#1
ive been playing guitar for a little over two years, i cant afford, and i dont have time for a guitar teacher. ive been trying to learn theory for months but every lesson i find on UG always uses one piece of music theory to explain another. so if anyone could suggest a good lesson to start me off i would be eternaly greatful.
Emerse your soul in love


You used to be alright What happened?


Yellow tigers crouched in jungles in her Dark Eyes .
#3
fred solovcks-fretboard roadmap...it is a very good book and goes through a wide variety of everything...without being condicending cough*cough*The Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Theory
#5
Quote by heavyairship
ive been playing guitar for a little over two years, i cant afford, and i dont have time for a guitar teacher. ive been trying to learn theory for months but every lesson i find on UG always uses one piece of music theory to explain another. so if anyone could suggest a good lesson to start me off i would be eternaly greatful.



take a class
study with a teacher


a few things to look at 1st:

- 1/2 steps and whole steps (these intervals are the building blocks of diatonic scales)

-Major scale

-minor scale

-intervals of the Major scale

-other intervals as they relate to the intervals of the Major scale

-Triads (chords)

-7th chords

These are some of the basics. But again study with a teacher if possible. Online your likely to get mostly opinions & arguments and as a result, a bit of misinformation and confusion.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 23, 2008,
#6
buy the book called "learn to play guitar" it was my first book and its helped me a hell of a lot with theory and composing
#7
Quote by GuitarMunky
take a class
study with a teacher


a few things to look at 1st:

- 1/2 steps and whole steps (these intervals are the building blocks of diatonic scales)

-Major scale

-minor scale

-intervals of the Major scale

-other intervals as they relate to the intervals of the Major scale

-Triads (chords)

-7th chords

These are some of the basics. But again study with a teacher if possible. Online your likely to get mostly opinions & arguments and as a result, a bit of misinformation and confusion.


he says right in his post that he can't afford and doesn't have time for a teacher or class.
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
[...] study with a teacher if possible. Online your likely to get mostly opinions & arguments and as a result, a bit of misinformation and confusion.


+1

A teacher would really help you out, especially if you've had no previous experience with music theory. Getting started and getting the lingo that is used into your head is the hardest part, and a teacher would really facilitate that process.

Edit: @frigginjerk - If the TS really cares about learning music theory, then they would be willing to sacrifice certain other activities in order to save up the money and make time for lessons.
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
#9
Quote by seedmole
+1
Edit: @frigginjerk - If the TS really cares about learning music theory, then they would be willing to sacrifice certain other activities in order to save up the money and make time for lessons.


yeah, i debated giving the TS some crap about not having an hour a week to get a lesson... but he could be in boarding school, in a small hick town with no music shop, etc etc etc etc...

regardless, i taught myself theory independently by using the internet and a few books, as well as working it out physically and with my ear... if there's one thing I can say for sure it's that learning about intervals was the biggest "eureka!" moment of my musical life. Once intervals were understandable, I could learn any aspect of theory I wanted, and it made it easier to practice the stuff I wanted to get really good at. Intervals were the key to my understanding.

therefore, i recommend that if the threadstarter has only the internet at his disposal, he should go to http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/31 and read up, and he should PM me if he has any more questions about intervals.
#10
Quote by frigginjerk
yeah, i debated giving the TS some crap about not having an hour a week to get a lesson... but he could be in boarding school, in a small hick town with no music shop, etc etc etc etc...


True, he might be in some kind of situation where he actually can't find the time/money to take lessons.

It just bugs me when people feel that their schedules are completely rock-solid and can't be adjusted, but still want to be amazing guitarist. It takes a lot of effort and sacrifice to become good at anything, and learning to play the guitar really well is no different. Plus, it would probably take a lot more time and effort to learn it all by yourself without the individual, personal guidance that a teacher would give you.

Anyway, the TS really cannot make any changes to allow for lessons, then read this:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_i.html

Once you read that and get it, move on to part 2, part 3, and so on and so forth. If something doesn't make sense to you, then just set it aside and come back to it in a little while. Before too long you will get it, trust me.
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
#11
thank you everyone. youve all given me more than enough to get me started, especialy friggenjerk, you rock. i really appreciate it.
Emerse your soul in love


You used to be alright What happened?


Yellow tigers crouched in jungles in her Dark Eyes .
#12
Quote by frigginjerk
he says right in his post that he can't afford and doesn't have time for a teacher or class.



thats cool, well my advice is the same. I mean get what you can from the internet. There is alot you can learn, but if you really want a deeper understanding, having some guidance and learning step by step is the best thing I can recommend.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 23, 2008,
#13
Read "The Crusades" in the columms section of this website. Pretty much explained everything to me that I could never understand before.
#14
Good advices above but I want to add one thing to it and the net has plenty of infos. It's a method called the CAGED system. It makes use of the five chord shapes and they are played in open and closed forms. They are connected by their octaves and can cover the whole fretboard. It's one of the fretboard logic that's popular and you'll find scales, triads, pentatonics, inversions, and modes belonging to each of the chord shapes.

It sounds complicated but really it's not. Once you know about it everything falls in. Just learning the chord shapes themselves and seeing how it laid out on the fretbaord is enough for you to get the logic.