#1
whats up guys.
I want to buy a guitar for metal and hard rock.
I have doubts which guitar to buy...

IBANEZ RG 2570E
OR
JACKSON DKMG - MG SERIES

so what do you think guys?
#2
Ibanez. Great trem, faster neck, and a better bolt on heel (unless its neck thru!). Only bad thing I can see from it are the pickups and the looks. they are so ugly compared to Jacksons.
#3
Ibanez all the way.
For those who care.
Current Gear
Cort Zenox Z42
Flextone II
Charvel USA So-Cal
Farida M2 Parlour Acoustic
Admira Hand-built Spanish Acoustic
Blackstar HT-5H
Line 6 M13
#4
neck type 3pc Wizard neck
body Basswood body
fret Jumbo frets
bridge Edge Pro bridge
neck pu DiMarzio® IBZ-N (H) neck pu
middle pu DiMarzio® IBZ-S (S) mid pu
bridge pu DiMarzio® IBZ-B (H) bridge pu

well? what do you think guys? is it worth it ?
#5
Definitely.

But first. Whats your current guitar and whats your current amp?
For those who care.
Current Gear
Cort Zenox Z42
Flextone II
Charvel USA So-Cal
Farida M2 Parlour Acoustic
Admira Hand-built Spanish Acoustic
Blackstar HT-5H
Line 6 M13
#6
I dont have a guitar. its my first guitar, that is why I want it to be good guitar, especially for metal and hard rock.
Im buying Roland Micro-CUBE btw.
#7
Quote by glaucoma
I dont have a guitar. its my first guitar, that is why I want it to be good guitar, especially for metal and hard rock.
Im buying Roland Micro-CUBE btw.

then don't get anything with a floating trem, like the two guitars you've chosen, it'll hinder your progress horribly.

Just get an Ibanez RG321 to start on.
Actually called Mark!

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#8
^+1. Use the money you save to buy a better amp, unless you absolutely need something tiny and headphone-capable.
Ibanez RGA121 | ESP LTD H-1000
Axe-FX Standard
#9
The micro-cube is a great choice but as steven said a floating bridge might be a bad choice. In fact, an expencive guitar would be a bad choice.
Reason being because, say you don't 'like' playing guitar after a few months. You've just gone and blown $1000~ on something you dont want.

the Ibanez RG321 is an excellent guitar for the price.
For those who care.
Current Gear
Cort Zenox Z42
Flextone II
Charvel USA So-Cal
Farida M2 Parlour Acoustic
Admira Hand-built Spanish Acoustic
Blackstar HT-5H
Line 6 M13
#10
Quote by steven seagull
then don't get anything with a floating trem, like the two guitars you've chosen, it'll hinder your progress horribly.

Just get an Ibanez RG321 to start on.



+1
#11
No point buying something cheap, and after 4-5 month to buy a new guitar.
that is why I want to buy something good, something that can good for the LONG space.
that is why the doubts with the IBANEZ RG 2570E or JACKSON DKMG - MG SERIES.

need something good, for long time, then again... Im a new guitarist, I need it to be comfortable to play with.
#12
If you honestly know that you will be playing guitar for a long time, then by all means invest in an upper-level guitar.

To the same extent, since you plan on playing guitar for a long time, consider getting a more suitable amp that will take advantage of such a great guitar.

Another concern that should be addressed is the setup/usage of a double-locking tremolo. If you're willing to learn how to set up and maintain it, then that's fine, but many people think that it's a little daunting for someone who's just starting out on guitar.

All in all, I would personally go for the Ibanez. The stock DiMarzio-designed pickups are apparently very good (haven't tried any myself yet), and the Edge Pro is an amazing trem, so right out of the box, that axe should be awesome.
Ibanez RGA121 | ESP LTD H-1000
Axe-FX Standard
#14
Quote by glaucoma
No point buying something cheap, and after 4-5 month to buy a new guitar.
that is why I want to buy something good, something that can good for the LONG space.
that is why the doubts with the IBANEZ RG 2570E or JACKSON DKMG - MG SERIES.

need something good, for long time, then again... Im a new guitarist, I need it to be comfortable to play with.


