you play C# to C# per said.

I wouldn't know what call it..
maybe Idoitallian might sound cool
#8
Theres 2 kind of modes. Greek modes, and Liturgical modes. In old church Gregorian chant (and Byzantine chant) there were 8 modes and then 1000 years later Henricus Glareanus wrote a theory book that said that historically there should be 12.

The first 8 were broken into two groups, authentic and plagal. The plagal ones are different forms of the other ones where the dominant becomes 3 notes below the tonic.

I'll try to make a chart to make this easier:

Authentic Plagal
Dorian Hypodorian
Phrygian Hypophrygian
Lydian Hypolydian
Mixolydian Hypomixolydian

Then later Henry added Aeolian and Ionian with their associated 'hypo' form. Thats where you get your 12 modes.

How this relates to the modern modes we use today:

Liturgical Modern

I - Authentic modes
Dorian Dorian
Phrygian Phrygian
Lydian Lydian
Mixolydian Mixolydian

II - Plagal modes
Hypodorian Aeolian
Hypophrygian Locrian
Hypolydian Ionian
Hypomixolydian Dorian

Thats the best I can do for now. Being at Berklee I can say it's certainly not the first thing I learned at all, but I can imagine that someone taking traditional theory might have to learn it.

I'm off for now, 9'o clock ensemble in the morning.