#1
so ive been using the searchbar, and in the "dream guitar" thread i saw a lot of people were putting maple fretboards. now i am looking at a few guitars, and one of the differences is a rosewood fretboard vs a maple fretboard. is there anything wrong with rosewood? is maple better on all accounts? let me in on this secret!
#2
i bet you just tried to copy and paste my avatar didn't you
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#4
Quote by cpick2014
so ive been using the searchbar, and in the "dream guitar" thread i saw a lot of people were putting maple fretboards. now i am looking at a few guitars, and one of the differences is a rosewood fretboard vs a maple fretboard. is there anything wrong with rosewood? is maple better on all accounts? let me in on this secret!

Different sound and feel. Rosewood is smoother and warmer, while maple is clearer and sharper. That's an immense generalization, but that's essentially the breakdown. They feel different to play on, of course (maple being lacquered and rosewood being left natural).
Sincerely, Chad.
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#5
Rosewood, maple is poo poo for the fingers.
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#6
I only have a little experience between the two, but I played on a LP copy for two years or so and that was nice and comfy, but once I switched to the maple on my Fender Tele, I found myself in love. To be honest, that's probably a lot to do with the guitars themselves, and if I were you I'd go into a shop and see if you can get a hold of two strats with different necks or something, any guitar which has the same model but with different necks, and see what you like the feel of.
#7
Have a few strats with both. The neck I like the best is maple with a madagascar rosewood for the fret board. Very warm sound and plays great.
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#8
its the look and feel. if rosewood looks better, use rosewood, if maple looks better, use maple. as for feel, there's really not a huge difference at all
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#9
Ok unless you are Eric Johnson, you are not going to be able to tell the difference between the sounds of your fretboard THAT much. If you honestly think it does then you listen to **** too much lol!

And Chad, maple is not always lacquered... why did you say that? My maple fretboards aren't lacquered.


Thread starter it really comes down to the look. I think the fretboard depends on the colour of the guitar, but some people choose it for "tone". These are the people that think the paint on a guitar affects your tone. They are elitist, mocachino drinking, Harvard educated asses lol! No offence to those who graduated from Harvard.

So really it's up to how it looks for you.
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#10
Quote by AngusJimiKeith
its the look and feel. if rosewood looks better, use rosewood, if maple looks better, use maple. as for feel, there's really not a huge difference at all
On my guitars I think there is a definite difference in feel. I have a '63 Melody Maker w/ rosewood board. It feel more "slippery" than the maple board on my MIM Strat. The difference is probably the fact that the rosewood board is oiled and the maple is clearcoated.

tbh, I don't mind the feel of the maple at all, it's just different.
... and I LOVE the way it looks.
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#12
Maple that isn't finished is prone to extreme and quick wear. It's softer than rosewood and that is why it is commonly lacquered. I have encountered only ONE unfinished maple fretboard in my life, and its creator (it was a homemade guitar) regretted it.

There is certainly a difference in tone, just like saddle shape and material has a difference in tone, just like nut material has a difference in tone. Sorry if you don't notice it.

Edit: also, finish does not have much of an effect on the tone of an electric, but it has some effect. Just compare it to the difference that finish makes on an acoustic, where everything is heightened.
Quote by Øttər
These are the people that think the paint on a guitar affects your tone. They are elitist, mocachino drinking, Harvard educated asses lol! No offence to those who graduated from Harvard.

I don't appreciate you calling me an "elitist" and an "ass." Having studied instrument construction and repair for a great part of my life, I think I understand a bit more of the tonal changes that "aesthetic" items have than you. If you want, I could always email or cite Dan Erlewine's work to back up my claims. You'd be hard-pressed to find someone to argue with him.
Sincerely, Chad.
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Last edited by Chad48309 at Apr 23, 2008,
#13
My current strats are rosewood, but my old squier korea had a laquered maple neck- and I prefered the feel of that to the rosewood ones.
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#14
lol dude I was joking... hence the "lol's" and the "" And, maybe I'm wrong but in my personal experience maple is really hard. Hence the name "hard maple" or"rock maple". Again, I may be wrong.
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#15
Quote by Øttər
lol dude I was joking... hence the "lol's" and the "" And, maybe I'm wrong but in my personal experience maple is really hard. Hence the name "hard maple" or"rock maple". Again, I may be wrong.

The Janka Rating doesn't lie: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janka_Wood_Hardness_Rating

Edit: one of the common types of rosewood used on fretboards (like those available from Stewart Macdonald) is Indian rosewood. Though not on the Wikipedia list, the Janka rating can be found here. Note that even for green (fresh) material, the Janka rating still surpasses that of maple: 1,560. The rating for dry is more than double, though: 3,170.
Sincerely, Chad.
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LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
Last edited by Chad48309 at Apr 23, 2008,