#1
can someone explain it. im sure that iv seen something somewhere here about it but can't remember where it is but if someone knows direct me there
#2
If the key of the song is in C major for example, you could constuct an arpeggio using the C-major scale or the scale of its relative minor (A minor in this case).
#3
no im sorry to inform you you are dead wrong lord-o-donuts. you simply cannot arpeggiate a scale. an arpeggio is a broken chord not a scale, so saying that one should arpeggiate the c major scale or a minor over a song in c major is fantastically insane. and then telling him to construct an arpeggio over its relative minor makes me question gods original plan for humanity. unless the chord you playing over is a "Cmajaddeverything" then your advice is just silly

to answer your question in order to construct some arpeggios for the chords all you need to do is break up the tones of the chords you are playing over. take the root-third-fifth of the chords (be they major or minor) and simply find some pattern over the neck where they will work. hope that can clarify it for you
#4
Quote by Lord-O-Donuts
If the key of the song is in C major for example, you could constuct an arpeggio using the C-major scale or the scale of its relative minor (A minor in this case).

If you're suggesting that you play an A minor scale over a C major chord, then you are epically wrong.
#5
Basically to arpeggiate is to play chord tones, generally in order. Naturally this means that you change notes when the chord changes. So over a C G Am F progression you would play C major chord tones, then G major chord tones, then A minor chord tones, then F major chord tones. Of course, doing a solo consisting entirely of arpeggios can be a bit boring; you'll want to put some more melodic elements in and whatnot.
#6
The easiest way to arpeggiate over chords, just hold a chord and pick each note individually. That will result in an arpeggio. Example: play an A minor barre chord in 5th position. Play the three high strings descending, one at time. It will result in an A minor arpeggio, using the notes (in order) A, E, C, respectively.

And remember, there are many way's to arpeggiate a chord. Just try out different spots on the fingerboard, from way up high to utilizing open strings, whatever you want.
WHY IS EVERYONE IN THE PIT A FUCKING METALCORE KID