Seriously, you've got next to no chance of learning with a floating bridge - they're incredibly sensitive and difficult to tune, not to mention fiddly to maintain. If you get one you'll be looking at hours to change strings and get it in tune. Everytime your picking hand goes near the bridge you'll send everything out of tune and if you break a string (which you will, frequently, when starting) the guitar becomes unplayable, . For an experienced player they really aren't a problem, but for a beginner they're an absolute no-go.

For your first guitar you want something simple, otherwise all the complications of maintaining the thing are going to get in the way of learning to play it. The RG321 is a good, solid guitar that's more than adequate for a beginner - it's solid enough to act as a backup gigging guitar for a more experienced player.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Apr 23, 2008,
#15
i wouldnt agree, speaking about the Ibanez, its a very good guitar, although it has a trem, its an edge pro trem, the best trem that you can buy. you wont face very big trouble in tunning, the locking nuts will keep it in tune for insane times. I know changing the strings will be a headache but u can get help for the first couple of times till you get used to it. I recomend the RG, you will love it and never think of any other guitar to replace it.
#16
Quote by Jyscal
i wouldnt agree, speaking about the Ibanez, its a very good guitar, although it has a trem, its an edge pro trem, the best trem that you can buy. you wont face very big trouble in tunning, the locking nuts will keep it in tune for insane times. I know changing the strings will be a headache but u can get help for the first couple of times till you get used to it. I recomend the RG, you will love it and never think of any other guitar to replace it.


It's an amazing trem, but it's going to make the guitar practically unplayable for a beginner. I remember my first experience with a floating trem when I'd been playing a few months and I simply couldn't play in tune with it...never mind looking after the thing. Could I have got used to it? Possibly, but it's not worth taking the risk off becoming too frustrated to ever learn properly. Learning the guitar is difficult enough without making things more awkward for yourself.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
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...it's a seagull

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#17
you're so sure about sticking with the guitar, thats great. But neck size is a personal preference and what if you don't like the ibanez neck? Get something cheaper, or rent something for a month or two just to get used to playing. You'll have a much better point of reference when you go to try out guitars for the long haul.
#19
Quote by steven seagull
It's an amazing trem, but it's going to make the guitar practically unplayable for a beginner. I remember my first experience with a floating trem when I'd been playing a few months and I simply couldn't play in tune with it...never mind looking after the thing. Could I have got used to it? Possibly, but it's not worth taking the risk off becoming too frustrated to ever learn properly. Learning the guitar is difficult enough without making things more awkward for yourself.



its true its going to be a bit harder, but i don't think its going to be that big of a headache to learn on a trem. i think keeping it in tune will depend on how much u abuse ur trem especially that it has locked nuts, so you wont go out of tune unless ur messin around wih ur trem in a wrong manner. if u use it probably you’ll be just fine, i suggest that u get help to learn at first. i know it might not make sense, but after he gets better he is going to search for a good guitar with a term. so why not buying that in the first place. one more poiece of advice, get a tuner with the guitar, itll make tunning alot more easier.
#20
Quote by Jyscal
its true its going to be a bit harder, but i don't think its going to be that big of a headache to learn on a trem. i think keeping it in tune will depend on how much u abuse ur trem especially that it has locked nuts, so you wont go out of tune unless ur messin around wih ur trem in a wrong manner. if u use it probably you’ll be just fine, i suggest that u get help to learn at first. i know it might not make sense, but after he gets better he is going to search for a good guitar with a term. so why not buying that in the first place. one more poiece of advice, get a tuner with the guitar, itll make tunning alot more easier.

If only because if he might never get that far if he starts with a floating bridge, and trust me, it WILL be that much of a headache. When you're starting out you want things to be as straightforward as possible and a floating bridge is simply too much to be dealing with.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#21
i kinda agree with what seagull said.

if you are switching from an acoustic then maybe go for the ibanez (great guitar by all means).
but if you're just starting to play guitar then get something cheaper. maybe one day you'll change your mind and want a start-type or even a les paul.
the rg2570 has a neck that in my opinion is good only for metal. when i got my rg2550 (basically the same s**t) i was thinking on selling my old guitar, but after i while i realized i couldn't play any frusciante style music on it (the neck is quite large), so i decided to keep my old guitar..

hope it helps.
crush
#22
thank you all guys, you're great
I still need to think about it, but honestly, I think Ill get the IBANEZ RG2570.
as hard as it can be, I believe I'll deal with it.
I dont have enough money to buy cheap guitar, and after a few month a better one.
though I think Ill use Jyscal advice and buy tuner.
#23
good luck bro, just keep focusing and you will get over any obstacle you face. one last piece of advice, don't abuse your tremolo bar, or even don't use it untill u learn how to and how much to pull before u might break a string. i think you will love the RG its an amazing guitar.
good luck
#24
Quote by Jyscal
good luck bro, just keep focusing and you will get over any obstacle you face. one last piece of advice, don't abuse your tremolo bar, or even don't use it untill u learn how to and how much to pull before u might break a string. i think you will love the RG its an amazing guitar.
good luck


thank you man thx alot
#25
Quote by glaucoma
thank you man thx alot

do a search to read up on blocking the tremolo, that should help with tuning instability. buying a tuner is a great idea, i have the korg CA-30 chromatic tuner (not the guitar tuner GA-30) and would recommend it. If you'll be playing gigs you could consider a pedal board tuner.
#26
Quote by glaucoma
thank you all guys, you're great
I still need to think about it, but honestly, I think Ill get the IBANEZ RG2570.
as hard as it can be, I believe I'll deal with it.
I dont have enough money to buy cheap guitar, and after a few month a better one.
though I think Ill use Jyscal advice and buy tuner.

Honestly, you'll be making a big mistake - it's not possible to fully appreciate how much of a headache a floating bridge can be unless you already play the guitar.

Far better to buy something cheaper than risk having a £500 guitar that you never learn to play. If you don't want to buy an intermediate guitar then just buy something dirt cheap to learn on - how "good" the guitar is shouldn't be a factor in motivating you to learn...some people start out on piece of crap nylon strung acoustics. You can't buy a guitar for the long term because a beginners needs are different to an experienced players. You'll have your hands full with simply trying to hold the thing and fret strings, you'll be making things 10 times harder with a floating bridge and it's highly likely that you'll be too frustrated to get anywhere....even many experienced players shy away from floating bridges.

Seriously, if you get the RG you'll regret it, because you'll have this amazing looking guitar that sounds like crap because you won't be able to learn on it.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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Last edited by steven seagull at Apr 23, 2008,
#27
really what steven is saying is basically correct. i know many people that own floating bridges yet haven't the slightest clue how to take care of them. for one, a friend of mine started with a guitar with a floating bridge. he tried to tune it to drop C from standard tuning... then after getting frustrated and not able to fix his "problem" he proclaimed it broken and didn't play for a full week till he told us and we fixed it.

now im not saying you'll rashly do what my buddy did, but theres many other problems that can occur as outlined in steven's post.

in my personal experience, i started out with a floating bridge. it was difficult at first, but i managed to overcome it and learn how to set it up properly and to my liking. that being said, looking back i probably would have preferred to get something without a floating bridge so i could easily change tunings and play a wider array of songs i like. o and did i mention i got an edge III? i didn't know any better.

i personally think you should take steven's advice and look into basic guitars without floating bridges. however, if you really really want that particular guitar, and are willing to work through all the problems you might have, then i say go for it.

here's a site where you can read up on setting it up if you decide to go with the floater.
http://www.ibanezrules.com/tech/setup/index.htm
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